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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello, I'm looking at an early Husqvarna 1640 with steel bottom metal for a project. The action is sound, BUT the floor plate latch is broken. It looks like a regular strip of sheet metal bent to the right shape so it holds the floorplate closed. How difficult would it be to replace the latch?

If I have to replace the bottom metal, then that rifle doesn't make financial sense for me to use. Also, is $300 a fair price on a well worn, but mechanically sound 1640 in .270 Win? I'm looking for a donor action to build a 6.5x55 and a husky seems like the natural choice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I decided to pass on the Husky. It was just a little too rough for $300. I did however, find a "store branded" FN Mauser a few towns over on sale for $190 in better condition with the old Bauch and Lomb scope (the kind with the adjustments in the mount instead of the scope). I know it isn't Swedish, but I'll put up pics tomorrow.

I really want a 6.5x55, but from what I've read about the accuracy of these FNs, it might be a shame to pull the barrel off, even though I need another 30-06 like I need a hole in the head.
 

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Why not use a M96 action? Samco Global in Florida has M96 and M38 barreled actions, I beleive. You could give them a call and ask if they have one with a good barrel. I have built two sporters out of a M94 and a M38, they were all ready drilled and tapped, got them cheap off Gun Broker. They both shoot good especially the M94. Light short, handy rifles.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I've thought about the 96, but my dad had a Kimber sporterized Swede in 6.5x55 about 15 years ago. It shot fine as I recall, but neither of us could warm up to the cock on closing action. Plus, I happened into a good deal on a 98.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Well, this is my 2nd FN mauser 30-06. The other is set up for a Lyman 57 peep. It isn't in as nice a condition. I think the prior owner got it from a DNR auction because it has a number (evidence number?) lightly engraved in the front ring. It was also my first attempt at restocking a rifle (salvaging a cast off Bishop blank with a bad bedding job). I might keep the new one as an '06 and put that one under the knife.

Here are a couple of quick pics as promised.



Also, to keep it relevant to Sweden, here's my Husqvarna 1640 in 9.3x62 that I finished a few weeks ago. I'm very much an amateur at restocking rifles, but it doesn't look too bad (as long as you don't look too closely that is.... ). The stock was a regular Boyds walnut for a large ring 98 that I modified to fit. I epoxy bedded everything in place. For as cheap as that stock was, it's actually a pretty nice piece of walnut!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well, I tried the rifle today. Depending on your perspective, I either made a huge mistake, or averted a huge mistake. It is way too good a shooter for me to take apart. My conscience just won't let me. The first three shots (in the pouring rain, with an old 5x scope, and a bore I forgot to clean, with Winchester ammo that's older than me) went into 1" at 100 yards. The next three opened it up to a bit less than 1.5" With zero load development, under non-ideal conditions, I'm VERY impressed with the accuracy.

I really don't want to tear my other one down either, since it has a chrome lined Hi-Standard barrel, so I guess my project is on the back burner for now.
 

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Hi Dan-o, the Boyd-stocked Husky looks pretty good! My stock has a crack and i will also try a Boyds, but i´m in doubt because the 1640 is called small ring and they sell only large rings stocks. Can you show and explain a little bit more of your work with pics, there are well some other members who think about re-stocking!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I'd be happy to explain, but depending on how big the crack in your stock it, it might be easier to just repair it. I hope I can help you avoid some of the mistakes I made (and there are many if you look closely). The stock I used is for a large ring mauser. There is a little gap around the sides of the front receiver ring, but I don't mind. They could be filled if they bother you. If you can find a stock for a small ring 98 that has the right screw spacing, it would be a better fit. I think a Kar98a stock would be perfect, but I don't know if Boyds makes one.

My basic process was to use improvised gunsmithing black (kiwi shoe polish and gun oil mixed together) with a chisel and VERY careful use of a dremel on LOW speed for some spots internally that were hard to reach. You will have to cut through the back cross bolt to accomodate the Husky trigger guard. The dremel is great for that. Just work slowly and remove the black marks after you retest the action. I recommend you COVER the outside of the stock in masking tape (seriously, mumify it!!!) to keep from getting shoe polish all over. You'll end up sanding it anyway, but it still gets annoying and messy.

I also pillar bedded the rear screw. Rather than buy one, I used a brass pipe nipple of the right size from the hardware store. Cut to the same length as the one in your cracked stock, and go to town.

