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I recently acquired a Model 8 in 35 Remington. It will not extract/eject when firing. I have lightly polished the extractor and the groove it rides in on the bolt. I have also cleaned the chamber using a brass 410 brush and some very fine steel wool wrapped around it with oil on it, run at low to mid speed on a cordless drill. It still seems as though something is causing the dummy rounds I have for it to stick in the chamber and slip the extractor. I have another extractor on order, what else can I do for the chamber? I also have a .30 caliber 8 and the dummy rounds for that one do not stick in the chamber at all. I'm completely stumped at this point but I don't want to give up on this rifle.
 

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Congrats on the Model 8 ownership and kudos for the particularly desirable .35 Rem chambering! Now... Don't give up! That said, personally no answer, but statement of overall condition would probably be useful. Be frank! We seldom recommend "Do Not Rescussitate" tags and doesn't sound serious situation of itself. Someone likely to be along with assist. If not soon & sufficient, perhaps 'doubling down'. Making another Thread in the Workbench Forum for assistance there and better oriented for such help.
We always like photos here. Full 'centerfold please as minimal! :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
3748508


Here they are. The top one is the 30 Remington, made in 1922. The bottom is the 35 Remington, made in 1907 going by serial number, no barrel code on it. Second year production. The 30 was refinished sometime in it's life, not a professional job, but not poor by any means. The 35 seems to be original from what I can tell. Plenty of finish wear on the receiver, but functional for the most part. The ammo I'm using in the 35 is new production Marlin (Remington core-lokt with a different headstamp) 200gr soft point. The dummy rounds I have are from J&M Spec, they are brass case with round nose bullet, Remington brass was used to make them.
 

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Big thanks for the 'centerfolds'! Both nice guns, but for me the early original appearing .35 Rem chambering, as 'pick of the litter'! Our GB participation seems a bit slow lately. Likely combo of new format, election crossfires, virus and all the other "S"! As said, extractor problem sounds in 'nusiance' category. I'd be particularly to own either gun but particularly the .35! For info, the Remington mo/yr commercial date code didn't start until 1921. Sure is handy and considerably more accurate than SN/year indexes!
Thanks again for the pix and good luck with that extractor!
Best & Stay Safe
John
 

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Is the Extractor a correct one for 35Remington?
It should have '35' stamped on the front upper face of it.
The Model 8 style extractor has it's lip that engages the shell rim contoured (rounded) to match the case rim.
An extractor from a Model 81 will fit, but that lip will be cut straight across,,no contour to offer a better grab on the case.
(The Model 81 35Rem extractor should be marked '35' as well.

The 25, 30, and 32 cal all use the same extractor. They are either not marked, or are marked '30'.
The 300Savage M81 used the 35Rem cal extractor.

There should be some tension in the extractor. That from a slight bow in the tang of the extractor itself.
It slides into the channel on the top of the bolt, but you should have to lift the front claw up slightly under some spring pressure of that bow to seat it into the bolt head slot.

If it doesn't have any tension, the case can just drop free or be left in the chamber or somewhere in betw.

If the extractor is a '30' the claw will be extended too far and the extractor can't latch over the rim and onto the case.
That can spring the extractor after a few rounds and leave it with that 'bow' I mentioned. Then it really won't work!

You said the rifle wouldn't extract or eject during firing and then mentioned dummy rounds.
Did you do a live fire test?
The gun actually extracts and ejects from the bbl & bolt being in the full rear position during recoil. The bolt is then locked momentarily in that position as the bbl returns forward.
In that bbl returning forward is when the case is pulled from the chamber and ejected . Kind of backwards from what most think of the bolt as pulling the case from the bbl.
When the bbl returns full forward,,the bolt is unlocked and goes forward to strip the next round from the mag and chamber it.
The Browning long recoil system. That's why the double shuffle feeling to the recoil.

If during live fire the 'bolt lock' does not catch and keep the bolt locked in that rear most position while the bbl starts and continues forward,,the fired case will not be extracted nor ejected.
The bolt lock is inside up against the left side wall of the frame.
You can check to see if it is working OK w/o taking things apart though.

With the rifle unloaded of course..
Place the butt on the floor.
Place a stout cleaning rod down the bore and against the breech bolt face.
Now push,,hard,,keep pushing. Keep your hand(s) on the end of the cleaning rod.

