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hi all. just got myself a nickeled 1917 smith and wesson revolver. according to the data base i checked it was made august 1918. my question is .. why does'nt it have US property marks on bottom of the barrel or butt ? it has the numbered eagle stamps on all parts they should be. there is no flaming bomb or circle on upper left side of frame though.these inspector marks sure look a lot like the ones the germans later used by the way.i dont think any marking were removed when it was polished and nickled, the dates etc. on top of barrel are very clear, as are inspector stamps. the gun is just a shooter i know, but what a sweet shooter it is ! i am just wondering about it's history. was it sold off before milatary acceptance, given to postal service etc. thanks.
 

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I had a Colt new service in .455. It had british marks but not US. What calibre is yours?
 

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Discussion Starter #3
1917

it is a .45 acp us 1917 in all ways except for th us property marks.and like i said someone a long time ago had it nickeled.
 

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If it has the eagle head and S Stamps I believe that would be consistant with a late production (post April 1918) revolver, the lack of an ordnance acceptance mark could indicate a few possibilities - the revolver was completed and inspected but never accepted and reverted to Smith & Wesson when they regained control of the plant from the Army in 1919, or maybe a worker took it home in his lunchbox. Perhaps the stamping was so light the refinishing covered it. The SCSW indicates there were some commercial 1917 in nickel produced, with a small S&W trademark stamped on the left side of the frame. Why not get it lettered? That will tell you exactly when it left the factory and where it was shipped to, and it only cost $30.00
 

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The barrel could be a commercial replacement as well, that would explain the USP being missing but the most likely reason is the owner was worried about the marking so removed it with a buffer before the plating took place.
 

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It could just be a conversion from .455 or .45 LC to acp and just been so refinished as to hide everything! A lot of rechambering was done after WW2.
 

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If the gun is marked with US acceptance stamps and/or says US Army Model 1917 on the butt it was never a .455. All model 1917s were in .45ACP. The .455 guns were never a model 1917 and never had US acceptance markings.
 

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Werent some contract 1917's purchased for the UK Govt?
edited: My mistake it was a calibre conversion of the earlier .44 revolver apparently. I knew they were (S&W) available in .455 as I was offered one when I chose the Colt New Service to go with my Webley Mk6
 

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Above is the butt of one of the S&W M1917 in my collection. Note the serial number...perhaps first or second day of production. One of these days I am going to photograph this and get some pics up here.
 

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Werent some contract 1917's purchased for the UK Govt?
edited: My mistake it was a calibre conversion of the earlier .44 revolver apparently. I knew they were (S&W) available in .455 as I was offered one when I chose the Colt New Service to go with my Webley Mk6
The UK Government purchased some of the S&W Hand Ejectors in .455 Webley caliber. There was a smaller purchase of the so-called Triple Locks in the same caliber earlier but a subsequent substantial purchase of Second Model Hand Ejectors. These were purchased by the Canadian Army/Navy as well. In the USA they are most often found with Canadian markings and a large number have had their cylinders bored out to make them .45 Long Colt.
 
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