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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a question on my Great Grandfathers Ross Mk. II rifle.

This rifle seems to have been in the New York National Guard at some point, and then my GGF got a hold of it.

The rear sight is not the same as any others I have seen. There seems to have been an original sight and it was removed and replaced with a new sight. You can see the small cut out where the elevation knob would fit in the hand guard when the sight was laid down.

I thought it was just some aftermarket thing my Great Grandfather added as he sportarized the rife stock and added a Layman sight to the receiver bridge. But the thing is, is that he added a layman sight on the receiver bridge, so a new rear sight would be kind of redundant. That and the sight has a Canadian proof mark on it. A crown over a number (6 if I remember correctly).

So where did the sight come from? It is shorter than the original and the elevation knob is on the opposite side of the sight, which required a new divot to be taken out of the hand guard for the elevation knob.

I'll see about getting some pics up later.
 

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The two sights normally found are the Canada Tool and Spec. sight as well as the Sunderland sight. Normally the Sunderland has the larger knob cut out on the right side of the handguard... Pictures sure would make it easier...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
OK, here are three really bad pictures that I had in my folder already. I'll get some good ones later.





 

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Sutherland sight

as covered by three patents in 1904, 1905 and 1907. Quite an elegant design as the vertical travel screw can be unlocked so the slide can be easily moved near where it is wanted, then the lockscrew is done up again and fine adjustments made.

The windage scale gives up to 25 minutes of adjustment. You have to zero the rifle to your hold/ammo and remember the zero setting on the windarm scale

The elevation scale on the edge also gives minutes and reads as a vernier. The elevation scale has no zero since it starts at 40 minutes and would go up to about 280 minutes (way more than you are likely to need!)
 
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