Gunboards Forums banner
1 - 17 of 17 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
92 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a 6.5 C&H die, a .223 RCBS die, and a .308 Lyman die with broken decapping pins. Not to mention a Lee die that cannot be fixed. Went to the gun shop and bought pins only to find out they don't fit. Bought a RCBS top hat pin that didn't fit the Lyman top hat pin. The straight RCBS .223 pin didn't fit in the RCBS die. Neither pins fit the C&H die which can take a top hat or a straight pin. What a bother. Just letting off some steam here. Another trip to the store tomorrow.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13,422 Posts
I used to break a lot of pins, too. When I started reloading 45+ years ago, you could easily get any type of decapping pin you needed at the local gun shop. This is not so easy anymore.

Just buy a Lee universal decapping die, and just do all your decapping as a separate step.

I actually prefer it that way, as I don't have to deal with the loose primers (AND the grit that comes out with them) at the same time I am handling the clean, lubricated, cases.

I have an old Lyman turret press, and the decapping die is a permanent fixture in one of the turret stations. I NEVER take it out.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,313 Posts
ON pistol dies, my Hornady and RCBS dies on Dillon progressive presses will bust /bend a decapping pin from time to time and I just live with the issue. For rifle I just do as Ronbo does, I use Lee decap die and punch out primers and have no failures of pins. The spindle that hold decap pin has the expander button on it. I noticed a year ago that rifle die sets used for decades appeared to have this spindle a bit bent and it was because of decades of decapping while sizing brass. I replaced all spindles and use them with NO pin in them for RESIZING. THe Lee decap die does all decapping , my reloading dies do not, thus I don't have case necks pulled out of alignment.

Yes its another step in rifle loading process to decap separately but it pays off.
 

·
Gold Bullet member
Joined
·
8,517 Posts
ON pistol dies, my Hornady and RCBS dies on Dillon progressive presses will bust /bend a decapping pin from time to time and I just live with the issue. For rifle I just do as Ronbo does, I use Lee decap die and punch out primers and have no failures of pins. The spindle that hold decap pin has the expander button on it. I noticed a year ago that rifle die sets used for decades appeared to have this spindle a bit bent and it was because of decades of decapping while sizing brass. I replaced all spindles and use them with NO pin in them for decapping. THe Lee decap die does all decapping , my reloading dies do not, thus I don't have case necks pulled out of alignment. Yes its another step in rifle loading process to decap separately but it pays off.
+1. I decap batches of brass with the Lee universal decapper permanently mounted in a Lee classic turret press, where the primers fall through the hollow ram into a container. I then clean the primer pockets and case necks before resizing. I have also removed the decapping pins from my Redding and Forster dies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
188 Posts
I used to break a lot of pins, too. When I started reloading 45+ years ago, you could easily get any type of decapping pin you needed at the local gun shop. This is not so easy anymore.

Just buy a Lee universal decapping die, and just do all your decapping as a separate step.

I actually prefer it that way, as I don't have to deal with the loose primers (AND the grit that comes out with them) at the same time I am handling the clean, lubricated, cases.

I have an old Lyman turret press, and the decapping die is a permanent fixture in one of the turret stations. I NEVER take it out.
This is exactly what I do. I actually do most of my stuff on the Lee Hand press. When I come back from the range, I sort and decap all of my brass. After I tumble it, I resize and expand while sitting in front of the TV. I hand prime them all at that time as well. I go to my press (nowhere near the TV) to charge and seat the bullets.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
128 Posts
After breaking two pins while decapping some older military 30-06 brass I started using a ground down pin punch and small hammer for decapping. I've also slightly bent a spindle on one die set before going to the pin punch and hammer. Manual decapping will help weed out any berdan primers if you are working with picked up range brass and seems to make resizing easier. It's another step but so far it has been worth it, busting a pin is just a PIA worth advoiding if possible. A manual decapper is high on my wish list for toys.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,223 Posts
+1. I decap batches of brass with the Lee universal decapper permanently mounted in a Lee classic turret press, where the primers fall through the hollow ram into a container. I then clean the primer pockets and case necks before resizing. I have also removed the decapping pins from my Redding and Forster dies.
I decap all my dirty brass with a Lee Universal Decapper, then I tumble them in my wet tumbler with ss pins. Brass looks like brand new and the primer pockets and flash holes are completely cleaned.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,346 Posts
I bought my second press in 1971 and I did not want the primer ash in it.
I bought one of the Lee hand punches and began using it. For a while I just raised the expander decapper in the die so the pin was out of the way.
Later I just began remove the decapping pin and that is how still do it.

Over the years I have bought a lot of used dies especially in rare, expensive or hard to find chamberings. Many people seem to bend a decapping rod, get discouraged and then dispose of the dies. Usually if I think the price is too good to be true that is what I get in the mail.

The largest number of bent decapping rods have been RCBS but that is misleading because the number of RCBS dies is about 4X all the other brands put together. I have had fewer bent Reddings but a higher percentage of them have been bent. For some reason people do not use Forster dies much after they buy them. I have never had a bent decapper in a Forster die even though the decapper is not very robust. Most of the reason is the Forster's never look like they were used. I think the highest casualty rate are the Herter's dies - maybe 25% are bent.
Usually I can straighten both Herter's and Redding. I even have a few bent Lee's. Sometimes I can straighten them too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
19,313 Posts
Ireload2: I note your comments above with interest regarding bend decap rods. This is a phenomena rarely mentioned because most reloaders (including me) never look to see ...assuming mere punching primers is low stress and all is well. When it became obvious bent rods were upon me, I was shocked to see how many of my common die sets had this flaw and required new rods to be obtained.

