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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I've always loved old West weapons. I currently own a Winchester 1873 Deluxe Sporter .357, Winchester 1892 .357, Taylors Alaskan 1892 .357, and Winchester 1894 musket (NRA Centennial).

I do own a Ruger New Vaquero, but I'd like something a little more authentic, and I have my eye on the Taylor's Runnin' Iron. (Previously I was looking at the Uberti El Patron Grizzly Paw)

They have 3 models (normal, tuned, and short stroke), each in 3 different materials (case hardened, black, and stainless), and I'm unsure which would be better.

I LOVE the look of case hardened old west revolvers, but I have a case harden rifle, and it's very difficult to prevent from rusting. Would this be true of the Taylors revolver too if i get it with a case hardened finish? Would black or stainless be better?

And what's better between tuned and short stroke? The told me the tuned hammer was a 20% lighter pull, but had the full range vs the short stroke which is the same pull as the normal hammer, but has 20% less distance to travel.

Where are some good places for a really nice holster? (I'm left handed).
 

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As far as those two performed by Taylor's & Company, the short stroke enables the gun to fire faster. The action is polished but the spring pressure is left at the factory settings. Their 'Taylor Tuned' also polishes the action and the spring pressure is lightened which reduces the trigger pull. If you are going to be carrying the gun around the field, I would not suggest the tuned version as the trigger pull may be too light.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
As far as those two performed by Taylor's & Company, the short stroke enables the gun to fire faster. The action is polished but the spring pressure is left at the factory settings. Their 'Taylor Tuned' also polishes the action and the spring pressure is lightened which reduces the trigger pull. If you are going to be carrying the gun around the field, I would not suggest the tuned version as the trigger pull may be too light.
Would you elaborate?
By carrying around the field, do you mean going to SASS events with the revolver in my holster? Or do you mean something else?
Do you mean too light as in I might have a negligent discharge?
 

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I have handled a few Taylor Tuned revolvers,
they do a great job, the trigger is noticeably lighter and smoother than factory,

sold one to a friend that enjoys range time with it with out trouble
 

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The color-cased gun will be vulnerable to surface rusting, the black finish less so, but also vulnerable unless normal precautions are taken (I have a number of blued or black finished handguns, none of then are rusty, because I take the normal and traditional precautions). Stainless will be the most resistant to getting rusty. And with stag or imitation ivory grips will make a good BBQ gun. Or just a useful carry gun.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I have handled a few Taylor Tuned revolvers,
they do a great job, the trigger is noticeably lighter and smoother than factory,

sold one to a friend that enjoys range time with it with out trouble
So are you suggesting that over the short stroked?
Correct, with the tuned the trigger is very light and goes off very easily. If you are going to SASS events, I would go with an un-modified gun or the short stroke as that is made for SASS events.
Why wouldn't the tuned be good for SASS events? Is there a rule about hammer weight?
 

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Get the Taylors Tuned you will NOT be sorry. My last set of revolvers are those. OMG what a wonderful difference.
And have Shotgun Boogie do your SXS. He took my Cimarron SXS and made that thing drop so fast. It was a wreck when I bought it new, tough to open, and well
that's another topic...the Tuned actions from Taylors are like butter and there's no rule saying that you can't use them.
 

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No, there isn't a rule about hammer weight that I know of. The trigger pull is very light. My friend has a Taylor & Company Smoke Wagon which has been Taylor Tuned and the trigger pull averages 1# 11 oz. It is like all you have to do is place your finger on the trigger to fire it. I would not recommend that light of a trigger pull if I were to be competing in action shooting. Target shooting, yes. Action shooting, no.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
No, there isn't a rule about hammer weight that I know of. The trigger pull is very light. My friend has a Taylor & Company Smoke Wagon which has been Taylor Tuned and the trigger pull averages 1# 11 oz. It is like all you have to do is place your finger on the trigger to fire it. I would not recommend that light of a trigger pull if I were to be competing in action shooting. Target shooting, yes. Action shooting, no.
Ok...why not during action shooting?
 

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When shooting SASS events with factory Winchesters and Colts with reduced but still powerful loads I would chuckle at the “gamers” and their quick shooting guns. Betcha’ you would never find a short stroke kit back in 1880.
 

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Ok...why not during action shooting?
While I do not have any experience in participating in SASS events, I would think that with one's adrenaline rushing an ounces light trigger pull may result in firing the gun before one meant it to. I have a rifle with a set trigger and boy! That thing seems to go off right as I start to place my finger on the trigger!
 

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While I do not have any experience in participating in SASS events, I would think that with one's adrenaline rushing an ounces light trigger pull may result in firing the gun before one meant it to. I have a rifle with a set trigger and boy! That thing seems to go off right as I start to place my finger on the trigger!
A set trigger can be adjusted too light for easy control, yes. A 1 pound, 11 ounce trigger isn't too light for good control in my (something over fifty years) experience, but others may feel otherwise, and they are welcome to their own views and experiences. I once had an opportunity to so some shooting with a Hammerli Free Pistol, with a trigger adjusted to approximately one ounce. That is too light for easy control - you'd have to do a lot of shooting and practice to avoid taking the shot before you were ready. Or I would, others might be better than I am at trigger control.

Which action (or finish) to get seems to me to depend on what purpose is intended, but I would be inclined to go with the color-cased finish and tuned action. But that is me and my own preferences.
 
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