Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
2,347 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
:?I know that the half moon clips were developed in 1917 to go with the S&W model 1917 revolvers. But does anyone know when the full moon clips first came on the scene? I cannot seem to find anything that references when they first came out. Even my 1940 Shooter’s Bible only shows a half moon clip. I would have thought that someone would have figured out the full moon clip by then.

Thanks in advance for any info. I was just curious about this and thought someone here might know.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
450 Posts
Full moon clips are a recent invention. In the 1980s the American Rifleman had a letter from a fellow describing how he made some full moon clips. My Dad and I tried it, but loading the 6th round from the inside was too hard. We got with my machinist scoutmaster and he made us a number of blanks, and we cut the clips from the outside. We should have patented them. A few months later the American rifleman had a advertisment for full moon clips, someone else was inspired no doubt.

I bougth surplus WW1 half moon clips for $5.00 per hundred at a Kane county gunshow in 1985. As the US military dropped the revolvers from frontline service after WW1, the clips were still circulating as cheap surplus even then. The 1950s-1960s outfits that trimmed Webleys to use the .45ACP and clips no doubt had plenty of clips on hand, and no need.

Now the IPSC types have picked up the system for sport shooting, Ruger made (makes?) a 9mm revolver to use full moon clips, and others.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,469 Posts
The reason the military never tried a full moon clip was the difficulty in carrying them. The half moon clips fit into a special carrier and lay flat against the users side. A full moon clip would have stuck out significantly and been harder to carry.

After WWI, the 1917 was only issued during WWII as an emergency limited issue item, and no one saw any need to develop something that really wasn't needed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,743 Posts
I tried half moon and full moon clips in my S&W 1955. As a result I switched to .45 auto rim. The clips bend, stretch, cut your fingers and get lost in the weeds. I have several half mooners laying around in the bottom of my shooting box, I never use them anymore.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,326 Posts
Good morning gents,

I own a S&W 625 revolver (.45acp). It takes half moon as well as full moon clips.
For casual target shooting I don't bother with the clips as you can easily pick out the empties (from the cylinder) one by one.
For practical shooting the clips, especially full moon, are just perfect; even easier to carry and quicker reload than with a speedloader (in 357mag fi).
.45 autorim brass is way too expensive.
It's my favorite revolver.

Best regards, A
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
140 Posts
MG08 is correct: I was working in a gun store in '88 when S&W made a big fuss about shipping full moon clips with their 625s. I tell you what, the old guys who were revolver shooters thought that they were quite nifty - we wound up selling quite a lot of full moons to old fellas who liked their .45 ACP from a wheel gun.

A whippersnapper at the time (I'd just graduated from college), I didn't get why anyone would want to shoot .45 ACP from a revolver. Now that I've got some mileage (and the wisdom that comes with the bumps in that road) on me, I pure-D love my 625-3. I mostly shoot the ACP rounds in it because the brass is so bloody common and I can use the rounds in my semiautos as well should I want to, but I have to say that the .45 AR has got to be my favorite cartridge to reload. Short throw of the lever, easy to do because of the wide circumference, and easy to manipulate in my clutzy fingers.

Like Andrey, I really like my 625. So does my (non-shooter) wife: she has no problems shooting the .45 ACP, and she likes the easy reload that the full-moons provide. It's our house gun.
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
2,347 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I know they existed in the late 60’s early 70’s as I was using them then.
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top