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These commercial guns are a bit outside of my realm of interest but I'm trying to help a Family member determine a reasonable value.




3) Remington Fieldmaster 121 and I think it was made in 1938. Someone drilled and tapped the receiver and barrel to install dovetails for the Japanese made Swift scope.



 

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Check out GB. Some on there up to 6 bills . Is it a smooth bore?
You know Condition is everything. Im afraid the drill and tap job hurt the price severely.
 

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Check out GB. Some on there up to 6 bills . Is it a smooth bore?
You know Condition is everything. Im afraid the drill and tap job hurt the price severely.
No, not a smooth bore. Prices are all over the place on GB. I consider this one a "shooter" because of the modification. I've been told that this model is one of, if not the best, pump action .22 rifles ever made. I'm going to have to take it to the range and find out.... :)
 

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i bought a very nice winchester model 61 made in 1940 for 300.00 and took the 3/4" cheap weaver scope off and put a baby 4x redfield on it. it,s a super shooter for a cheap price with older winchester workmenship. and i think your remington 121 will be just as good.
 

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Silver Bullet Member
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Wow. That's remarkably similar in design. I know the Remington Fieldmaster 121 came out in 1936. When did the Winchester model 61 come out?
 

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22 market is a bit soft, has been for a bit unless the firearm is mint,


however,

in this area, $350-400
 

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Thanks gentlemen!

So Remington copied the Winchester, it seems. Maybe they both copied something else. I don't know enough about these old .22 rifles.
 

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Nah, Remington didn't copy Winchester, they both upgraded their earlier offerings. Winchester had a pump .22 before Remington did though. The Model 1890 was an exposed hammer pump rifle designed by Saint John himself and it took twenty years for Remington to wait out the patented goodness till they could bring out their very fine Model 12 hammerless. Then the race was on.
The practice of obtaining a modified version of those most excellent .22s is something I personally condone wholeheartedly. Blue steel and walnut trumps all. What matters a reblue, d/t, sanded, or other sin that the we Mauser/fill in the blanks collectors shun as a sinful act when we can actually use those. 22s the way they were ment to be used. With scopes mounted, those early long barrels are usually way more accurate than the person on the trigger. Just plain fun for a reasonable price. It makes no sense at all to downgrade a mint/investment grade firearm with every day use when it's modified mirror image can be utilized instead and still be worth the 250/350 a fellow pays for one.
Nice rifles fellas!!
 

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Wow. That's remarkably similar in design. I know the Remington Fieldmaster 121 came out in 1936. When did the Winchester model 61 come out?
Remington 121 was an upgrade/modernization of the John Pedersen designed Remington 12. Winchester was late getting to a hammerless pump .22 partly because they didn't want to cut into the sales of their John Browning designed hammer pump .22s (1890, 1906 and 62). Savage and Remington were far ahead of Winchester in marketing a hammerless .22.
If I recall the story, Winchester looked earlier at introducing a hammerless .22 but FN brought out another John Browning design (the trombone) and some reached the US. Story was that Winchester worried that their design might infringe Browning patents and delayed the introduction of the Model 61. (I recall this story from Bill Ward's book "Walnut and Steel II, probably also is contained in Schwing's books on Winchester pump .22s. I admit I didn't check but that's what I recall. I DO know for a fact that Savage and Remington had hammerless guns on market couple decades before Winchester.)
My reprint 1940 Shooter's Bible (the Stoeger catalog) shows Stoeger marketing both 61 Winchester and 121 Remington retailing for same price. They weren't cheap guns but were cheaper than the premium autoloader .22s of the day, although about the same era both Remington and Winchester were introducing more popularly priced .22 semiautos that were substantially cheaper than the top of the line Winchester 63(Thomas Johnson design, like Winchester 12 pump shotgun, etc.) or Remington 24/241 rifles (Browning patents).
 

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My Winchester Model 63 shoots and feels like a 'top o' the line' rifle. Reblued some 45 years ago, it sees very frequent use culling the rodent population around the farm. Keep it reasonably clean and use Hi-Speed type ammo and failures are the odd faulty round.
I would like to scope it as the receiver is grooved but the guy who blued it polished the top enough that the clamp on rings won't clamp on tight enough. Maybe some Redfield types will work but I haven't stumbled into a pair.
Eastbank's 61 is just right, yesir! Folks who walk on by rifles like ours and bitch about the price of a safe queen, then buy a semi with bells, whistles, lights, radar, and a computer controled night vision heat seeking scope are missing out on the fun, I think?? Well, old school plinking fun anyway.:rolleyes::rolleyes:
 

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Thanks for the history lesson on these old .22 rifles, gentlemen! Interesting stuff.
 
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