You will push the bolt along with the bbl locked together ..
Push it all the way back till the bolt is passed the ejection port.
At this point the bolt will (should) get locked in place by that 'Bolt Lock' and held there.
The bbl assembly should/will come forward with a loud snap!,,so get ready for that.

The Bolt should stay in the locked/open position.

If it does all this, The Bolt Lock is fine.
You just simulated firing one round and then the breech locked open after the last shot.

Any problem with extraction,ejection would be in that extractor itself I would believe.
Instead of dummy rounds, I would carefully try live rounds for simple extrction. Or take a couple live rounds and pull the bullets and dump the powder.
Using factory sized cases may make a difference.

About all I can offer long distance!.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
3749605


The extractor is a 35 extractor. I did live fire the rifle. Barrel cycled back like it's supposed to, bolt locked, barrel went forward. Shell came out of the barrel and just layed on top of the magazine. I'll link to a slo-mo video I took of it cycling.


As I said, the live ammo I used is 200 grain soft point Marlin (Remington core-lokt with a different headstamp).
 

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Looks to my totally amateur eye like it extracted the shell just fine:
3749647


Bolt is all the way back and the shell is all the way back/out. Have you considered that the ejector is not ejecting it?
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Looks to my totally amateur eye like it extracted the shell just fine:
View attachment 3749647

Bolt is all the way back and the shell is all the way back/out. Have you considered that the ejector is not ejecting it?
Don't know how that could be. The ejector seems to have plenty of tension on it. When I run dummy rounds through it, they stick in the chamber, even after i cleaned/polished with steel wool on a brass brush.
 

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Check brass - I'd wonder about the cartridges you're using! Check headspace? Wonder about either rotary chamber polishing or very light-hand kiss with chambering reamer in case of irregularities. Radical, yes but if most all else fails.
Just shooting in dark here! Bet anything, yet something simple!
Hang in there!
Best & Stay Safe!
John
 

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The action is different than what a modern rifle uses. The barrel moves back in recoil. Now, not being an expert or even having ever seen one of those in person, from your high speed vid (cool) it appears to me that the barrel and bolt come back in recoil, then the bolt stays back holding the shell while the barrel returns forward without the shell, then something happens that makes the shell eject. Perhaps that "something" is not happening? Go frame by frame and you can see the shell out of the barrel. It is fully extracted. Maybe a high speed video of your working rifle might show when the "something" is supposed to happen. I would guess it would be as the barrel returns to the forward position or maybe just as the bolt starts to move forward?
 

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The case is ejected as the bolt is locked to the rear position.
The extractor is hanging onto the case by the upper portion of the case rim.
At the same time the spring powered ejector is compressed into the face of the bolt by the chambered round.
As such it is putting forward pressure on the bottom edge of the base of the case.

As the barrel starts it's forward movement and the breech bolt is still locked to the rear,,the case is pulled from the chamber. Better stated,,the barrel is moving forward & away from the case as the case is still attached to the face of the locked into place bolt.

That case has ejector spring plunger tension against it on it's bottom edge as it sets in the chamber and that tension
continues to push against the case untill the front edge of the case clears the chamber of the forward moving bbl.
At that instant, that spring tension flips the case upwards and out of the ejection port. The pivoting point being the extractor which is hanging onto the upper edge of the rim of the case.

The 'modern; Remington 700 rifle and quite a number of other firearms use the same idea for extraction/ejection. The spring loaded plunger & extractor as a pivoting point. The case mearly needing to clear the bbl/chamber edge to be flipped out of the port.
Even the Winchester 1892 rifle/carbine uses a spring loaded plunger for an ejector.
Nothing new.

If the case is just left sitting on the magazine follower instead of being thrown free of the Remington,,and the ejector plunger itself is not jammed from debris (works freely and has sufficient spring pressure), then I would next look at the extractor claw to see if it is dropping the case off the face of the bolt prematurely.
If this is happening, it often happens along with a weak spring in the ejector plunger.
But a bad extractor can just leave the case partially extracted manually. Or when live firing, can let the go early during extraction (it should hold onto the case all the way through the cycle as it acts as the pivoting point).
When it lets go of the case early during live fire is when you often find the case lying on top of the mag follower.

The extractor should have some tension to it. The extended arm of the part should have a 'bow' to it so that when installing it it takes some springing effort to install.
W/O that, it will act lazy and you can get poor extraction.
 
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