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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Just got this one in today and wanted share. A 1945 Remington Rand in original shipping box, which was surplused and sold through the DCM back in the 60s. The "blotches" and discolored areas you see on the metal surfaces is residue of the preservative from the green oil cloth/paper which has stuck to the gun.
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Very nice. I have seen quite a few from DCM in the 1960s. Most were late Rem Rands.

I am surprised I can not see Blanchard roundish milling marks on the slide on one this late. Can you see them in hand? I am beginning to believe they used both types milling just after 2 million serial number to the end.? I have one just a bit into where blanchard was supposed to start but it does not have them and it is minty original. For those who may have noticed the difference in slide and frame color is the norm for later serial number RRs.

The grip material looks more like was used post war but it probably just my eyes. Does it have the normal Keyes with the T reinforcement?

The stampings are good. Many were stamped before finish making them look shallower. The ordnance stamp is much stronger and well struck than most. Finish loss in the stamp is nice and correct since it was stamped after finish.

Thanks for posting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 · (Edited)
I am surprised I can not see Blanchard roundish milling marks on the slide on one this late. Can you see them in hand? I am beginning to believe they used both types milling just after 2 million serial number to the end.? I have one just a bit into where blanchard was supposed to start but it does not have them and it is minty original. For those who may have noticed the difference in slide and frame color is the norm for later serial number RRs.

The grip material looks more like was used post war but it probably just my eyes. Does it have the normal Keyes with the T reinforcement?
Mike, the Blanchard milling marks are there, but the metal surface is kind of lightly coated in the cosmoline from the paper that the Rand is wrapped in. I gently wiped the slide down with break free and you can clearly see them. You can also make out the Rockwell hardness dimple/mark on the slide as well.

As far as the grips, they are legit Keyes with the T reinforcement. The screws havn't been turned since they were turned to put the grips on in 1945, so I don't want to bugger them trying to remove the grips just to see what is obviously correct. It is kind of tough to get a clear shot due to the angle, but you can clearly see the "K-star" on the inside.

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I am certainly not a 1911 expert, but as a point of reference to you gentleman, a "Blanchard" is a grinder. Between the cosmoline, the Parkerizing, in the photo it is hard to tell if it is from a Blanchard, but it sure looks like it.

Blanchard was a faster process than the milling they may have previously done. Loading a table on a Blanchard with 1911 slides would be a LOT of 1911 slides. I ran a really small Blanchard, with a 36" diameter table. I'd guess loading and unloading took considerably longer than the actual grinding.

Beautiful gun, and a wonderful piece of history. Thanks for sharing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I am certainly not a 1911 expert, but as a point of reference to you gentleman, a "Blanchard" is a grinder. Between the cosmoline, the Parkerizing, in the photo it is hard to tell if it is from a Blanchard, but it sure looks like it.

Blanchard was a faster process than the milling they may have previously done. Loading a table on a Blanchard with 1911 slides would be a LOT of 1911 slides. I ran a really small Blanchard, with a 36" diameter table. I'd guess loading and unloading took considerably longer than the actual grinding.

Beautiful gun, and a wonderful piece of history. Thanks for sharing.
Yes, Remington Rand began to use the Blanchard grinding process on slides starting around serial 2mm in an effort to speed up production. The semi-circular grind marks on the slide indicate that this one was finished using that process.
 

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Beauty of Blanchard grinder being the wheel and table rotate for a nice flat cross hatch surface and automatic down feed .Used one for years to grind Caterpillar transmission plates .Replaced by a larger Madison grinder.

As you can see in this 1940's Springfield Armory, the Blanchard grinder being used to surface the lathe blanks that will eventually become rear sight apertures for the M1.
 

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Outstanding M1911A1. How much do you want to bet there will be some postings discussing the type of ammo (FMJ, hollow point, etc.) you should shoot in it! There are people in the world, when God was passing out brains and said "Come forth." They came fifth.
 
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Thanks for the additional pictures clearly showing Blanchard use. I felt pretty sure the grips were OK but the post war grips are so close on the outside it is hard to tell sometimes if they are Keyes WW2. One had a little ding or something at the bottom of the screw area, quite possibly more of the original lube, which was not cosmoline or grease but a dip in brown thick oil. Over the years it becomes hard and almost like finger nail polishcrusty. You need not remove them to see the backs, just take the mag out and use a flashlight or touch with a finger. No need here anyway as they are pretty surely original.

I have been using the term Blanchard Milling marks as most collectors have for many years. Collectors know what you mean regardless of exact correctness of terms but good to know the correct term regardless.
 
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