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Discussion Starter #1
I have a question about relative collector value. Which would you consider the most valuable as a collector piece:

a) WWII Russian TT-33, typical worn finish, mismatched parts (even slide not matching frame), no import mark and no added safety.

b) 1951 Russian TT-33, finish better than a) but typical for the time period, all matching parts, import added safety has been removed and hole plugged (not a bad job but could look nicer, safety arc still there), import mark also apparently removed.

c) 1938 Russian TT-33, all matching parts, no import mark or added safety, satin nickel finish over a somewhat pitted surface. Supposedly a vet bringback nickeled after in the U.S.

I own b) and c) and wonder where a) would fit in my meager collection.

Thanks,
John F.
 

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I'm not sure what the question is-how much would it be worth or would you/should you buy it?
 

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Interesting question. Probably different answers from different folks. To me, (a) would be the most collectible.

SlimTim
 

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a)

Not messed with by importers or private owners. Just mixmastered during service.

Just my opinion
 

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IMHO in order of collector value I would rank them "a", then "c", then "b". The first one, as farmall suggests, is "Not messed with by importers or private owners. Just mixmastered during service." The third one is also nice because it lacks the import mark and added safety and, as unfortunate as it is, it was not uncommon to have these "trophy" pistols nickeled or chromed. In essence, this refinishing by the soldier/owner becomes part of the pistols history. The middle one, again IMHO, is just something "butchered" by the addition of the import marks (if billboard-style) and especially the safety. Personally, I would choose not to own a TT-33 before I ever picked up one with the added safety.

Just my .02 cents.

Tim
 

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IMHO in order of collector value I would rank them "a", then "c", then "b". The first one, as farmall suggests, is "Not messed with by importers or private owners. Just mixmastered during service." The third one is also nice because it lacks the import mark and added safety and, as unfortunate as it is, it was not uncommon to have these "trophy" pistols nickeled or chromed. In essence, this refinishing by the soldier/owner becomes part of the pistols history. The middle one, again IMHO, is just something "butchered" by the addition of the import marks (if billboard-style) and especially the safety. Personally, I would choose not to own a TT-33 before I ever picked up one with the added safety.

Just my .02 cents.

Tim
I would agree with your ranking. While my own preference is for Toks without added safety,
I would prefer one with safety to no Tokarev of that particular type.
 

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I would quickly trade b and/or c for a.
 

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Most definitely (a)
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thank you all for the enlightenment! It appears that I have been placing too much importance on "all matching". I really thought that c), with the earlier date, all matching and probable vet provenance would outrank both b) and a). A "newbie" misconception, I suppose, but I still favor c). It's great fun to hold and shoot, all the while imagining the kind of action it may have seen before me.

Thanks,
John F.
 

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Kobayashi Maru

For an "off" opinion, my answer is "D", none of the above. Too many folks buy multiple poor examples instead of saving their money for one, all correct decent one. Find a wartime dated, original finish, matched (mag m/m OK) bringback and ditch multiple other examples of lesser qualiy. If you approach your collection this way, it will always increase in value and is far more historically interesting. Quality over quantity every time (of course, a LOT of really nice pieces is the long-term goal!). Plus, in this case it probably would have cost less overall? The patience part gets a lot of folks. The exception is something so rare you might not ever get another chance... then buy it and hope for an upgrade opportunity. I have lots of gun types on their 2nd or third upgrade (also tied to more money than when I started collecting).
 

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I agree with Brad I'm afraid. Always go for the best example after upgrade. My personal philosophy is get and example then if you can later one upgrade the type to the best possible shape you can.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks BradB and Vic! I do see the point and am starting to believe that is a better strategy to follow. And, indeed, the nail was hit directly on the head with a solid blow when patience was mentioned. I am forced to ask myself why my Russian SKS numbers recently reached 24 and TT-33's numbered 8, not counting Chinese examples. Still, I must say, and I don't mean this to seem argumentative, I love that 1938 vet bring back and will probably never part with it. After all, it is already the best example imaginable of a formerly pitted, now nickeled "went through the war" bringback type.

John F.
 
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