Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just bought a short sword ? from a woman that said her father brought it home in ww2. it has a 20 inch blade, but on the tang is alot of writing, I took some pics of it & wonder if anyone could read it. the tassel or cord I'am not sure of? any help would be appreciated. bob
 

·
Silver Bullet member
Joined
·
15,639 Posts
How about a picture or five of the blade and scabbard?
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
6,110 Posts
Show us photos of the whole blade and the scabbard too. Nice lookiing tsuba for sure.
The mei reads "Takada-ju Fujiwara Hisayuki", a smith from the Bungo or Hoshu province Takada lineage, but unfortunately no info on the smith Hisayuki himself. An obscure smith not listed on references.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks for the info, I just got back on & its going on 12 midnight , I will take some pics & send as soon as I can. thanks again bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Short Sword Pics

I took some quick pics. the scabbard has 4 holes on 1 side, not all thee way thru? its was apart & a few pieces missing, hope the pics help. bob
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
4,329 Posts
It is a "Wakazashi", and judging from tang color is from the 15th or 16th century (the temper line is in the style of older blades). Throw the cord out... it is from Grandma's curtains and not a Japanese sword.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Brad for the reply, was checking the web sites, found that he was a member of bungo takada school, app. + - 1860 , his temper line was straight. I thought the cord was a curtain cord, had to make sure. after 2 am here, got to go to sleep. thanks again bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,023 Posts
I did some looking but didnt find much...if this is the same smith: hoshu takada-ju fujiwara Hisayuki..Bunsei period, 1818-1829 typically has a straight temper line.Everything I saw was approx 20" short swords. Found a picture somewhere:
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
4,329 Posts
The tsuka and tsuba are nice looking. A tang that is nearly black as yours appears to be is normally older than 1860s (would be a light brown as in the other example above my post). GENERAL rule of thumb is light chocolate brown is shin-shinto, darker brown is shinto, black is koto. The color and surface on this one says shinto (1600s) to me. There are a myriad of sub-periods for experts... on older blades like this I am little more than an book-read novice with a few swords passing through my hands as an owner. Most Wakizashis in this condition without a more active temper line are going $500-$700 on Ebay.
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
6,110 Posts
Brad, the mekugi-ana edge is too fresh to be a koto or a 1600's shinto sword. I understand your rule of thumb of aging through tang patina, but taking only the patina into account could be deceiving, since anything over close to 200 years old could have gone through anything to accelerate the tang rust. It's not only the patina, but the tang metal surface, the mei freshness and the ana freshness all needs to be examined. Also there are faked patina' s and surface condition in addition to gi-meis out there, so beware.
Although this smith Hisayuki is too obscure to be a gi-mei.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
293 Posts
mei "freshness"

Edokko:

Excellent points. FWIW, the mei might not be that fresh, looks like it may have been enhanced for the picture with lacquer stix, white-out, chalk, what ever.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter · #12 ·
short sword

thanks guys for all the info, I did put chalk on the [ mei] ? to take pictures, it did not show up w/out it that good, hope this helps some? thanks bob
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Short Sword [ Wakazashi ]

I been checking the web sites on japanese swords trying to find anything on - Fugiwara Hisayuki , one site had this. Fujiwara Hisayuki was a member bungo takada school, in [Hawleys ] 3 records for him after kawai Hisayuki , his 186 active around 1854. his 187 active 1863, sagami , signed Fujiwara Hisayuki , rated 10 points . hope this is some help? now I'am not sure of the book? [ volume VI , kodogul part 1 ] PAGE 247 - 316 - 338 . HISAYUKI . I don't have these books, any help would be appreciate. bob
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
4,329 Posts
Won't argue the contradictions

Brad, the mekugi-ana edge is too fresh to be a koto or a 1600's shinto sword. I understand your rule of thumb of aging through tang patina, but taking only the patina into account could be deceiving, since anything over close to 200 years old could have gone through anything to accelerate the tang rust. It's not only the patina, but the tang metal surface, the mei freshness and the ana freshness all needs to be examined. Also there are faked patina' s and surface condition in addition to gi-meis out there, so beware.
Although this smith Hisayuki is too obscure to be a gi-mei.
Can't argue with the crispness of the mekugi-ana edge, but would have to see it in person to write it off completely as an older sword. As I said, my knowlege on older swords is at the novice-plus level and I haven't handled enough to make absolute (or highly detailed, or even always accurate) pronouncements. The good news is I can admit that... '-)
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
6,110 Posts
Brad, well I'm in the same degree as you, only advantage is I can read some of the "mei" and the Japanese reference books. A true sword reading master can tell the age and name of th sword smith by just exmining the blade with the tang blind wrapped. They actually have competitions like that, similar to a blinded wine label competition. It comes from not only read study but examining countless swords real and fake for years and years. I'm like....a zillion miles away from that level.
 

·
Silver Bullet member
Joined
·
600 Posts
If you need true identification of makers name for authenticity, just short of NBTHK (Most recognized Japanese Sword Organization) go to ricecracker.com owned by Mike Yamazaki. Mike is (Japanese American 3rd generation) the only non-Japanese to win the NBTHK kantei-Kai (sword identification contest). In the mid 80's I had the opportunity to attend a smaller local Kantei at Okisato Fujishiro's. The best of the best were there, I've never thought that a outsider would win the national contest. Also Jimmy Hayashi, he is my sword polisher, very nice and helpful person (415-922-0618) get his email address and send him come good close up photos.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Discussion Starter · #17 ·
short sword [ wakazashi ]

I like to thank all for the replys, it was appreciated very much. I always collected military items, but japanese swords was one I did not know much of, I get them every so often from vets or vets family. I had a friend that collected them, knew alot about them also, but he died. thanks again bob
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top