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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I mean if steady force is applied and being careful with hearing and eye protection. I know they will be loud if they go bang in a concrete room. Not trying to make a stupid comment. I want to use some different ones and do not want to waste a bunch playing .338 cap gun.
 

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No don't do it! Squirt some WD-40 or a few drops of oil into the cases and let them soak over night, then they'll be safe to de-cap.
 

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Accepting that "safe" is a relative term in reloading. Yes, you can slow push the primers back out , and if there is no noticible deformation, reuse them. wear ear and eye protection.

Oil of any type will not reliably reduce the sensitivity of a primer, much less reliably inert a primer ... please consult the "Material Safety Data Sheet" for how to handle any explosive. I posted the MSDS for primers last week on another thread about primers... I guess some folks didn't see it.... alot of stuff you see posted in forums with no valid and authoritative reference to back up " Old Wives Tales" about ammo and reloading is bad and unsafe advice. Every type and size of exlposive or hazmat product in America has, as required by law, a Material Safety Data Sheet http://www.ilpi.com/msds/
 

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Accepting that "safe" is a relative term in reloading. Yes, you can slow push the primers back out , and if there is no noticible deformation, reuse them. wear ear and eye protection.
+1

I have done this many times and never had one go off. That is not to say one could not go off like this. I do it very slowly and with good eye and ear protection.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I was pretty sure it could be done as I had read someone on here doing it, but I know enough to wear ear and especially eye protection. Thank you for the hazmat sheet, AmmoSgt. I will also look up your thread as I may have overlooked it. I know the little buggersare High Explosive and very dangerous if not careful with them. Thank you for the advice.
 

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Wear a pair of gloves too...just in case it detonates. I even throw a towel over the press to slow down the fragments.
Yes, I have had a few go off while decapping them, even with a soft touch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks Chuck. I hadn't thought of that. I don't want to pick cups and anvils out of my face. I had that happen to a friend when we were kids, with a shotgun primer landing two inches deep in his cheek.
 

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Accepting that "safe" is a relative term in reloading. Yes, you can slow push the primers back out , and if there is no noticible deformation, reuse them. wear ear and eye protection.

Oil of any type will not reliably reduce the sensitivity of a primer, much less reliably inert a primer ... please consult the "Material Safety Data Sheet" for how to handle any explosive. I posted the MSDS for primers last week on another thread about primers... I guess some folks didn't see it.... alot of stuff you see posted in forums with no valid and authoritative reference to back up " Old Wives Tales" about ammo and reloading is bad and unsafe advice. Every type and size of exlposive or hazmat product in America has, as required by law, a Material Safety Data Sheet http://www.ilpi.com/msds/
That was a needlessly condescending answer. It might not be scientifically proven that oil deactivates primers. I doubt anyone has written their doctoral thesis on the matter. Empirical evidence however, is still credible among we mouthbreathing blue collar types. Furthermore, I used to be responsible for huge binders full of MSDS sheets at my previous place of employment and I have yet to encounter one that addressed safe decapping of live primers. Maybe I was reading them wrong.
 

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That was a needlessly condescending answer. It might not be scientifically proven that oil deactivates primers. I doubt anyone has written their doctoral thesis on the matter. Empirical evidence however, is still credible among we mouthbreathing blue collar types. Furthermore, I used to be responsible for huge binders full of MSDS sheets at my previous place of employment and I have yet to encounter one that addressed safe decapping of live primers. Maybe I was reading them wrong.
This is one that really needs to be made a sticky as there have been a lot of questions over the past few months about this and it really does not need to be hashed out everytime.
Interloper. I don't see how you felt AmmoSgt was stepping on your toes any. He simply made the statement that oils will not reliably kill primers, or render them inert. That has been posted by many here before.
Many have also posted it is safe to decap a live primer, when going slow and taking the correct precautions. And you can, in most cases, reuse the primer.
You're not going to find an MSDS sheet on decapping live primers anywhere. But he wasn't referring to a MSDS sheet on decapping live primers. I'll have to go back and read again, but I believe it discussed making inert and disposal of live primers. And that's the best information you're gonna find. That, and the advice and experience from others here.
We all should accept "safe" as a relative term in the practice of handloading.
And remember, some don't even know what a MSDS sheet is.
 

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That was a needlessly condescending answer. It might not be scientifically proven that oil deactivates primers. I doubt anyone has written their doctoral thesis on the matter. Empirical evidence however, is still credible among we mouthbreathing blue collar types. Furthermore, I used to be responsible for huge binders full of MSDS sheets at my previous place of employment and I have yet to encounter one that addressed safe decapping of live primers. Maybe I was reading them wrong.
Interloper... I certainly will have no problem tendering an apology to you, addressing you concerns over the tone of my post. If you will apologize for confusing the fact that oil can render a primer at most, unreliable, which is certainly backed by many ancedotal reports, with the totally different issue of rendering a primer inert, thus resulting in giving newbys incredibly unsafe guidance.

