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I got this one 20 yrs ago and it was just pretty and looked good to my unknowing eyes on 1903A3's. My limited research afterwards seemed to say it went through OG but was essentially new so it was stamped and stored. Having it out recently for its first photo op I noted the parkerized magazine floor plate/trigger guard assembly and thought opps, refurbed after all. Sakorick's recent question on parkerized bands was the final straw so--Question: did SC use parkerized trigger housings in this serial range or at all with original production? Thanks.
 

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I got this one 20 yrs ago and it was just pretty and looked good to my unknowing eyes on 1903A3's. My limited research afterwards seemed to say it went through OG but was essentially new so it was stamped and stored. Having it out recently for its first photo op I noted the parkerized magazine floor plate/trigger guard assembly and thought opps, refurbed after all. Sakorick's recent question on parkerized bands was the final straw so--Question: did SC use parkerized trigger housings in this serial range or at all with original production? Thanks.
That's an easy one......the triggerguard and floorplate should be parked. The bolt and parts should be blued and the bolt marked with an X on top of the handle, the on/off switch parked, the stacking swivel band blued and the swivel parked, the lower band and swivel blued....I don't think anyone knows for 100% sure as there was a war going on and s*** happens. The problem with mine is that it had many SC parts exchanged with Remington ones at Rock Island. Your rifle is one that was probably inspected at RI and they just passed it to storage with no changes and hence no other marks. I was told by a source that they all went to Depot overhaul....or of course, yours could have been swiped. There was allot of that in WWII especially with pistols. I'm sure others will elaborate. Regards, Rick.

Sidebar. The stock cartouches on yours are the best I have ever seen which would lead one to believe it was issued.....they all were, but never left the arms room.
 

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SC bolts can also be unmarked... I have seen several from old collections with all SC components and no "X". But, since most folks expect an "X", many of these originals are subsequently "restored" when they trade hands.
 

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Mine also has a X marked sear. Has anyone else found X marked SC parts? I think there may be more than what the experts say. There was an excellent article in the April 2010 issue of American Rifleman by Bruce Canfield on the SC 03A3's. He was right on the money on most of his observations but I believe he missed the SC's unique firing pin knob. Regards, Rick.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Thanks guys for all responses. When I got this thing years ago there was no gunboards and I used my collector friends as a resource but bought it solo cause I thought it was good to go. When I got it out of the back of the safe, buried there because I had decided it was too nice to shoot, I got an uneasy feeling about the trigger guard because all 3 of the Remington 03's I had in the past had blue trigger guards. The bolt does have mark on the top that may be an X but really weak. The pic of the top of the bolt turned out poorly The rifle looks even better in person but its OG marked Remington twin looks better.
 

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Thanks Mike. I was curious about the bolt being original because of the square shaped safety lug. I think I found another X marked bolt with square safety lug, so I'm assuming this was another shortcut in late production rifles. Thanks for sharing, nice rifle!
 

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I don't think there is any real question... both companies had different machines and lathe settings; both set a production line process of "steps" for optimum profitability and efficeincy within the technical specification acceptable to the government. Remington, RIA and Springfield also had subtle differences in parts in 1903 production due to machine differences and settings. Look at the dished out area around the screw hole in the Remington 1903 front band/lug as an example.
 

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Some A3 firing pins are made of two pieces and some are made using three pieces. WW2 production of 03's and 03-A3's was a more or less continuous process of engineering improvements designed to increase output and lower costs. Typically the cost of minor components was calculated out to 5 places to the right of the decimal point.

As to why the differences:
Remington which had an old plant equipped with overhead shafts for driving machines received its machine tools from Springfield and Rock Island Arsenal. The Rock Island equipment was in better condition so the first 03's of the line looked very much like the last RIA's.

SC had no suitable machine tools and was selected primarily since its more inland location provided some additional security if the US had been invaded on the east coast. SC was given priority in obtaining more up-to-date machine tools. Basically SC Syracuse produced receivers and bolts and some small parts. Barrels, stocks and other small parts were made at other SC locations or by subs for eventual assembly at Syracuse.

Notwithstanding the fact that Remington parts are marked with an "R" Remington did not produce stampings at Ilion. Rear sling swivels marked "RP" (Rochester Products) are frequently seen on A3's and A4's.

Regards,

Jim
 

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