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while I have no experience with this LE version, a proper single shot adapter for this kind of rifle is not the same geometry as the magazine cut off. The cut off requires the extractor ride over the rim. I dont have a cut off, so assuming from looking at them and reading here, that is how the cut off works.

A proper single feed ramp is angled up and will place the rim behind the extractor. It should work the same or similar to how the last round comes off the magazine. It might be, could be, should be, made to more accurately guide the round direct into the chamber.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
I have a No1 MKIII action and took some pics of how the adapter would basically fit but I’d have to do a little fitting so it would go up completely into the bottom of the action. The front of the adapter has a lip that goes over the original feed ramp.

Haven’t had time to lost at it with a No4 action.
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Is there enough demand for a single shot platform in Lee Enfield rifles?
Just wondering if an outfit like Score High might entertain the idea. If it could be done at a reasonable price point to even warrant a run.
 

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If demand was there then one like the many moulded plastic models made for common rifles could be the way to go. There is demand here being met for rifles from Anschutz .22's to Tikka centrefires so why not the Enfield?
 

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One can't help but imagine a 3-D printer setup might be able to "crank out" this type of device!?!

We'd just grab a 5-round mag for 95 cents and slap it up into a No. 5 before heading out for a summer canoe trip.

Geez...how'd I get this old??
 

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Not being hands on familiar with 3D printing I need to ask. I understand it would be easy enough to make. How would it hold up?
With a certain amount of drag on the surface, how long would it take before wear/galling/scarring come into play?

On another board, a few years ago someone came up with 3D trigger guards to replace the plastic ones. At the time I really couldn’t see the advantage.
Has 3D evolved that far where it can compete with other proven materials in performance and cost?
 

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DDog, I was thinking something that might fit over the top of the factory follower that fed from center opposed to one side of the mag or another.
Take the mag apart and drop in the adaptor. Reinsert the original beneath. Repeat to remove to use it in another rifle.
The Benchrest Follower I have is nestled in its third rifle already. Might stay there since it works so well for 7.62x39 in a 98 action.
I do have a short follower and block, but it’s a bit less than perfect function-wise.

light bulb 💡
I never thought to try it in a P14.
 

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Not being hands on familiar with 3D printing I need to ask. I understand it would be easy enough to make. How would it hold up?
With a certain amount of drag on the surface, how long would it take before wear/galling/scarring come into play?

On another board, a few years ago someone came up with 3D trigger guards to replace the plastic ones. At the time I really couldn’t see the advantage.
Has 3D evolved that far where it can compete with other proven materials in performance and cost?
As a guide to the longevity of 3D printed parts, there is a company in the US which 3D prints prosthetic hip joints. We email them the CT scan images of the hip that needs replacing, they make a perfectly fitting 3D-printed hip joint out of some sort of alloy, then mail it back to Australia for surgical implantation. Even the plastic material used by most printers is very hard wearing.
 

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As a guide to the longevity of 3D printed parts, there is a company in the US which 3D prints prosthetic hip joints. We email them the CT scan images of the hip that needs replacing, they make a perfectly fitting 3D-printed hip joint out of some sort of alloy, then mail it back to Australia for surgical implantation. Even the plastic material used by most printers is very hard wearing.
Thank you. I hadn’t realized the development has come along this far is such a short period of time.
 

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Not being hands on familiar with 3D printing I need to ask. I understand it would be easy enough to make. How would it hold up?
With a certain amount of drag on the surface, how long would it take before wear/galling/scarring come into play?

On another board, a few years ago someone came up with 3D trigger guards to replace the plastic ones. At the time I really couldn’t see the advantage.
Has 3D evolved that far where it can compete with other proven materials in performance and cost?
It would be plenty durable for this application, and extremely cheap to make so you could replace the part for a couple dollars every time it wore out. For a low run part like this, 3D printing is going to be a lot more cost effective than paying for molds or dies to make it from sheet metal or polymer.

Additive manufacturing is extremely advanced these days and improving all the time. 3D printing is the most visible aspect of that, and the materials and printer resolution has increased to the point that there are many viable pistol frame files available that will last for hundreds of rounds minimum. There's also selective laser sintering and other additive metal manufacturing techniques. There are British, American, and Israeli fighter jets flying right now that have 3D printed components. They're even working on 3D printing food. I would say that within 20-30 years, additive manufacturing will have reached the point that trying to enforce gun controls in any way except ammunition control will be completely pointless.
 

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That would work really well. Funnily enough it would probably be illegal in Australia - 3D printing firearms parts, that is.
It certainly is illegal in the UK ...................

Source :

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3.25 The manufacture, purchase, sale and possession of 3D printed firearms, ammunition or their component parts is fully captured by the provisions in section 57(1) of the Firearms Act 1968. The definition of firearm in the Act includes any component parts. 3D printed firearms are subject to strict control in the following respects:
a. under section 1 of the 1968 Act, it is an offence for an individual to possess, purchase or acquire any component part of a firearm without a certificate;
b. under section 3 of the 1968 Act, it is an offence for a person to manufacture or possess for sale a component part of a firearm acting by way of trade or business; and
c. under section 5 of the 1968 Act, it is an offence for a person to possess, purchase, acquire, manufacture, sell, transfer, possess for sale or transfer, or purchase or acquire for sale or transfer, a component part of a prohibited weapon without the authority of the Secretary of State for the Home Department or by Scottish Ministers in Scotland
 
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