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In a nutshell: Local pawn has a Marlin-built Sears Ted Williams .30-30 lever action carbine. The stock is black walnut and in extremely good shape. I would need to refinish the wood and clean up and reblue the metal. Asking price is $179.

My great pleasure, after spending time with my granddaughter, is cleaning up old rifles. The milsurps are just cleaned and preserved. Old civilian iron gets the thorough treatment.

Would you pay $179 for such a rifle?
 

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This isn't a commemorative. Ted Williams was a brand name for a great deal of hunting and fishing gear sold by Sears in the '50s, 60s, and possibly later.

Oops, sorry, Ted. I'm sure you know this. Do you have a .30-30 lever action in your collection?
 

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I have always wanted to get a lever action 30-30 just because of their looks. I might buy it just to have one in the collection.
 

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Just my opinion here:

As long as your interest is in a good, shootable, lever action, go ahead and get it. It is not a collectable, and may never be worth much more than you paid for it, but it is a well-made and reliable firearm.
 

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Mr. Flashy Pants
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Doh, I thought it was a commemorative, but now that you mention it I remember that Sears, Western Auto, Montgomery Wards, etc. all used to have these "house brands" with sports and movie personalities names.

I don't have a lever action .30-30 in my collection although I grew up hunting with one. It was a Winchester post-'64 so I didn't bother to grab it when my dad died. By then I had already bought a Marlin 1894C (I think) in .44 Magnum as my "brush gun". I chose that model because I like the straight stock and felt it had a more "western" look. I chose the caliber because I also had/have a Ruger Super Redhawk 9.5" barrel in .44 Magnum and figured they made a nice companion set. One of these days I'm going to pick up on of the Ruger "Deerfield" semi-autos in .44 Magnum to go with them.

I also have a Winchester M1895 Russian contract in 7.62x54r, so I guess you can say I have a "30 caliber lever gun". :D

I guess if refinishing it is your thing then it wouldn't be a bad deal. Myself, I'd look for something slightly used, but almost new for a little more money at the gun shows. That's how I've acquired nearly all my "modern" firearms, often a good bit under retail.
 

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It will likely never be worth more than the current asking price. If that doesn't bother you, and the gun is already mechanically perfect, it's as good a project for the sake of a project as any. If there is anything mechanical wrong, I wouldn't give $79 for it. Too many year old 30/30s get sold at a huge loss right after deer season every year to mess with a problem child. Generally, "store brand" guns hold nothing but cheap shooter value.
 

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Just my opinion here:

As long as your interest is in a good, shootable, lever action, go ahead and get it. It is not a collectable, and may never be worth much more than you paid for it, but it is a well-made and reliable firearm.

Radom said:
It will likely never be worth more than the current asking price. If that doesn't bother you, and the gun is already mechanically perfect, it's as good a project for the sake of a project as any. If there is anything mechanical wrong, I wouldn't give $79 for it. Too many year old 30/30s get sold at a huge loss right after deer season every year to mess with a problem child. Generally, "store brand" guns hold nothing but cheap shooter value.
I agree with both of the above.

I am looking for just such an animal to give to my son for his birthday.

.02



"Ted Williams Commemorative"

 

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$179 seems like a fair price for a Marlin lever-action .30-.30 in good shape.

You probably know that the more collectible lever action .30-.30's are the older Marlins and the pre-64 Wicnhesters. Those start at something like $400, and may go up 10% in value over the next 10 years. So you're saving over $200 - if you're looking for a good-looking shooter I think the price is fair.
 

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IMHO, not a bad price. Certainly a better rifle that a Win 94 in all respects other than collector interest.

I wouldn't consider it a collectible in any way though. Just a good tool. As the attached 100 yard targets show, they can group decently.
 

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What's so funny? Don't you read American Rifleman? They'll slap just about anybody's name on a firearm and call it a "commemorative" and try to sell it at 5 times it's value.
I'm still surprised you didn't get that "G-Man" commemorative Thompson that I told you about. :rolleyes:
 

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The Sears lever guns sold under the "Ted Williams" name were quality firearms manufactured by Winchester.They are the same as a Winchester Model 94.It is a good price.

Stan
 

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Actually, that is a pretty good price considering that Marlins of the pre-crossbolt safety vintage bring $275 + around here. In fact I would not have one with that ridiculous, lawyer feature. So yes, I would buy it if in good mechanical condition and I wanted a lever action shooter.
 

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The Sears lever guns sold under the "Ted Williams" name were quality firearms manufactured by Winchester.They are the same as a Winchester Model 94.It is a good price.

Stan
Sears sold firearms manufactured by Winchester, Marlin, Savage, Stevens, Springfield and probably some others. It was all about the lowest bidder and regional preferences. The Ted Williams label was simply a sears trademark. I had a pump shotgun made by Stevens and a .22 made by Remington when I was a kid. Both were "Ted Williams" trademarked.
 

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I'm waiting for someone to ask, "Who is Ted Williams?"

Mark, get it and redo it as a gift for your Grandaughter when she is old enough. Then have the pleasure of teaching her how to shoot it. That's at least good for a double. (After you tell her who Ted Williams was and take her to a minor league game near your home--triple or a home run.)
 

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Mr. Flashy Pants
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I'm waiting for someone to ask, "Who is Ted Williams?"

Mark, get it and redo it as a gift for your Grandaughter when she is old enough. Then have the pleasure of teaching her how to shoot it. That's at least good for a double. (After you tell her who Ted Williams was and take her to a minor league game near your home--triple or a home run.)
That's what Wikipedia is for. I confirmed my suspicion that he played baseball.
 
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