The purchase of a decapping die and adding the separate decap step for rifle brass has solved the problem. For the purpose, one can buy a far more expensive decap die than the Lee but I doubt one will get any better results. It does the mission flawlessly for the last 5 years.

Up until I noticed the bent rods, I had crooked ammo and did not know it. Its amazing any of this ammo shot well at all but it did. Now , with problems with rods solved, I have better accuracy with my reloads so its obvious I was self defeating my reloading efforts for years with bent rods.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,346 Posts
milprileb
Many FL sizing dies can be assembled with the decapping rod off center if the owner is indifferent to the position of the decapping pin. This will almost guarantee damaging something. I am really picky about keeping the interior of my sizing dies clean so they will not scratch the brass. Any die that I take apart to clean allows me to see the decapper. I can also tell when one is off center just by looking. While I was in college I worked in a machine shop and learned the benefits of keeping things concentric. I mostly use a Rockchucker for sizing and it will easily bend and break anything that I might get off center.
I have never traced crooked ammo back to a decapping rod but I have often wondered if that could happen. My first lesson with crooked ammo was with a new .25-06 about the first year that Remington put them on the market. That turned out to be a crooked seater. The bullets had a lot of wobble in the case when rolled across a smooth table top. I put the seater in a lathe and turned it about 500 RPM. The seater stem end of the die wobbled about 1/16". Until that time the .25-06 was an indifferent shooting rifle most groups were about 1 1/2 to 1 3/4. I sent the die back and it was replaced. My normal groups shrank to about 1" and on a really good day that rifle would shoot between 5/8 to 3/4 groups at 100 yards. Because of that lesson I have always tried to insure my dies are good and my ammo is assembled mechanically straight. As a result I do not spend nearly as much time dinking with powder and bullet combinations. Most of my loads go together straight and they shoot well without burning a lot of components.



Ireload2: I note your comments above with interest regarding bend decap rods. This is a phenomena rarely mentioned because most reloaders (including me) never look to see ...assuming mere punching primers is low stress and all is well. When it became obvious bent rods were upon me, I was shocked to see how many of my common die sets had this flaw and required new rods to be obtained.

The purchase of a decapping die and adding the separate decap step for rifle brass has solved the problem. For the purpose, one can buy a far more expensive decap die than the Lee but I doubt one will get any better results. It does the mission flawlessly for the last 5 years.

Up until I noticed the bent rods, I had crooked ammo and did not know it. Its amazing any of this ammo shot well at all but it did. Now , with problems with rods solved, I have better accuracy with my reloads so its obvious I was self defeating my reloading efforts for years with bent rods.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
14,346 Posts
I think the decapping pin in Lee dies are about the toughest I have seen. I have seen a number of bent stems but I have never seen a broken Lee pin. I think he must have specified needles from a needle bearing manufacturer to get the smooth round ended pins.

Sometimes you can find the right size drill bit for a pin. They seem tougher than the factory stuff.
 

·
Gold Bullet Member
Joined
·
701 Posts
I have a 6.5 C&H die, a .223 RCBS die, and a .308 Lyman die with broken decapping pins. Not to mention a Lee die that cannot be fixed. Went to the gun shop and bought pins only to find out they don't fit. Bought a RCBS top hat pin that didn't fit the Lyman top hat pin. The straight RCBS .223 pin didn't fit in the RCBS die. Neither pins fit the C&H die which can take a top hat or a straight pin. What a bother. Just letting off some steam here. Another trip to the store tomorrow.
FYI
Lee Guarrentee's all their dies for life no matter if your the original owner or not.. also.. rcbs pins come in 2 diffrent sizes.. you can order directly from rcbs and from Lee no need to go to the store that may or may not have what your looking for..
and i like lots of other have said use a lee universal decaper and decap all my brass by hand... yes it takes more time but i handle each and every case that way and pay more attention to it's condition.. also.. decapping by hand lets you know if your primer pocket is worn out.. if you can almost push it out by hand... that case goes in the scrap bin...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,152 Posts
I use lee dies and the seem to come from the factory ready to slip ... that is, if you apply enough force to break the pin, instead it just slips the friction ring and you have to reset it and wrench it back down. I do not know about the other brands -- do they not slip when too much force is applied? If its possible to loosen up the pin you might save breakage in the future, if your dies work that way (?). I can't imagine how hard one would have to pull on the press handle to break those things but it sounds like excessive force was used.
 

·
Gold Bullet Member
Joined
·
2,162 Posts
I had understood Lee would replace broken pins so I went to their website and found the following.

http://leeprecision.net/support/index.php?/Knowledgebase/Article/View/102/0/broken-decapper
Broken decapper
Posted by on 19 October 2011 01:58 PM
If you return the broken decapper to the factory, it will be replaced at no charge. Be sure and include the type of die and what the caliber is.

Our address is:

Lee Precision, Inc.
4275 Highway "U"
Hartford, WI 53027

Otherwise, You can order replacement parts via our web site, at www.leeprecision.com Search for the product that you need parts for, and then click on the red link "Click here to view parts" in the product description. This should bring up a listing of replacement parts for the item selected.

The trick to adjusting the decapper is to just tighten the decapper clamp enough so that the decapper will push out 90% of the primers, but the very stubborn ones will cause the decapper to slide up through the clamp. Start with the decapper clamp just tight enough to keep the decapper from falling out the bottom of the die. Try to resize a case. The decapper will probably slide up through the decapper clamp. Tap the decapper back down flush with the top of the decapping clamp, tighten the clamp another 1/8 turn, and try again. Repeat until you successfully deprime the case.

So if you have a broken or bent decapper pin I would contact Lee and see if they will replace it.
Worse they can do is say no,

grey
 
1 - 17 of 17 Posts
Top