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Oh no? Prove to me it's not then.
Well, that was easy now wasn't it?
Securely Storing Firearms in the UK - Countryway Gunshop
1. GUN CABINETS

This is likely to be the most probable method of storage for most people, with specially designed gun cabinets widely available for purchase across most stores. There are standard requirements for gun cabinets in the UK and storage units are strongly urged to meet these.

If you鈥檙e purchasing a cabinet from a vendor, make sure you ask them to see a test certificate to guarantee the unit is up to scratch. While it is not illegal to use a cabinet which doesn鈥檛 meet this standard, it makes your chances of keeping your firearm legally safe considerably higher.

It is advised that cabinets:

  • Should be made from sheet steel that is at least 14 swg (standard wire gauge) or 2mm thick
  • Have continuously welded seams or have been formed by bend construction to ensure there are no cracks or weak points
  • Use hinges which are located on the inside of the cabinet. If the hinges are situated on the outside then bolts, blocks or anti-lever bars should be utilised
  • Should use a lock mechanism which is also located on the inside of the cabinet and contain at least 5 levers
  • Contain a separate lockable storage unit to keep ammunition safe
  • Full-length side hinged cabinets should also have two locks 鈥 with these located one third and two thirds of the way up the unit

While these requirements are perhaps not as stringent as some of the other laws we鈥檝e encountered, it is still important to keep your gun cabinets as up to spec as possible. Keeping your weapons safe means you eliminate a potential threat before it can even begin to take shape.

Gun cabinets are without question the safest way to store you weapons and are as such highly advised to be used.
2. GUN CLAMPS

Gun cabinets are certainly not the only alternative, however. Gun clamps are another popular method of storage 鈥 with these units being considerably smaller for those worried about a cabinet taking up a large amount of space in their home.

Similarly to the cabinet, these clamps must be made out of steel which is 14 swg or 2mm thick, have seam-welded joints or be forged via the use of bend construction and have a lock which meets the requirements of the BS 3621 standard issue.

At worst, a very good quality padlock can be fitted to negate that step 鈥 but it is actively encouraged the required standard is met in order to ensure there鈥檚 as much safety as possible in the storage process.
3. STEEL CABLES

While it is advised you use one of the previous two methods to store your guns, the use of a regular steel cable is at times also an option. In this instance, a reinforced or industrial strength padlock will probably be enough to secure your weapon.

The complicated part of this storage device comes in the form of the installation process. In order to install the steel cable in a manner which ensures heightened safety, it is encouraged you:

  • 鈥 Place the cable in a room which does not have direct access to the outside (making it harder for someone to stroll into and pick the gun up willy-nilly) 鈥 Prevent the cable from being installed in a shed or an outside building 鈥 Make sure you take into account the load bearing strength of your floors if the device is of a heavier variety 鈥 Try to attach the cables in such a way that they鈥檙e connected to either concrete blocks, a brick wall or the floor 鈥 Keep the container out of view when someone walks into a room. Keeping a firearm in the corner can help prevent it from being noticed by intruders 鈥 Avoid fixing the container near a heat source

Barrel blocks and trigger guards are also considered by some to be effective storage devices, but it is generally advised to avoid them in favour of the units listed above.

Failure to properly secure your weapons could result in a thief or, even worse than that, a loved one, getting access to them and causing damage to themselves or others. Should that occur, the blame falls on the owner of the air weapon as they are legally the person who is responsible for the gun itself.
 

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My old veteran neighbor in NH before I retired had his "solution" to his potentially stolen firearms. He had a sign on his den gun cabinet that said, "Do not remove the Special Ammo." I asked him what was Special?" He said he was robbed twice in the past. He had a box or two of .30-06 ammo loaded with 50 grains of BULLEYE. He figured the next robber may want to try out his newly stolen Garand. He advised, "If that guy is on planet Earth when he shoots, we will hear it!" He had other "Special" handgun loads on hand.

Webley
 

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If you look more closely you'll see they can not be pried, slid, bent or lifted out, with that chain in that position. That's why I chose to put it there! You would have to cut the hardened eyes, padlock hasps or chain or chainsaw the bottom section..
Only a simpleton would use a plastic chain.
Its hardened steel the plastic coating is just to protect the finish.
It doesn鈥檛 do a lot of good to choose a steel lock and chains then attach it to thin wood. One good kick and that is broken in half and the guns can be removed
 

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It doesn鈥檛 do a lot of good to choose a steel lock and chains then attach it to thin wood. One good kick and that is broken in half and the guns can be removed
Err, Umm
Marine 5 ply
Washers & fender washers.
Go ahead, I invite you to do so!
When would you like to come?
 

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In this day and age of a huge range of monitored electronic surveillance it shouldn't be a problem to dissuade any thieves, or to catch them in the act if they're stupid enough to ignore the "You're under Monitored Video Surveillance" signs. I have enough monitored electronics watching my property to make the NSA jealous.
 

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My old veteran neighbor in NH before I retired had his "solution" to his potentially stolen firearms. He had a sign on his den gun cabinet that said, "Do not remove the Special Ammo." I asked him what was Special?" He said he was robbed twice in the past. He had a box or two of .30-06 ammo loaded with 50 grains of BULLEYE. He figured the next robber may want to try out his newly stolen Garand. He advised, "If that guy is on planet Earth when he shoots, we will hear it!" He had other "Special" handgun loads on hand.

Webley
And the thief sells it to another person - not involved in the crime - and an innocent person is dead.
 

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I was just wondering why that last paragraph specifically said air weapon instead of say...firearm?
To differentiate a low MV "air rifle or air pistol" from high MV air weapon,
UK* LEGAL LIMIT for an AIR RIFLE : - MUST BE UNDER 12 FOOT POUNDS of energy with all pellets that it can fire
UK* LEGAL LIMIT for an AIR PISTOL : - MUST BE UNDER 6 FOOT POUNDS OF ENERGY with ANY pellets it can fire.
because by (legal) definition a "Firearm" must be propelled by combustion, not compression, in the U.K.
 

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And if a citizen in the UK chooses to ignore all of what you posted, and simply store his guns against a wall in his closet, is that allowed ?
Of course not, don't be ridiculous!

That would make him a criminal. Being a criminal he's automatically lost his FAC (gun permit) & all his firearms MUST be surrendered, remember the Firearms Sergeant is standing IN the room to ensure there are no "Tragic Boating Accidents"!

Plus.
He wouldn't dare!

One of the things you agree to when applying for an FAC is "At Will" inspections of you premises & storage.
I'd get a couple of visits a year, The relationship between gun owners & LEO's is (or was) different there. I'd usually get a phone call about 20 minutes ahead "To Verify I'd be present for the inspection (Nudge, nudge: Wink, wink.) & could "put the kettle on".

My pistol & my rifle were stored in a gigantic oak wardrobe that had to be dismantled to get it into the room in the bottom were several ammunition cans for storing the pistols, (minus an essential part of the mechanism, usually the bolt or slide) which were stored in separate locked ammo cans. Any ammunition was in yet another ammo can similarly attached. The cans were padlocked, each one with a separate key or combination & bolted to the base of the wardrobe with carriage bolts with just the domed end outside. Inside there were washers, fender washers, & the nut. All were epoxied to the threaded part of the bolt.
He'd actually try to open the lids & lift the cans, before passing it again till next time.

It use to be 拢1,000 fine & 1 year in jail for each offense, I don't know what it is currently.
Each firearm was an offense as was each round of ammunition was a separate offense.
 
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