I glass bedded everything, so the fact that it wasn't a perfect fit around the recoil lug area was ok.

OK, lessons I learned:

1. GO SLOWLY!! It's much easier to take material off than to add it back.
2. If the safety won't engage, it is probably NOT because there is too much wood around it. It could be that the bolt isn't able to close all the way because the bolt notch isn't deep enough. I made that mistake and you can see that I removed too much material from around the safety trying to make it work.
3. Conversely, if you take too much from the bolt notch, the bolt will close too far (yes, that seems weird, but it happens) and you will be able to engage the safety when it isn't cocked. I still need to figure out how to add just a tiny bit back to prevent that on mine.
4. cut the bolt release notch LAST. Mark the spot with everything else screwed into the stock. In hindsight, I would even do it after I glass bedded. You should have the trigger and bolt release removed from the receiver anyway while you're fitting. The action will move around move than you think in the final fitting and you can easily end up with an oversided one like mine.
5. I did the rough ontouring around the safety area with a course file before sanding. It worked great! Save the sawdust from the file work as it is "cleaner" than what comes from sanding with sandpaper and makes better filler material when mixed with glue.
6. Put release agent on EVERYTHING when you glass bed. Thankfully, I didn't make this mistake. Every piece of metal gets a double coat. I use Turtle Wax for cars and it works great. Also, I put Turtle wax on all my rifle actions before I put them back in the stock. It helps protect the metal against water much better than oil or grease and doesn't soak into the stock and degrade the wood over time.
7. When I bedded the stock, I had a moment of panic that I glued it into the stock permanantly when I tried to take it out. If this happens to you, be patient. You probably did a better job than you think and it just takes some work to coax it out the first time.

I'll think about it more tonight and see if there's any part of the process I missed. I'll also get some pics up sometime tomorrow, but be warned that this is the first stock I've ever done. I am an amateur with pretty basic tools, so don't take my word or techniques as gospel.
 

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Wow Dan-o,
thanks for that comprehensiv explanation! I´m an amateur too and got my knowledge in woodworks from youtube and books but fixed the crack sometimes ago by drilling and glueing plus installed a crossbolt.
It work´s pretty well since that, but the main reason for a new stock is that though my scope is allready low mounted, my cheek is a bit too high while aiming.
I like Husqvarnas 50s´ style in walnut, it looks both retro and modern but a laminated, thumbholed, highcombed stock is more suitable for a quick shot.
I would prefer a Richards Microfit Stock that fits than a Boyds but unfortunately they won´t ship to Europe.
If i´ll ever get a 98% fit stock i sure will follow your advises, your points 1 to 7 seems crucial by experience so once again thanks for your reply!
 

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Rhoenradheizer I had a similar conclusion to you in regards to repair vs restocking. I'm going to have to put in a crossbolt and put in a schnabel where the front 3" of my 1640's stock is cracked but I'd rather that than spend more money for a stock that needs to be inletted and bedded anyway.
 

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tomas.mattias
that´s it! I like my rifle in original walnut! Two weeks ago we shot on a 270 meter range and i reached 2 inch circles with Möller copper bullets. Don´t know if it could become better with a more ergonomic stock and besides
it´s hard to spend the money for to loose the Husky look...
But sometimes i need a new project in particular when house, garden and car are allright!http://forums.gunboards.com/images/icons/wink2.jpg
 

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One glass letting problem made a lot of time:
when more wood is taken looses metal to wood proper fit ...proper hight, angles of action to reciever related to wood.....
changes tipping the action up or down.... All changing harmonics, barrel gaps, magazine tilts, twisting binding actions ...... Action bedding block hitting top or bottoming out bouncing when shot or one side to another not even in bearing surface touching.....
I have had to re bed many of another's mistakes....only showing up in groups, binding bolts, triggers....bolts hitting wood affecting groups on target not before the glassing jobs.....bought inaccurate guns...re bedded to extreme accuracy....other brands.....never had to bed a husky I bought or traded up to 98 percent to new in box keepers, examples ....ever the 95 percent-ers shot accurately....steeping stone to the same modle later in better shape.....

luck and knowledge run hand in hand....research pillar bedding two or three pressure points , free floating,
Barrel tip pressure points, bedding barrel channels., adding metal to bedding materials, without feurals with..
...look read make notes....ask questions....find some one to be the third hand....helping if needed be!
 
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