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Probably in the Baltic States, 1940-45 period. The Baltic States ( Estonia in particular) received large quantities of .303 calibre equipment in 1919-1920 from England, and .303 was one of their Issue calibres till the annexation by Soviets in 1940. Then their rifles etc wewre issued to "people's Militia in the 1941 german Invasion ( Defence of Moscow and Leningrad...One rifle, one clip of ammo.) Ross rifdles are rarely seen, more often P14 rifles and Occasionally Long Lee Enfields.
( Movie news reels).

Regards,
Doc AV
AV Ballistics.
 

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Soviet Post war Olympic and World Shooting match rifles included a "Ross"-derived Running Deer/Running Boar Target rifle. A couple were "souvenired" during the Melbourne Olympics ( 1956) by Aussie Shooters...they still pop up occasionally in discussions here in Australia. Of Course, they had a Tula Model designation, but Absolutely No reference to the Ross Rifle Co. origin. Calibre was 6,5x54R ( or 6,35x54R).

These led to the Aussies trying their own "Straight Pull" Target rifle, based on a "manualised" M1 Garand, and with custom shell cases and cartridges made by Footscray ( a "Rimless" .303 case, loaded with a 125 grain projectile). It was fielded in the 1958 World Shooting competition, but then disappeared from the scene. The Russians took a keen interest in the design, at the 58 Shoot, but nothing more....

Regards,
Doc AV
A V ballistics.
 
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