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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all!

I have an arisaka type 99 rifle that my grandfather recovered during world war 2. I received it about 5 -6 years ago and now have decided i would like to restore it and possibly fire it??

Now, understandably its not in the greatest condition, but i was wondering where i should start in attempting to do this. My digicam is not with me at the moment, so i cant post pics at the moment.

the metal has a decent amount of brown spotting aside from the bolt which is half decent in all the spots where there is friction. everything seems to function fine but then again, i know nothing about rifles.

let me know if you can be of any assistance..

p.s. im in NJ if anyone is local and can be of assistance.


thanks
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 · (Edited)
after looking around a bit i found all the serial info and it is a series 1, toyo kogyo (1939-1945)... and the chrysanthemum has been filed off.




what kind of risk is the gun at as well as myself if i just clean, lube, and then attempt to fire it.. im not trying to destroy it.
alternatively, i wouldnt mind keeping its "authentic" look and feel as you can tell its obviously been used before... so the restoration basically only entails firability.

If i take it to a local gunshop will they be able to determine its firing capability??

and ammo must be farely scarce for this weapon..
 

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The series would have to from Nagoya if it was a series 1. No matter; just check the stickys above, to determine the manufacturer/series if you wish to know. Most important for firing (in my opinion) is if the bolt number (on the bolt handle) matches the last three digits of the serial number. If it does, know that Arisaka actions are exceptionally strong. No worries about finring it. A good cleaning; soap and water for the stock and light oil and 0000 steel wool for the metal, should give you a nice return for your efforts.

John in Charlotte, NC
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
i attached what the serial says... (i did it in paint just now)
the bolt matches 243


i was wrong about the series 1, i think i got that from reading another post and then confusing what i read with what i thought was on mine..

so its series 33 from what i can see.. still safe?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
sorry it took so long to get pics. i was at school and my gun was at home.
its obviously not in the best condition, which i sorta like..nice and authentic. im going to buy some bullets this week and hopefully get out to a range one of these days. :)








you can see in this last pic the current condition of the metal...
 

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If you do what has been said with the steel wool and oil you will be pleasently supprised at how well it will look. Take it out of the stock so you can clean all or if. You have a good momento. riceone
 

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Nice rifle, tigerstyle. Try to gather as much information as possible now while you can. I assume your grandfather has passed away (?). If so, try to get as much information as you can from relatives, and write it down. Someday your grandkids will appreciate the information, I guarantee.

The condition is great for a true unmessed-with bringback. If the screws are "staked" (meaning, if there are little divots around the edge of the screw head that appear to have never been disturbed) I'd leave it. You can still clean it up a bit using 0000 steel wool (or better yet, very fine bronze wool) and a few drops of gun oil at a time. Go slow and move the wool in small circles. It may take a few evenings watching the ball game and rubbing the coat of rust off, but in the end you'll clean the rust off without destroying the original finish.

Make sure the barrel and chamber are clean and clear of any obstructions before firing. I don't mean to state the obvious, but better safe than sorry. The bolt face and bore should be chromed, so you will likely find a very shiny bore once you've run a couple oiled patches through.
 

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I never did like to put on clean clothes over dirty underwear. Went to school with a boy who always combed the front part of his hair (that he could see) but never the back where he could not see. Somebody at some time is going to take those screw out and the longer they stay put the harder they will be to get out. Took the barrel jacket off a 1889 Belguim carbine the barrel what use to be bright was flaked with rust. Outside tube was nice. Each to his own. riceone :rolleyes:
 

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I never did like to put on clean clothes over dirty underwear. :rolleyes:
Funny analogy. Sounds like something the Rodent would do ;)
I guess we'll just have to disagree on this subject until you & Yoda see the light and realize that I'm right :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
He has passed on, so i do not believe i will be able to get too much information about the rifle and its story.

I see the divots around the screws so i will probably not be doing much to them at this juncture, especially since i do not know much about weaponry...yet. I will defintely be polishing up all the metal over the course of my break from school, and im aching to shoot it. im probably going to bring it to a gun shop and have them check it out and maybe show me exactly what i need to do to clean the barrel (as i said, im new to all of this).

thanks for all your help everybody, ill keep this thread updated with pics as i get the wheels in motion.
 

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Since you are new to firearms, I want to add a couple of things that might not be obvious to someone who has never dealt with old rifles before.

The bolt is removable, just open the action, move the bolt backwards, and tug on that little thingy on the left, its called a "bolt stop" and it will allow you to pull the bolt free of the action and clean it up separately. If you are feeling adventerous, you can disassemble it and make sure the insides are clean/lubed.

