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Is there a link?

On the old 'Boards there was a link to a sight where I could identify my rifles and bayos. Am I missing it? Is it still here?
 

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hey new member here i have a t99 with mum intact, matching numbers, and good condition but its missing the follower and follower spring. are these parts numbered?
 

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fossil,
No.
 

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Type 99 Short Rifle Datasheets - March 2009

All,

Attached is the March 2009 Type 99 Short Rifle Datasheet. The pdf contains both the front and back pages. Please take the time to fill out and send to the address listed at the bottom of the page or send them to me. Please share the datasheet with other Type 99 Short Rifle owners. IF you find an interesting rifle at a show or in someone collections please take the time and collect the data. Anonymous submissions are okay.

Thanks, Shannon

View attachment Type 99 Short Rifle Datasheet 03-09.pdf
 

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I'm in need of Type 10 "knee mortar' data for an article. Needed are: serial number, year of manufacture, and manufacturer/sub contractor. Critically important are the dates between 1933 and 1937. If you see one at a show PLEASE at least note the SN and date.

There is an obvious error in the Type 10 table in the knee mortar book, a later year has an earlier SN.. I'l like to determine which SN/year is correct and which is in error.
 

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I'm also interested in any matchlock articles/references you might run across. Doss (Ronin48) [email protected]
 

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I am a new member and I have a Japanese rifle scope. I am trying to find out what the value might be. It is marked as follows: Nogoya Kogaka NTC 2.5 X 10 99 No. 1297. The scope has an integral side mount. Thanks
 

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I have a set of T-99 "mystery rear sight wings".I picked these up in a batch of Arisaka parts I'd purchased, and so far, no one has been able to identify them.I've sent them to Fred Honeycutt (they're currently in his possession) and he was going to take them around to different swap meets etc. to see if anyone could identify them.Fred has measured them and found them to be the same thickness as a standard T-99 AA wing, and the first notch on the wing coincides with the standard AA wing as well. His personal opinion is that these may have come off of an "experimental" rifle, but we can't seem to pin down their origin.Take a look at the pics I've attached, and give me your opinions..... Another Arisaka mystery.
 

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I recently picked up, through auction from a gunshop, a Nagoya 27 Series Type 38 that I've been cleaning up. When disassembled, it looked as if it had not been cleaned in a very long time. There was a lot of surface rust and solidified gun oil on the metal parts. The stock was extremely dirty as well.

I followed the advice of Mark on C&Arsenal and boiled the metal parts, then cleaned with 0000 wool and a toothbrush. I then conditioned the metal with Balistol. Everything turned out well and I was able to start looking at numbers on the parts.

My research question involves whether any new information has turned up concerning the dates that the rifles in this series may have been rearsenaled at the Chigusa plant. While disassembling and cleaning the rifle, it appeared that all of the parts had been together for a very long time. However the actual numbers of the parts varied in an extremely odd manner. To give you an idea, here are the parts by number.

Receiver, bolt, mag/trigger guard and wrist tang: 27th Nagoya series 17763 with Mum (763)
Stock: 779 or 79 with Nagoya and Chigusu factory stamps
Handguard, front barrel band and floorplate: 484
Rear sight base/ladder and bolt release: 471
Bottom of receiver/barrel: 859
Dust cover with riveted stop: 858 or 868 (hard to tell)

So it appears that this rifle was rearsenaled and is made up of parts from 6 different rifles. It was then ridden pretty hard, possibly captured, then put away for many years without much care in a humid location.

There is mention in both the Honeycutt/Anthony & McCollom books about Chigusa serving as a primary rearsenal location for the Type 38's, but no real dates available at the times of publication. Is it possible that a rifle as stout as the Type 38 manufactured in the '30's could have also been rearsenaled in the 30's with so many replacement parts?

Just trying to make sense of what I'm working on here...

Thanks for any comments,

Greg
 
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