Apparently you got offended somehow by my posting the correct info... for your own sake I hope you don't let your blue collar pride interfer with your acceptance of the correct information and your understanding of the difference between unreliable and inert.

My personal apology to you awaits your apology for posting unsafe and incorrect info.

You also seem to confuse the difference between Empirical evidence http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Empirical_research with ancedotal evidence http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anecdotal_evidence.

Since you bring up resposibilities at past places of employment, I should mention I was , at a past place of employment, responsible for hundreds of lives directly involved with the maintenance, repair, storage, destruction, and dispostion of ammunition and bulk explosives .. over 15 years in the field actualy hands on and another 5 years as an instructor at the US Army Munitions School as well as another 10 years in essentially the same capacity as a civilian. I have seen GI's that blew themselves up mishandling munitions and ignoring safe practices... usually unauthorized collecting of "war trophies", or mishandling explosives because they "heard" you could do things a certain way from some buddy of theirs.
 

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I have removed live primers many times. A steady slow movement does it. The primer can even be reused.
Oil may or may not "kill" primers. It seems that it has to soak in for a while to have an effect.
If you are at all worried use the cloth trick. I have only poped one primer. I was using a Lee Loader
where you pound the primer in with a hammer, they are loud.
Good luck!
 

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I have removed live primers many times. A steady slow movement does it. The primer can even be reused.
Oil may or may not "kill" primers. It seems that it has to soak in for a while to have an effect.
If you are at all worried use the cloth trick. I have only poped one primer. I was using a Lee Loader
where you pound the primer in with a hammer, they are loud.
Good luck!
How hard did you hit with the hammer to seat that primer? It doesn't take that much force to seat a primer. I use my Lee handpress for seating every primer, for every caliber from handgun to rifle, and I am sure it doesn't generate as much force as hitting it with a hammer. No way.
 

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You will be surprised at how little force is needed to push out a primer that has been handloaded. Removal of primers from crimped military rounds is another issue. They take a lot more force and even with careful, slow pressure you may have one go off. In decapping over 200 rounds of crimped brass, I had two go off. The noise was minimal and there was no damage to anything (maybe it singed the inside of the decapping die). Of course, wearing eye protection and gloves is a must.
 

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A squirt of Oil or WD40 into a case is just as much or MORE of a hazard to the next powder charge you want to put into that case as it "might" be to your primer.

You would have to make a surefire effort to clean those cases inside!

A wad of oil contaminated powder may get you that next misfire or squib inspite of a shiny brand new primer.
 

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If there had actually been an apology hiding in that wall of text I would happily reciprocate.;)
It's not necessary for you to clarify with five more condescending paragraphs, my feeling are not hurt. In fact, I got a little chuckle out of it. I will amend my mental notebook: oil will not deactivate live primers.
I now return you to your regularly scheduled programming.:thumbsup:

edit:
And though I have been thoroughly chastised for illiteracy and superstition, I would like to provide a little link for your reading pleasure. Oddly, this seems to resemble the definition of empirical evidence cited above.
http://www.theboxotruth.com/docs/bot39.htm
 

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First, for those who don't already know, I am a cheap SOB. I work, or should I say, I spend my weekends at our local rifle range. During the course of my hours as a Range Warden, invariably shooters will have fail to feed ammo where the case gets contorted a bit. I accumulate that ammo and bring it home for deactivation. I will pull the bullets, collect the powder and pop out the primer for reuse in one of my brass cases. All components go back into making a new round of ammo with the exception of the contorted brass case that gets recycled along with the Berdan primed brass from my day's shooting. I have never had a problem with removing the primers and I have never had a problem with the ammo that I have loaded from "scavenged" components. I ALWAYS wear safety glasses when shooting or reloading and anything that even remotely looks questionable is immediately discarded. I do not attempt to reuse primers that have been crimped in for military brass. Bottom line is be safe...
 

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I wasn't refering to the Lee press. With the Lee Loader you do everything with a hammer.
Good luck!
That was understood. The reason I was asking how hard did you hit with the hammer to seat the primer was because a while back I read a post from someone concerned about the priming chamber for his Lee Loader as it had a little raised spot in the middle of the chamber, right where you set the primer, and it would cause a little dimple in the primer cup when seating. He was worried it could ignite the primer when seating. If yours has that same machining flaw, whacking it really hard with that hammer, to seat the primer, may have been the cause of the ignition. You don't need a lot of force to seat a primer.
 
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