You can also use the little button inside the trigger guard to release the magazine floorplate (the metal cover on the bottom). The floorplate will drop free along with the magzine leaf spring and follower (the thing the bullets rest on). This will also give you a chance to see if the inside of the magazine and those parts are covered with grease.

How does the metal buttplate at the end of the stock look?

Enjoy this piece of history.
 

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I will just emphasize that if you use steel wool, be sure it is marked on the bag "0000" anything coarser( less "0"s) can hurt what remains of the rifles original finish. Anything finer (more "0"s) could take a millenium. Original finish is important to the value of these rifles. If you are unsure about some steel wool that you have lying about the house, I would just get a fresh pack at the hardware store, $3 tops. I know people really dig the bronze wool, but I haven't used it myself and can't vouch for it.
Ammunition for this rifle is usually advertised as 7.7 JAP. or japanese. It is not a commonly available cartridge, but is around. It is loaded by norma and hornady. Norma is pricey retailing about $30-35 for a box of 20 rounds. Sometimes gunshops have an old tattered box laying around for maybe $20 or so. Hornady is around $18-25 a box of 20.
 

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He has passed on, so i do not believe i will be able to get too much information about the rifle and its story.

I see the divots around the screws so i will probably not be doing much to them at this juncture, especially since i do not know much about weaponry...yet. I will defintely be polishing up all the metal over the course of my break from school, and im aching to shoot it. im probably going to bring it to a gun shop and have them check it out and maybe show me exactly what i need to do to clean the barrel (as i said, im new to all of this).

thanks for all your help everybody, ill keep this thread updated with pics as i get the wheels in motion.
Try not to polish it, just get the rust off using the methods described.

I know about not being able to get stories about your family bringbacks. My great grandfather died way before I couldve asked him anything about his mauser.
 

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You guys that recommend 0000 steal wool, just once, should try bronze wool. If you do, you won't be recommending steel wool. I would tell a new gun owner to only use oil and a rag on the metal and boiled linseed oil, or nothing on the wood. When rust stop coming off on the rag, then think about wools. This; untill the new gun owner buys a 30cal. rifle cleaning kit,reads a book on gun care or talk to one or two gun collectors. One last thing. Stay away from gun smiths untill you know what they are talking about. You will know why I say this, after you become gun smart. Bob.
 

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http://surplusrifle.com/arisaka/index.asp

This has disassembly pictures, information about ammunition, and is a pretty good newbie basics writeup. It may help.

You're going to need to invest in a couple tools for sake of prudence. I'd strongly recommend getting a .30 caliber bore-snake cleaning tool, some cleaning solvent, and some oil. Arisakas usually have chrome-lined bores, which is kinda like a teflon frying pan- the dirt and grime of powder ash doesn't stick and is easier to clean, but lord knows what kind of spiders and dust has accumulated inside. Best to clear that out.

Also get yourself a good set of safety glasses and earplugs, and or earmuffs. Never shoot without safety gear, especially a new old gun. If something goes wrong, it's better safe than sorry.

Lastly, find yourself a box of modern 7.7mm Japanese Arisaka ammo at a gunshop or online, and go to a range to try it out.

One possible caveat, which I really don't think applies, is that after WW2 some people modified some Arisakas to use .30-06 ammo, because 7.7 wasn't available. .30-06 is longer, and if you shoot a 7.7 in a .30-06 the bullet-end of the case will either shred or stretch pretty phenomenally to fit the enlarged chamber. If you shoot the rifle, and the casing that comes out is way bigger than when it went in, stop shooting it.

Generally the modification was only done to rifles that were modified into sporters or used a lot after the war, and yours doesn't appear to have been, but it's worth knowing it could happen. This is also another really good reason to have safety glasses on.

But what'll probably happen is you'll shoot, miss the target, make a lot of noise, grin like a child, and burn through the rest of the box. Rub your shoulder, wince, grin some more, and pick up and save your cartridge casings- they can be reused, and go home to tell everyone about how awesome your inheritance is.

Pretty soon you'll want a sling and bayo, and then with a little bit more exposure you'll start spending thousands of dollars on Naval Landing Forces helmet covers and Test Type 2 Paratrooper knives....

Congrats, happy holidays, and have fun.

One final recommendation. I assume you're in college. Therefore I assume you're on Facebook. Join the "KEEP YOUR LAWS OFF MY GUNS" group. We can hook you up with local folks to go shooting with, give you a buncha newbie-helping advice, and basically have a rockin' kids-table for us gun-nuts who can still see, hear, and chase women with some hope of catching 'em.
 
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