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Well, JK, the silence was deafening. The answer is that the survival of RB slings was very poor. So little is really known about them here (or there) they might not even be recognized when they're seen. It is quite a contrast to the survival of other later slings for the Mauser family. The standard issue sling remains in abundance. Even the scarce ones can be had given both opportunity and money.

I, also, have one navy sling in my collection similar to yours although mine is in smooth rather than pebbled leather. The markings on the brass button (knapp) is also the same.







In conversation with one Swedish dealer, he remembers acquiring a large batch of m/67-69 rifles with navy markings which included the slings. It is quite possible this was the origin of these slings. He remembers during a period of time he had hundreds of rolling blocks but only very few with military slings. He suggested (and quite plausible) that when the rifles went into storage the slings were stripped from them and stored elsewhere to be ultimately scrapped.

It does appear that these Navy slings are unique to the sea service. I've spent a couple of hours going through the on-line holdings of the Armeemuseum and I have yet to find a single short sling of this design. The army sling appears to be two piece in construction with applied leather tabs over the brass buttons. The sling appears to capable of only being adjustable in two lengths. The most typical of the Army rolling block slings are shown below:





The Armeemuseum catalog suggests that there were a few late transition slings associated with the early m/96 rifle production such as these:





While many of the later Mauser style slings in the Armeemuseum collection are only identified as slings for the m/96 rifle, I did find two that were listed as the pattern model for adoption. These are correctly identified as m/1899 slings for the year of design adoption.





In seeing the images of the characteristic leather tab on these early early slings, I went back through my collection and found one early sling which had been converted to the standard m/1899 design.






Seeing this what I would guess to be an early conversion also leads me to understand what the fate of other RB slings might have been.

Needless to say, there is a lot of unknowns when it comes Swedish Army rifle slings prior to the m/1899 adoption. It will be interesting to see what can be learned in the years ahead.

Good collecting, as always
 

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nordic shooters
how about swedish jarmann slings ,
most of them have no sling swivel on the upper barrelband
I saw ones a picture of such a sling ,with a hook fitting on the barrelband bolt ,just like on the russian berdan II rifles same system
some one cn help me
greetins from over the pond
jarmann
 

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My Swedish friends have indicated that such reproductions exist but are not commonly found. They have not had the opportunity to examine them for accuracy and/or quality. I'm not sure if the are of the Army or Navy pattern. One of my friends was going to check on these slings at the recent military show in Solna. If I hear something I'll be happy to pass it along.
 
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