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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Anyone know any tricks or ideas to remove a couple of super tight screws on and old rifle. I do not want to damage them, but cannot get them loose. Incidentally I am working on cleaning the dirt and cosmoline from a mauser rifle and the two screws on the underbelly of the rifle are the rough ones. I've never had this situation before, and I guess if I had to I coulf leave them, but it would be better to clean if I could. Thanks,

Pontic27
 
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Try spraying them with penetrating oil. I like kroil but wd40 will work. Put some on once or twice a day from several days. Use the right screwdriver, a hollow ground aka gunsmithing screwdriver. It does not have a taper to the thickness of the blade so you don't wallow out the head of the screw.You can get the cheap ones at walmart but they can be a litttle brittle and break when bearing down with them. also try applying heat with a solding iron or pencil torch. be careful not to scorch the wood with a pencil torch or not to overheat the screw because it can change the tempering of the metal and soften it. The heat can really help by causing the metal to expand and contract which can help threads break loose. This can also help the penatration oil get better penatration. I have had sucess with difficult screws doing this.

Good luck,

Jim
 

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First , make sure your screwdriver fits properly.
Second , get a liquid or spray penetrant and apply and then tap it to work into the threads.
Last option is to apply heat , but not too much.
 

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Old mechanics trick...
Find a screwdriver where the blade exactly matches the slot so as not to ding up or distort the screw.
Attach vice grips to the handle.
While you push down and apply steady pressure, have someone tap the head of the screwdriver with a hammer. Light rapping often breaks it free.
One of the most useful tools I own is a Cornwall impact screw driver.
Accepts different bits and rotates in a camming action when struck with a hammer. It will remove the most stubborn frozen screw.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
hey guys thanks for the advice. I will try some penetrating spray the next few days and take it from there. I do have a good fitting screwdriver and have been real careful as to not tear up the screw- that was my main concern. I hate when I see that on nice looking guns. I guess if all else fails I will try some heat. Thanks for the replies, it is really helpful for me.

pontic27
 

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I like putting a file/chisel in the screw slot, and heating up the tool with a torch so that the heat transfers to the screw. I then spray an inverted air duster can so that the duster gas comes out as a liquid and quickly cools down the area.
 

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Oak Leaves with Clusters Member
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On a really tight screw, I've used penetrating oil, tapping the screw to try to dislodge it and finally heating (and cooling since heating enlarges the screw) to dislodge it. That finally worked.

On another thread, I read a lot of positive comments about Chapman gunsmithing screwdrivers. They are relatively inexpensive - less than $30/set. There are two different sets with a different number of tips. The smaller set #9600 included everything I needed for Mosins. I got it at Amazon.

I haven't needed it yet and hope it works well; I am mainly repeating the great things I heard from people with much bigger collections than me.
 

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Re: On another thread, I read a lot of positive comments about Chapman gunsmithing screwdrivers. They are relatively inexpensive - less than $30/set. There are two different sets with a different number of tips. The smaller set #9600 included everything I needed for Mosins. I got it at Amazon

A Chapman driver set is a good investment, maybe even essential, for anyone who values his firearms. I've had one for 30 years and keep it in my range bag.

The previously mentioned impact driver is also a useful tool. In addition to its obvious purpose, I like having a solid, thick grip near to the recalcitrant screw head.
 

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Something not mentioned so far.

If possible place the gun on the floor and hold it with your feet so it is very stable.

Added with edit>>>>clean the slot of the screw out thouroughly before attempting any removal. Also if possible using a chisel or the shaft of an old screwdriver (handle gone) rap it with a hammer to apply some impact force to break loose the rust bond.

Using a perfectly fitting screwdriver try just slightly tightening the screw. Even if it only moves the smallest amount it will break the rust bond. On most flat tip screwdrivers you can used and adjustable wrench near the tip to get better leverage, but don't go ballistic.

If you can get the screw to move the slightest amount in either direction, then start moving it just slightly in both directions. Be patient if you get it to move at all, go for the slightest increases in the amount you can move the screw. It may even be necessary to back it out and tighten it many times before you completely defeat the rust bond.

Of course if you can get any penetrating oil to the threaded area, do so. In many cases it is practically impossible to do so without drowning the gun in oilm which I prefer to avoid.

Thirty years as a mechanic working on thousands of buggered and rusted in place screws.

Worst cas scenario you may have to center drill and grind the head off the screw to get the gun apart. Then you can soak it in penetrating oil and get some real heat to it and get the rest of the screw out with vise grips, last resort of course.

Never been beaten by any screw since LBJ was president.

regards
badger
 
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