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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Back in the 1990's I got this old Remington 512 Sport master which belonged to my Father n law's Dad.
The rifle was patina finish from poor storage and neglect but apparently fired very little if at all.

When I first test fired it ,it jammed every shot . Never really tried to fix ,just put it in safe and forgot about it.

Fast forward ,got it out last week for a test run ,same old issue only worse.
My search over on rimfire central and other sources turned up several possibilities.
Most seam to point to the function of carrier and cartridge stop.As they fit together via a small boss and rub each other when cycled.

The assembly is held in place by staked screw which looked untouched from factory.
Once removed revealed hard dry oil varnish between the two.

So soaked parts in acetone followed by burnish with scotchbright.
Little CLP and back together they went.

The adjustment screw you tight all the way and back off until spring releases carrier(click) .
Also found some burring on feed ramp tube junction. Detail cleaned mag tube.

Voila functions as designed.

Test target and record fire target shows how well they can shoot.
Need to get some target ammo before fine tuning but its a shooter.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
This is the pivot adjusting screw originally staked from factory. This controls resistance on the carrier to cartridge stop fit. And controls whether carrier pops up rear of cartridge at correct timing.
Once adjusted a tiny stake into slot will hold it.
May be possible to flush out with break free CLP once a year or so .
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Oh and this pivot screw passes through ,sear linkage, ejector, carrier,and cartridge stop.
I found no wear on any parts just simple old oils turned varnish making the parts stick.

Rifle was made in 1950 and probably had little to no maintenance.
 

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Absolutely one of the first things to do with old guns (especially old .22's), clean and clean again.
Decades worth of oil mixed with powder residue mixed with who knows what for bullet lubricant and you get a perfect storm for various malfunctions.
Both my Remington Model 24's and my Model 14 responded well to a full on detail cleaning.
Getting oil varnish off is a bear though........
 
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