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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As discussed in other threads, some (many?) of the repro mounts have the steel cross-pin sitting up too high and damage to the notch in the receiver can result from use. Have tried placing bushings of brass and copper in the notch but found they wore out fast. In an effort to come up with a lasting solution I filed the opening in a mount down to the level of the notch in the receiver then made a cross-pin from brass that conforms to the shape of the notch. The pin was sawed off a brass drift of 0.35" diam and filed to shape. Had this to the range a couple of days ago and happy to see the pin showing no deformation after 50 rounds. The brass can't, of course, deform the notch. Looks like this may be the answer and it fits all my snipers. Unfortunately, the '42 sniper refurb I was testing it on is not very accurate- has a rough bore and fouled very badly with the PRVI I was using. Two lengthy cleaning sessions and it's starting to look a lot better and another range trip will be required. As I mentioned to Kujuak in a PM the other day, only one of my four snipers has proven inherently accurate but no surprise as they all have, at best, fair bores.

Ruprecht
 

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Interesting idea; I was following your other thread as well. I have a couple of SVT snipers I have to get to the range one of these days and appreciate the input on the repro mounts.

PA
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the comments, guys. I'm just happy to now have the ability to use my snipers with zero tendency to damage the notch. Unfortunately I've already marred the notch pretty badly on my most accurate '41 Tula sniper. Not going to lose much sleep over it as I payed a whopping $450.00 (Can) for it. But given that the notch (and probably barrel) are the only original things that survive through refurb, owners should be careful- check where that cross-pin sits relative to the notch and be aware that the receiver, at that point, is pretty soft. And Mike- no way to do these brass pins in volume as the pin and expanded hole in the mount have to be carefully matched. But if I can make one anybody can!

The other approach to having a scoped range gun is something collectors will frown on (at least in the US with the prices there). Simply put a small round notch tailored to your repro mount in the receiver and you may be good to go (unless the barrel axis is very poorly aligned with the rear receiver flats). Historically the SVT 40 must have been the rifle most easily converted to the sniping role though I guess the G43/k43 was close. An armourer could make a "field expedient" sniper in about 5 minutes (10 if he had to do a bit of filing on the mount to correct for barrel/ receiver misalignment). I've done that with a '41 Tula (refurb, $200.00) and it's more accurate than 3 of my 4 real snipers. I've attached a couple of photos of a non-sniper '42 that might, possibly, be a field expedient sniper. The seller swore it came out of the crate with the crude notch but I'm suspicious that it was done by Bubba! Has anyone out there got one that they are sure is an actual example of one done in service? regards.

Ruprecht
 

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Rupreht unfortunately it's a Bubba notch. All field made snipers had same shape/form/dimension notch as the the factory made ones.
 

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I agree. When the armors added a notch to a non factory sniper they would have replicated the factory shape notch. I would never pay any type of premium for a "field notch." I would actually pay less because they are impossible to authenticate. Even if someone claims they came out of a crate like that.

On a separate note, thanks Rupreht for your study of shooting the SVT and the info you share here. It is appreciated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
Pavlin: I don't doubt that you're correct- just seems to me the factory notch is a rather complex form and on my 4 examples very consistently machined relative to a datum on the side rails. I can't see field armourers being able to (or caring to) duplicate that and, if they could, I guess there'd be no way of knowing if it was field or factory. It would be interesting to see an example that someone feels strongly to be a field-made notch- maybe one that was on a rifle taken directly out of a newly opened shipping crate by the current owner. I agree with msniper- no way to assign value to something that can't be verified (and thanks for the kind words).

Ruprecht
 

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I'm sure armorers had a hard time replicating factory notch in the filed but they didn't have much choice. The problem is that the notch needs to have a proper width so the mount could have some space to slide back and forth every time the rifle is fired. When rifle is fired inertia kicks the rifle back, mount shifts forward, buffer spring of the mount compresses therefor absorbing the recoil. When recoil inertia is gone the buffer spring decompresses therefor bringing the mount to the rearward position right where it started before shot. With those bubba notches the mount simply have no room to slide and destroy that notch pretty quick as the cross pin will hammer on the notch edges every time the rifle is fired and at one moment will fly straight to shooters forehead/eye/face/cheek in the heat of the battle. So they had to do it just like the factory ones.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Pavlin: For my replica sniper I simply used a small round file the same dimension as the base of the pin so the scope mount is, indeed, locked solidly in place. 500 rounds later absolutely no deformation of the notch. Personally I doubt that the buffer function really accomplished anything other than damaging notches as the pin is allowed to slam either the front or rear, depending on how strong the spring is. Recoil of the SVT is light courtesy of the muzzle brake so protection of the scope from recoil is not an issue. If you're going to use a mount with the buffer just carefully check where the pin sits relative to the radius in the notch. I assume the real, original mounts likely fit perfectly such that the profile of the pin contacted the notch properly. No way for me to check as I'm sure I'll never be lucky enough to stumble on a real, original mount. On the subject of "bubba" notches, I've seen more than a few bubba attempts to replicate the original profile (ie room to slide). Key message is: if you have a real sniper SVT and you wish to shoot it with repro mount, be careful to avoid damaging your notch. In some cases, notching a less collectable rifle might be the better way to go ( again, easy for me to say with rifles I payed as little as $200.00 for).

Ruprecht
 

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I have personally seen a "Field Notch" SVT Sniper that was fresh out of the crate with the first large batch that came into my local Canadian Tire (think, Walmart without the grocery section).

It looked exactly as described by Ruprecht in a previous post. Small shallow notch that would work almost perfectly with one of the repro mounts we get up here in Canada... of course I have no photographic evidence to show, and even still, ya'll would still need to take my word for it. I passed it up because amongst the other 10 crates of SVTs they had brought in, I found 2 factory snipers ('41 and '42 Tulas). So I bought those instead as a field notch can never be verified IMO... Also, paid the standard price for those snipers too at the time $240 Syrup Bucks a piece , which is like 1 American Benjamin....

But I have made 2 "Field Notch" snipers myself as Range shooters so I can keep my 3 original snipers in good condition (it was through reading warnings from Ruprecht and Horilka that I didn't shoot my originals with the repro mounts). And like Ruprecht said, the spring loaded buffer seems to serve almost no function with the repro mounts and a shallow repro or "Field" notch. No damage to the receiver or field notch so far, but only about 100 rounds downrange so far....

I should look into altering my repro mounts on my original snipers like Ruprecht did though.

Cheers!

Pavlin: For my replica sniper I simply used a small round file the same dimension as the base of the pin so the scope mount is, indeed, locked solidly in place. 500 rounds later absolutely no deformation of the notch. Personally I doubt that the buffer function really accomplished anything other than damaging notches as the pin is allowed to slam either the front or rear, depending on how strong the spring is. Recoil of the SVT is light courtesy of the muzzle brake so protection of the scope from recoil is not an issue. If you're going to use a mount with the buffer just carefully check where the pin sits relative to the radius in the notch. I assume the real, original mounts likely fit perfectly such that the profile of the pin contacted the notch properly. No way for me to check as I'm sure I'll never be lucky enough to stumble on a real, original mount. On the subject of "bubba" notches, I've seen more than a few bubba attempts to replicate the original profile (ie room to slide). Key message is: if you have a real sniper SVT and you wish to shoot it with repro mount, be careful to avoid damaging your notch. In some cases, notching a less collectable rifle might be the better way to go ( again, easy for me to say with rifles I payed as little as $200.00 for).

Ruprecht
 
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