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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Still jamming. BUT, not as often. This time, out of 6 full mags, probably 3 had jams, and multiple ones. Same as described before: spent case gets stuck in between round trying to chamber and the gas piston. A real pain to clear. Was shooting bulgy light ball, and finished with 10 rds of wolf modern commercial. The wolf did not jam, and 2 of the remaining 5 bulhies did not jam. So, who knows? Will be shooting it May 6th, again, so will report back then. I still love this rifle....oh, and it was somehow still zeroed, and I screwed it up with the last mag trying to slightly adjust it. Ended up turning the wrong drum, and got it off, so its back to square one. Had it zeroed nicely before.....

Just looks cool with a bayo attached.....
 

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It is good that you still love that rifle because by now it is probably too late to return it and get your money back from Centerfire . Now your only choice is to try to fix it . Maybe sooner or later you would find the problem .
 

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I didn't catch the original thread, but here are some thoughts based on owning one of these:

1-is it broken in? The thick parkerizing on these creates lots of friction, which would slow the bolt and lead to cycling issues.
2-does it jam with every mag you own? just one, all but one, etc?
3-is the action straight? Pull the recoil spring out of the gun, and cycle the bolt by hand. Does it move freely, or does it bind?
4-does the ejector look long enough? It it clearly hitting the rim of the cases as the retract?
5-have you stripped the bolt and cleaned out the extractor? Drift out the pins, clean the spring and spring pocket...
6-is your gas port clear? take a small drill bit or nail and see if there are burrs or dirt that are lowering the gas pressure.
7-does the hammer exhibit wear in one spot, rather than along the whole face? if so, that friction might be slowing the action
8-when you cycle fired cases by hand, do they eject?

C
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Probably not completely broken in yet.....only about 200-230 rds out of it as of now.
Only own one mag, and it feeds fine.
Action appears straight.
Yes, ejector makes positive contact with the case rim.
Have not yet stripped the bolt, but will try before shooting it again.
Gas port is clear.
Hammer looks fine, and it exhibiting wear evenly.
When hand cycling the action, they di a similiar thing OCCASSIONALLY.

I am going to shoot it again, and see if it losens up. It did jam less this time, so we'll see.

These are pics of what the jamming was like, and I remember the advice given in the earlier thread: I am just going to wait and see if things improve before taking a 'knife' to it...
 

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4-does the ejector look long enough? It it clearly hitting the rim of the cases as the retract?
5-have you stripped the bolt and cleaned out the extractor? Drift out the pins, clean the spring and spring pocket...
6-is your gas port clear? take a small drill bit or nail and see if there are burrs or dirt that are lowering the gas pressure.


C
I would for sure go with above 3 points.
and I would add another one:
just for grins, lightly oil your rounds next time you are shooting. Meaning: oily rag, dump your surplus rounds on it and just kind of half-heartetly swoosh or whipe your live rounds. It will help with the extraction, especially if your chamber is a bit rough and catching on the cases.
your symptoms are NOT uncommon for a new PSL.
 

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I wouldnt oil any rounds. Oil does burn and it could create more chamber pressure which could be bad. If you have seen it happen its a bad thing!
 

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Have used Johnson's Paste wax on many of my MG rounds on guns that need lubricated cartridges. Like the Type 99 HMG, Type 96 and the Breda Model 30 among others. Let it dry for a few minutes and your good to go.
 

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Still think you need to slightly tweak the ejector as well. However, before your next range session, break down the bolt and clean out the cosmoline that's likely hiding under the extractor. That can cause stovepipes as well.

I see another issue as well in your second pic. The little lever that holds the gas piston tube in place is too far down. It should be stopped in the midway notch (45 degree position).
 

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Still think you need to slightly tweak the ejector as well. However, before your next range session, break down the bolt and clean out the cosmoline that's likely hiding under the extractor. That can cause stovepipes as well.

I see another issue as well in your second pic. The little lever that holds the gas piston tube in place is too far down. It should be stopped in the midway notch (45 degree position).
That doesn`t means anything . Because I installed the DSMLb handguard adapter kit and the SVD handguards , the lever was brushing against the SVD handguards on its regular position , so I moved it to be just straight down and it works fine .
 

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Lightly oiling rounds is actually a common practice in semi-autos, most notably in swedish army and their AG-42 rifles. It basically assists case extraction.
 

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Lightly oiling rounds is actually a common practice in semi-autos, most notably in swedish army and their AG-42 rifles. It basically assists case extraction.
Never read that in any instructions that came with any weapon system Ive used semi auto or full auto. I was taught in Master Gunner Course that the practice was dangerous and could lead to over pressure in the chamber. Have seen that done on a M249 on a zero range, Gunner was medivaced with injuries. Cause: he was using oil to lube his rounds chamber heated up and bam gun blew up in his face.

Sounds like the wolf ammo is working better than the bulgy. I have heard on the boards from some other memebers that ammo pickyness is an issue.
 

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These rounds are clearly extracting, that doesn't seem to be the issue. They aren't ejecting, which has a different set of issues, some of which may overlap.

Either the bolt assembly isn't traveling fast enough to eject the round when it strikes the ejector, or the round isn't being gripped firmly by the extractor when being ejected, or the ejector is the wrong shape/size.
 

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+1., ejection issue.
Usually gas or ejector issue
You need to observe the ejection performance on rounds that do eject successfully.
Do they strike the outside receiver cover (normal generally), do they eject 8 to 10 feet from the weapon or farther (normal) or are they falling shortly after ejection?
Have you "fished" the gas port opening in the barrel for proper size/diameter and clearance? Normal .075" although undergassed would be abnormal., but??

Since you fired Wolf and it performed (heavy ball?) that does point toward a gas issue.

Does the ejector look straight, clean and not burred or deformed?

Does the extractor hold a round firmly?

A bit of observation and trial and error. It is a pretty simple operating system.., but not always easy to pin down right off and without handling the fireram.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I will try in a few days when I have the time trying these. Sometimes, randomly, it will throw the case 10-15 feet, occassionally, it dropped a few RIGHT NEXT TO the gun on the bench. The ejector looks fine, no burs or anything. I am nervous about dissassembling the extractor, but will. I will get some brake cleaner, pull it apart, and clean it thoroughly. And shouldn't you be able to put a round on the bolt, and the bolt and extractor hold the round on the bolt face?
 

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Its really easy to take the bolt apart. The first time will be hard, because they probably parked the thing while it was already assembled. Thus, the parkerizing will act a bit like glue, making the pins harder than normal to drift out. Once you get them out the first time though, its a breeze. Use a small screwdriver or jewelers screwdrivers to scrape all of the crap out. It will be a mix of rust, blasting media, grease, park solution, and soot. Scrub the spring as well.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ix8g8TLKGpI

You will get this sorted out, and you'll love the gun. Mine is a dream, and works every time. At least you aren't this guy:
http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_4_64/140368__ARCHIVED_THREAD____My_Red_Jacket_special_PSL.html&page=1
 

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No oil should be placed on cartridges due to increased thrust on the bolt. The cases are supposed to be gripping the chamber wall at the moment of ignition untill the pressure falls.

As has been stated, it's an ejection issue and not stuck cases.
 

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No oil should be placed on cartridges due to increased thrust on the bolt. The cases are supposed to be gripping the chamber wall at the moment of ignition untill the pressure falls.

As has been stated, it's an ejection issue and not stuck cases.
Thank you. That suggestion was stupid as $%$%$%$%blank.

What grain are the Wolf commercial you are shooting?
 
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