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Check out my album for pictures. I just purchased this mint, museum grade gun from my grandfather -I can remember it sitting in the rafters of his basement as a child. He had the original paperwork and envelope from the arsenal (but no box) dated January 1961. The gun is about as close to mint re-arsenal as you can get. The parkerization shows almost no wear from closing the bolt. Gun unfortunately has a Remington stock that is fortunately nearly perfect. Marked R.A. and FJA as well as the arsenal RRA overstamp which is the arsenal the gun came from. There are some additional stamps near the trigger on the spine including a boxed P and a boxed 51. The bolt root is also marked R which I assume is Remington. Would be nice if they came matching but beggars cant be choosers... Metal is correct SC with rare 6 groove barrel dated an early 2-43.
The gun and wood are quite dry but no rust! I'll put some CLR on the metal - any ideas for the stock - I'm not going to coat it with anything although I am concerned about long term stability. I'd like my sons to have this family heriloom and the M1 carbine also pictured.

Also, thoughts on value for insurance purposes? Not everyday you find the paperwork with something like this in mint condition.
 

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"any ideas for the stock"

Put a few drops of Raw Linseed Oil on you fingers and rub in well. if the stock absorbs all the oil put on a few more drops and keep going until you have covered all the wood with a rubbed in coat. The oil drys slowly so do this when the gun can "rest" for a few weeks after an application.

Regards,

Jim
Check it from time to time but you probably won't need to do this more than once a year
 

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"any ideas for the stock"

Put a few drops of Raw Linseed Oil on you fingers and rub in well. if the stock absorbs all the oil put on a few more drops and keep going until you have covered all the wood with a rubbed in coat. The oil drys slowly so do this when the gun can "rest" for a few weeks after an application.

Regards,

Jim
Check it from time to time but you probably won't need to do this more than once a year
Sparky:

I must politely disagree with Jim. Don't put any linseed oil or anything else on your stock. Once removed from the basement environment and kept in a "normal" residential space with customary temperatures and humidity levels, the moisture content of the wood will slowly, very slowly stabilize.

Wood does not need to be fed or nourished. It needs to be maintained in a stable and friendly environment. The temperatures and humidity levels that a normal person would find comfortable are perfect for the wood.

At the risk of contradicting myself, if you must treat the wood with something, try Howard's Feed-n-Wax. I have not used it personally, but it is recommended by several people whose opinion I respect.
 

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Boiled linseed oil is good for the wood. It is what the wood was finished with originally. If you want to preserve the gun for long term storage remove it from the stock and grease all the metal parts.
 

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surface cells are damaged when bone dry!:tisk:
a little linseed oil will stop deterioration and fill in fractured dry cells, lubricating wood and protecting from scrapes bruises and from oils and cleaners used on metal
this dint touch the wood has caused many a collectible loose "functional value." supporting the original purpose of the stocks integrity:thumbsup:<><dk
 

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Rick;

My price is based on a current "dip" in the market. About a year ago, 03A3s with paper seemed to bring $1k on the auction sites. Lately, most 03A3s are sitting around unless original condition from recent observations; greeks are not selling at all. They are also down locally at the shows I go to.
 

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"any ideas for the stock"

Put a few drops of Raw Linseed Oil on you fingers and rub in well. if the stock absorbs all the oil put on a few more drops and keep going until you have covered all the wood with a rubbed in coat. The oil drys slowly so do this when the gun can "rest" for a few weeks after an application.


Regards,

Jim
Check it from time to time but you probably won't need to do this more than once a year
+1 .....Raw Linseed oil is better than anything. The new BLO has so many driers and additives it's nothing like the original oil. The Brits finished all their SMLE's in raw Linseed oil and it worked well for 100 years. JMHO. Regards, Rick.
 

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If you use raw linseed oil put very, very thin coat and rub into wood. Since it is raw and has no driers in can take awhile to dry. If you put it on to thick it wont dry and be sticky
I would use BLO, nothing wrong with it. Easier, faster to use. I have used it on over 30 surplus USGI stocks and it always comes out perfect
 

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I use both BLO and raw and don't see a lot of difference. BLO is much easier to locate. I always apply in thin coats. Apply by hand, then wait for a half hour or so and then gently wipe off the excess. Repeat. The idea is to obtain a slight satin sheen.

I tried slopping on raw linseed oil in my early days of gun collecting and let it dry - the stock looked like it had been varnished!
 
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