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What's next? Pearl Harbor, Rape of Nanking, Rape of Manila didn't happen? :mad:

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100,000 protest over Japan textbook

By CHISAKI WATANABE, Associated Press Writer Sat Sep 29, 10:31 PM ET

TOKYO - More than 100,000 people protested Saturday in southern Japan against the central government's order to modify school textbooks which say the country's army forced civilians to commit mass suicide at the end of World War II.

Publishers of history textbooks were ordered in December to modify sections that said the Japanese army — faced with an impending U.S. invasion in 1945 — handed out grenades to residents in Okinawa and ordered them to kill themselves rather than surrender to the Americans.

The amendment order came amid moves by Tokyo to soften brutal accounts of Japanese wartime conduct, but triggered immediate condemnation from residents and academics.

About 110,000 residents and politicians attended Saturday's rallies in the prefecture (state) of Okinawa, said Yoshino Uetsu, one of the organizers.

"We cannot bury the fact that the Japanese military was involved in the mass suicide, taking into account of the general background and testimonies that hand grenades were delivered," Okinawa Gov. Hirokazu Nakaima told a crowd gathered at a park in Ginowan City.

Accounts of forced group suicides on Okinawa are backed by historical research, as well as testimonies from victims' relatives. Historians also say civilians were induced by government propaganda to believe U.S. soldiers would commit horrible atrocities and therefore killed themselves and their families to avoid capture.

About 500 people committed suicide, according to civic group and media reports.

In recent years, some academics have questioned whether the suicides were forced — part of a general push by Japanese conservatives to soften criticism of Tokyo's wartime conduct.

The bloody battle in Okinawa raged from late March through June 1945, leaving more than 200,000 civilians and soldiers dead, and speeding the collapse of Japan's defenses. The U.S. occupied Okinawa from the end of World War II until 1972.

New textbooks for use in Japanese schools must be screened and approved by a government-appointed panel, which can order corrections of perceived historical inaccuracies. The publishers of seven textbooks slated for use in high schools next year had been asked to make relevant changes and submit them for approval.

An official of the Education Ministry said Saturday that the ministry has no immediate plans concerning the amendment. She spoke on condition of anonymity, citing policy.

Saturday's rally was the largest in Okinawa since the island was returned to Japan by the United States in 1972, Kyodo News agency said. In 1995, 85,000 people took part in a rally following the 1995 rape of a schoolgirl there by three American servicemen, according to the agency.

Source: http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070930/ap_on_re_as/japan_textbook_protest
 

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Given that Japan (society generally, government specifically) has never accepted responsibility for actions during the war, including recognition of Japanese aggression toward China as well as frequent misbehavior by Japanese forces, this should be no surprise. All part of the usual Japanese attitude. Deny it happened, if it did, it was somebody else's fault, etc..
 

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Clark said:"Those who forget the past,etcetc"

I'd suggest: Even more, those who intentionally conceal the true past from themselves...
 

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Sorry to say it happens every day in the USA too.
 
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They never have taken responsibility for what they had done. The goverment never even officially apologized for the war. In some of ways the atrocities the Japanese committed were worse than the Nazi's In another 50 years they will have totally white washed their activities and "dishonorable actions" in the war.

Jim
 

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They (japanese) can pretend all they like.....it does not change history and those countries/people who suffered under them will not forget what they did.
 

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They (japanese) can pretend all they like.....it does not change history and those countries/people who suffered under them will not forget what they did.

How many people remember 12/07/1941 today ?
 

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What I meant was,just because the jap's try to revise history and change their history books,does not mean everyone else will follow suit.FWIW my father recalls the events of WW11 quite clearly,as he was a boy during those years,although he did not see anything first hand as he was 17 when the war ended.He dislikes the japanese to this day.Also the allies have to take some of the blame for this,as the japanese were never really called to account for their atrocities and,to some extent,I feel the victors (I mean the politicians and military leaders) were just as keen to forget about it as the defeated japanese.And that was not right.
 

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For starters, every time you hear someone whinging about "Hiroshima", just say, "Unit 731"; if they have any clue at all, that should shut them up.
 

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The Arabs are the same way. When I was posted in Egypt I went to their museum celebrating their victory over the Israelis in Oct '73. The museum covered the crossing of the canal and then for two days afterwards. Beyond that, they made you think that the Israelis sued for peace.
 

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I agree with caerlonie, the victors never held the Japs accountable. At least not on the scale of the Germans. History even holds civilians in Germany guilty of not "standing up" against Nazi atrocities, regardless of their knowledge of.

There was no Japanese Nurenberg. The Japanese never had to apologize, never felt obligated to pay reparations to those they hurt, and it seems now, don't even have to acknowledge they even did any wrong.
 

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Oh yeah, and I think it may have had to do a little bit with the fact that the Japanese are NOT white or Europeans. Since liberalism teaches us that only white people are capable of committing crimes against humanity.

I.E.: the Germans were held accountable, the Japanese were not.
 

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How much do you think MacArthur had to do with the fact that there wasn't a Japanese Nuremberg? It's been years since I read about it but I seem to recall his policies regarding Japan after the war were considered coddling by many at the time.

Just speculation on my part. There was widespread photographic coverage of the Nazi death camps which had to have helped feed the determination to prosecute the Nazi leaders at Nuremberg. While the Japanese atrocities did occur, they weren't documented on the same scale and, perhaps most importantly, couldn't get much traction at the time since the world was focused on the Nazi ones.

