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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
As I mentioned in another thread I have a number of Russian manuals (and other documents) concerning the Dragunov. Here are the first two with more to come.

This is the standard soldier's manual for the SVD, in this case a 1984 printing:

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The following is the much more extensive armorer's repair and maintenance manual:

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I have both the SVD handbook and the armourers manual and was fortunate to find a Soviet service/repair manual for the PSO-1 scope as well, which I believe are quite rare
That’s one I need. Please post some photos.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Continuing the subject of Dragunov optics here are a few pages from a Russian manual on night vision scopes, some of which were used with the SVD:

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Thanks very much! Definitely a manual I don’t have and need.
There is one on EBay at the moment, but it isn’t cheap.......mine was also off EBay but was considerably cheaper

 

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Never saw the use of the manual since i don't read or speak Russian. Mind Dragunov came with the manuals and the Romanian PSL did too.
For me it isn’t about the use of having the manuals, for me it snowballed after buying a Soviet SVD mag pouch.......then realising I needed another two mags because the pouch holds four......then I needed the correct cleaning rods and cleaning kit to go in the pouch.....then a winter battery holder for the PSO-1......then the small pouch that holds the winter battery holder and the oil bottle........and so on!.

I don’t “need” or “use” Soviet night vision optics but couldn’t resist buying a 1pn34 and then a 1pn58.......and then a 1p21 scope came up for sale so I had to have that as well.The SVD and its accessories can become a bit of an obsession!.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I have various accessories, optics, and pieces of web gear for the Dragunov that were captured from Iraqi soldiers and brought back from Desert Storm in 1991. Sooner or later I'm going to post photos of all those bits and pieces, but until then, and sticking with the documentary theme of this thread, here are a few pages from a "SERVICE LOG" for the 7.62-mm Dragunov sniper rifle:

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Note that when the Soviets provided material and assistance to its allies (and potential allies) around the world they often provided related manuals and instructions in the far more widely understood English language instead of their native Russian.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
It doesn't happen very often but sometimes I can pin point the exact moment in time when learned about something. One of those times relates to the Log Book I posted above.

Before the very brief Desert Storm campaign was even completed in February of 1991 I had already put out the word that I was interested in purchasing any of the souvenirs that our guys captured and brought home. Back in those pre-internet dark ages there was little or no way to learn about what was used by the Iraqi forces until I began purchasing the bits and pieces that the vets hauled back to the States. It was a hands-on learning experience. Back then almost everything was a direct purchase from the vets or from the "pickers" who I know got what they sold me from vets. It didn't take long before I had a very good idea of what the Iraqi soldiers wore, carried, and used. One of the rare pieces that I learned about before actually acquiring one was the Dragunov Log Book.

In November of 1992 a letter (by a Canadian soldier) to the editors of the NRA's American Rifleman magazine caught my eye. In that letter the author described finding a Log Book in April of '91 while serving with the Allied Coalition and instantly, upon learning of their existence, I simply had to have one. I cut out and saved that letter from the magazine knowing that someday I would get lucky.



It took several years but in the mid '90s I purchased a huge lot of Desert Storm bringbacks from a local vet, an army Captain, who had to order his men to crush and burn piles of Iraqi small arms including Dragunovs in their packing crates. Since the Captain didn't want to risk his career (and his freedom) he didn't consider for even a moment trying to sneak an SVD home but he did grab a few things out of the crates that wouldn't get him in trouble such as the books, cheek pieces, slings, battery "warmers" and web magazine pouches. And that's how I got my little Dragunov books! 😊
 
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I’m a little surprised the Iraqi’s had the winter battery warmer/holder, as they were intended to be worn clipped to the inside of an Afghanka style winter jacket to help keep the battery warm and stop the intense cold of a Russian/Eastern European winter sapping the power from the little 2.5v battery that the PSO-1 originally used, although i guess they were just included in the crates of Dragunov’s that the Soviets shipped to Iraq........that said I’m not that clued up on how cold Iraqi winters get so maybe they were of use to them.
 
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