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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Have an odd one here..

Enfield N0.4 MkI Siamese marked, 1942 mfg, war expedient features.

On the metal, where it would come into contact with wood is a yellow coating. Its not tacky and not cosmoline. I have seen a lot of Enfield finishes but this one has me baffled. It has to be a Siam applied coating since its over the restamped Siam barrel SN.

Anyone see this before?
 

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Paint? It was a wartime practice to paint in lieu of grease for corrosion protection. Seems likely that the Thais might have picked up on the practice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I believe it could be.. Funny thing is whomever painted it left their fingerprints on the barrel. None of my other Siamese / Thai rifles had this "paint" which is why it struck me as odd. Question is was it a temporary preservative or a permanent rust protector?
 

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I've seen both green and tan paint on the metal under the wood. Some of my No4's, a No1 MKIII and one P14 have paint under the woodline. I think two are tan and rest is green. I was told this was for humid climates, kept it from rusting under the wood line. I think one of my Siamese has the tan paint like yours. Does you forestock have the Ishy screw?
 

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Yes it has the screw in the forestock. None of my Japanese origin Siamese rifles have this paint or any of my other Enfield/Metford's. odd..
 

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I've seen tan/khaki paint and Ishy screws on India rifles in the past. Is it possible the sale of rifles might have gone to Siam through India? It was common to do so with the Asian colonies and protectorates back in the earlier days, so why not follow a similar logistic?
 

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That paint looks sort of like yellow zinc chromate, a common war time anti corrosion paint. It was usually spray painted on aircraft.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Yes I am sure.. The Chukra's are stamped on the Stock (Cartouche) and receiver. Rifle is all matching and from what I can tell the screws were still staked. Stock has traces of the anti corrosion paint so it was assembled while still curing and not a replacement since painted, numbered in Siam.
 

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Thai Savage

Yes I am sure.. The Chukra's are stamped on the Stock (Cartouche) and receiver. Rifle is all matching and from what I can tell the screws were still staked. Stock has traces of the anti corrosion paint so it was assembled while still curing and not a replacement since painted, numbered in Siam.
I have an identical rifle: paint visible beneath the wood line, staked king screw, transverse screw in forend etc.
 
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