There are those who now deny the Nazi atrocities against the Jews ever happened. It would seem the Japanese text book history-changers are following in their footsteps and without inconvenient court transcripts, too.

Steve
 

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I think that the difference is that the Germans had an organized effort to be cruel starting at almost the top, while the Japanese did it on a lower level. Both had philosophical opinions about lesser people, but the Japanese didn't have an organized plan to kill off all lesser people. On a practical level, it was easy to punish those at the top of the German hierarchy, but they would have had to punish a huge number of lower-level Japanese for casual cruelty.

This is just an opinion, I defer to anyone who has facts to refute.
 

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There were extensive war crimes trials in Tokyo, Manila and some other places (e.g., Ambon, under Australian auspices, and Khabarovsk, conducted by the Russians over Unit 731 activity). Several thousand were prosecuted in the trials outside Japan and something like 4400 convicted, with death sentences in the hundreds. Tokyo trials involved hundreds of cases, including Tojo Hideki.

I'd say that while there may not have been a "Japanese Nuremberg" in the sense of a multinational panel and prosecution in essentially one place, the Japanese were subjected to war crimes trribunals. Problem is - unlike the Germans, the Japanese went on their merry way without acknowledging what was revealed at those tribunals - cultural difference I guess, one that sometimes makes me feel that Bill Halsey's alleged comment when he entered PH a few days after the attack ("When we get finished with this war, the Japanese language will only be spoken in Hell") should been made to come true.
 

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There were extensive war crimes trials in Tokyo, Manila and some other places (e.g., Ambon, under Australian auspices, and Khabarovsk, conducted by the Russians over Unit 731 activity). Several thousand were prosecuted in the trials outside Japan and something like 4400 convicted, with death sentences in the hundreds. Tokyo trials involved hundreds of cases, including Tojo Hideki.

Problem is - unlike the Germans, the Japanese went on their merry way without acknowledging what was revealed at those tribunals - cultural difference I guess

Clyde we should sit down together and write a book as this area has always fascinated me.

Yes, there were myriad trials, sentences, and executions that were carried out in the Pacific Theater that did not receive the (then or current) publicity that the Nazi trials did. BUT, as I've griped about before, we had hundreds of Nazi trials and passed out lots of life sentences that later we saw pardoned wholesale in the early 50's when the whole mess "died down." :mad: Still makes me sick and I don't care about the political rationale.

The Nazi atrocities remain a cultural touch point because (among other things) the Germans "look like us" and culturally are so very similar to us as a "western" society. We are culturally and historically, the defacto farthest western boundary of Europe.

Outside of the treatment of our captured soldiers, the Japanese outrageously evil treatment of Koreans, Filipino's, and Chinese was never as (God forgive me) "Sexy" from a news/film/journal/hollywood standpoint as the "Holocaust."

Also, don't forget that communist and other radical elements within Germany had a reason to keep rubbing their fellow citizens noses in the past. The Commies wanted to forever link any conservative German (even an independent Germany herself) with the past Nazi-genocidal Germans..........pure radical politics.
There was no similar element within Japan that gained an advantage by continually bringing up the Imperial period's "indiscretions."
 

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Stein, with all, or at least most, of what you have to say supra. Except me writing a book on the subject, even as a co-author. There hae been some books on both (European and Pacific) trials, but few have reached great audiences.

One of my law school profs was on the staff at Manila IIRC (not as a lawyer; he was an artillery LTC, 1939 grad of West Point, which says something about how quick promotions could be in war-time, especially for a regular), and the experience inspired him to become a lawyer. Got uncle to send him to Law School (Yale) and he then finished a 20 year career - with ONE promotion from 1945 until his retirement in 1959. Hulen Wendorf, from the city of West, TX (around 20 miles north of Waco, settled by and still full of Bohemians; they have some bakeries that make rally good kolaches). Taught various things including criminal law, juvenile law and evidence at Baylor. Interesting fellow, said that he thought Yamashita got a really raw deal at Manila. Not my favorite prof, though. I avoided his evidence course (spread over two quarters, normally - he knew the subject, but was a boring teacher) by taking it from a visiting prof as a one quarter, five days a week, course one summer quarter. Lewis Muldrow, who later retired from private practice and taught full time as the (at Baylor)somewhat prestigious slot as Practice Court professor, replacing Matt "Mad Dog" Dawson. Taking evidence from Lou Muldrow was like getting an enema with a fire-hose, but boring he wasn't.

I read the complete Yamashita transcript, including the appeals and various petitions for clemency, while I was at the JAG School in 1974. I found myself agreeing with Col. Wendorf - Yamashita got a raw deal.

Now - he might have deserved trial, condemnation and execution, but NOT for what he was in the dock for (officially) at Manila.

There are books in the war crimes trials, European and Pacific, all right. I just don't know if I am the guy to try and write one of them. Just gathering the research material and figuring out what to use would be daunting. And, even with net-based research to help, expensive.
 

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Sadly,the witnesses to the atrocities of WW2 are dying off every day.It is up to those of us who had the honor of knowing these men who saved the world to preseve the truth of what they saw.They were our fathers,uncles and grandfathers.Their memories must be preserved in spite of the actions of those who would re write history just so people can feel good.
 
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