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Discussion Starter #1
Any members have their gun safes on a second story floor? My concern is the total combined weight of the safe and firearms at probaly 600 lbs. concentrated on a small 24"x24" space on wood frame 2nd floor construction.
 

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See: Wood Frame Construction Manual
2001 WFCM
http://www.awc.org/Standards/wfcm.html

The problem may be the load that the floor joists carry.
A 110 lb. woman walking in spike heels puts a much greater psi load on the floor than your safe, so the point loads won't be a problem.
Your 600 lb. Cousin Festus, trying out for the front page of the National Enquirer, likely spreads HIS load over a greater area.
You may wish to position the safe so its on 2 joists and your local library probably has the WFCM or its equivalent as a reference.
 

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You're barely over 1 lb per square inch. However, given the total weight, I would agree with Ted that it would be wise to put it next to a wall to minimize the moment-arm on any floor joists underneath. Make sure that wall is supported by another wall on the floor underneath.
 

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I agree make sure to place it on a couple floor joist over a load bearing wall and you should have no problem.
 

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Mine's in a corner on the ground (and only) floor; the room is a family room converted from a garage that had a concrete floor. Good thing too, the safe is armored like a JS II...

What if Gunwhored and Tuco were standing across from each other in the middle of the room, and were both wearing high heels? Would that be a problem?!

Poot
 

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Mine's in a corner on the ground (and only) floor; the room is a family room converted from a garage that had a concrete floor. Good thing too, the safe is armored like a JS II...

What if Gunwhored and Tuco were standing across from each other in the middle of the room, and were both wearing high heels? Would that be a problem?!

Poot
I they weren't wearing the blue thong it might be a problem. The thong makes them 35% lighter. If its the sequined ones it's 45%.
 

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I'd put it on a lower floor if possible. It would receive more protection from fire since water falls and heat rises. The basement or first floor would be a better option but I know how you feel. We don't have an ideal room on the first floor for mine without it sticking out and the man room is upstairs in the FROG. Thus, big grey box in the corner of the beautiful master bedroom. I need to get grandma to knit a safe-cozy for it. :)
 

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"What if Gunwhored and Tuco were standing across from each other in the middle of the room, and were both wearing high heels? Would that be a problem?!"

Only a problem for the slowest on the draw!
 

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I've wondered this myself; it seems to me there are 2 concerns here.

1. PSI and the break through weight for the flooring material. No issue here.
2. Overall weight and the ability of the beams to take it. This MIGHT be an issue- depending what else is in the room and resting on those beams. If you have a basement underneath, perhaps some 4X4 uprights resting on the joyces underneath? Or if not practical, at least make sure to put near a load-bearing wall.
 

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"What if Gunwhored and Tuco were standing across from each other in the middle of the room, and were both wearing high heels? Would that be a problem?!"

Only a problem for the slowest on the draw!
Not for me as long as they both didn't have dates !! :)


regards....roger
 

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I have a 500+ pound "24" gun safe on the second floor. I did place it over an outer wall for weight distribution. (The second story has a little cantilever) Have fun getting it up the stairs :)
 

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Discussion Starter #15
The only place I can put this thing is in a closet that is not near an exterior wall on the second floor. I'm just afraid of damaging the framing. As cbear said, another pain is getting the safe up the stairs:eek:. I think it will stay in the garage as I had it in the other house.
 

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One trick is to set the safe on a piece of 3/4" plywood that is larger than the bottom of the safe. In the case of a closet I would use the whole closet dimension. That spreads the load over several joists depending on the dimensions of the closet and the direction the joists run.

Cass
 

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A single piece of 3/4" plywood isn't going to distribute the weight significantly. It will help with point loads, but not enough to bring other joists into play. If you built a platform of 2x4s on edge that spanned several joists and capped it with plywood that would make a difference. I still don't think you have anything to worry about with a 24"x24" safe unless you're going to fill it top to bottom with ammo.
 

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The only place I can put this thing is in a closet that is not near an exterior wall on the second floor. I'm just afraid of damaging the framing. As cbear said, another pain is getting the safe up the stairs:eek:. I think it will stay in the garage as I had it in the other house.

A friend of mine has two safes in his (detached) garage. I never inquired about the details, but he has an alarm set up with them - which is one of those 'beam' type ones. Maybe not the best type of alarm, but better than none.
 

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A single piece of 3/4" plywood isn't going to distribute the weight significantly. It will help with point loads, but not enough to bring other joists into play.
Actually it does effectively distribute the weight. The problem is that most new construction uses lighter decking than the old construction, so you get more flexing of the deck material that can concentrate the load on just one or two joists. The 3/4" plywood is rigid enough to transfer the load over all the joists that run under the plywood. If you really want to do it right you can screw the plywood through the deck into the joists.

I agree that 600 lbs is not enough to punch through the flooring in a rapid failure, but it can cause long term deformation of joists. I have even seen that under pianos that have been left in one place for years.

Cass
 
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