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Never seen that pistol before. How exactly is it related to the Makarov PM? I see several similarities such as as slight resemblance near the muzzle end of the slide and hammer but otherwise it bears little semblance.
 

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I am keen to get hold of the IZH-75 (commercial export version of the PSM) but they are not currently available ex the Baikal factory in Russia.But when (if?) they start making them again I will get one definitely.
 

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Interesting. I do remember reading someplace about the Mak getting the PPK treatment as part of the design competition that lead to the Soviets adopting the PSM. They say the PSM was never very well-liked by those who were issued it for concealed-carry. They probably would've been better off with a reduced in size PM.
 

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Hello. Thank you for sharing. So, let me get this straight. This pistol, the Klimovsk BV-025, is a design competition test piece? That would make it a fairly rare item. Do you have any idea how many were made? Whether you know the answer or not you have certainly given me some new information. This is a fascinating post! Regards, ABTOMAT
 

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KGB in 1969 ordered slim pistol. There was a compeptition between Tula (PSM, later ИЖ-75) and Klimovsk (БВ-025), Klimovsk was lost :( and this pistol became aunique prototype. It was reworked for blank, and gived to designer Бабкин http://www.megasword.ru/index.php?pg=148
That looks like a cool piece. I would love to own one, really sweet.
 

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:thumbsup:
Hello. Thank you for sharing. So, let me get this straight. This pistol, the Klimovsk BV-025, is a design competition test piece? That would make it a fairly rare item. Do you have any idea how many were made? Whether you know the answer or not you have certainly given me some new information. This is a fascinating post! Regards, ABTOMAT
 

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For those interested, here is what I found with Klimovsk mentioned as well as the 5.45x18 caliber.
Ok, now some info on the gun, from my upcoming book "Modern combat pistols" (expected late 2006)

The year of 1972 saw adoption of a somewhat unusual weapon “complex” that included an entirely new cartridge and a pistol to fire it. Unlike the designs described above, both pistol and its ammunition were quite standard in nature; cartridge was rather unimpressive by its numbers, having 5.45mm bullet with moderate velocity of about 300 m/s, and the pistol was more of a deep-concealment, last ditch weapon than anything else. The PSM pistol, in fact, was designed on a request from almighty KGB, which required a concealed carry weapon for their plainclothes operatives, which operated “in country”. Original papers, approved by Government, requested for a “flat-sized pistol, not thicker than a standard matchbox (17mm)”. There were no specifications for caliber, and it is not known why TSNII TochMash dared to develop entirely new round when other rounds were already available, and actually manufactured in USSR before, such as 6.35x16SR Browning and 7.65x17SR Browning. The only real (although of doubtful value) advantage of the new 5.45x18 MPTs (official index 7N7) round is its deeper penetration, especially against soft body armor at short ranges. The stopping power of this round is so miserable that many operatives officially refused to carry this pistol in the harms’ way, asking for the venerable PM instead. The PSM itself was quite conventional weapon, but of very thin and flat profile. It was tested against only one other competitor, the BV-025, which was more or less a scaled down Makarov PM copy, chambered for the same 5.45x18 ammunition. Government officially approved the PSM for service in 1972, and since the mid-seventies it has been issued mostly to top-ranking officials of military, law enforcement and Communist party, as a self-defense (or suicide-special, as it turned out during turbulent first half of the nineties) weapons
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The PSM pistol (Pistolet Samozarjadnyj Malogabaritnyj – selfloading small pistol) is one of the thinnest self-defense guns ever made, as it is only 17mm (2/3 of an inch) thick; but it is also one of the most useless defensive weapons, as the pointed, jacketed bullet of small caliber and moderate velocity (about 300 m/s) can take about forever to disable a target, even in the case of middle-of-the chest hit. Of cause, it is better than bare knuckles, but way too many cases were recorded when people had fatal shots with 5.45x18 bullets (usually in the chest area) but continued to fight or run for as much as half of an hour, and then suddenly collapsed and died from internal bleeding. During the early 1990s this pistol also became a favorite among criminal hitmen, who preferred it for ease of concealment and good penetration against soft body armor. Many of such guns (usually stolen from army warehouses) were later confiscated by Russian police, often fitted with homemade silencers. Export versions of PSM, known as IZh-75, were also made in 6.35mm Browning / .25ACP, which, probably was a little more effective as a manstopper than the original 5.45mm load. PSM pistols are manufactured by the Izhevsk Mechanical Plant.
PSM is blowback-operated weapon with stationary barrel. It is of all-steel design, with either aluminium (early) or plastic (modern) grip panels. Trigger is of double action type, with exposed hammer and slide-mounted safety/ decocker. The safety arrangement is a little unusual in that the lever is made flat with the slide, and protrudes rearwards, along with the hammer. This way the safety does not increase the overall width of the gun, and also allows turning safety off and cocking the hammer in one movement of the thumb. Pistol is fitted with slide stop device, but it has no manual release – to close slide that was locked open after the last shot from magazine, one must pull it rearwards and then release. Magazines are single stack, with small finger rest, magazine release located at the heel of the grip. Sights are of fixed type.
 

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mokus, I am impressed by your access to some very scarce items! So, while you are posting here I have to see if you can answer this question. I collect Soviet era PMs. I believe I know the proof mark used on them, but have found no official confirmation. This appears to be a Cyrillic PC inside a circle stamped under the barrel on early Makarovs, and behind the date on the left rear of the frame on later Soviet PMs. Can you comment on this? Thank you, ABTOMAT
 

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Hi TENNESSEEN! Nope, it is a Cyrillic "PS" in a circle. I'm not computer competent enough to post the Russian letters. Can anyone out there in Makarov Land do it? The marks you show are commercial. The left one, I believe, indicates Russian made to industry standards. The right one is the Izmech mark I think. I am no expert, but due to the lack of hard info on Soviet and post Soviet marks, at least as far as I know, we are left with educated guesses. Hence my crude attempt to hijack this thread in an obsessive collector's attempt to confirm one such educated guess. Its wrong I know. I feel so cheap and dirty. Regards, with tongue firmly in cheek, ABTOMAT
 

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Thanks TENNESSEEAN, but the pistol in only displaying some sort of inspection mark. The Cyrillic "PS" I'm referring to would be under the slide, on the left side of the frame lug that retains the barrel. Later ones had it placed after the date on the outside of the frame. That is, if you hold the Makarov in your right hand you will see above your thumb a letter prefixed serial number, the Ishevsk Arsenal symbol, the date, the proof mark under discussion, and a final mark. I don't know when the change occurred, some time in the mid-1960's. Only the last two marks are stamped, often so lightly as to be only partly legible. The other markings were engraved on earlier guns, or matrix dot marked on later ones. Nice Early Makarov. I think 1960 they used both letter and regular dates. Sorry mokus, I return control of this thread to you. ABTOMAT
 
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