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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
All,

Please find attached reloading articles and data for 8mm Nambu, 9mm Japanese Pistol, 7.7mm and 6.5mm Japanese Rifle. This is the data I promised from the previous post regarding Lee vs Dillion progressive loaders. The 8mm and 9mm are from Midway USA. My article was written a few years ago so some of the prices are a little dated, but I think the arguments are still valid. My .220 swift converstion to 6.5mm is too large for posting as well as data using pull-down 7.62R componets. I also have worked up loads using Accurate #5 for 8mm Nambu. As I find the time, I'll post that data as well.

I recommend one of the Moderator post these as stickies, or establish a reloading section so others (hint hint) can post their pet loads and share experience.

NOTE: I assume no liability if you screw this up. Know what the hell you are doing, work loads up and be careful. Its your life, but I hate to see you ruin a perfectly good gun.

Finally, those of you that have emailed or PMed me for data please let me know if this does not suffice. If not, I will email directly.

Enjoy, Shannon
 

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Shannon,

There is a reloading section. ;)
 

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Thanks, Shannon , thats nice ,well written and detailed loading information you have there..I didnt learn anything new (except for the converting 220 swift which I may try one of these day) but it was a nice concise refresher.winter is my time to load ammo, and your data is putting me in the mood to get started again.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Dave/Ike,

I was about ready to go ballistic, but as the saying goes if you don't have anything nice say then keep thy mouth shut so I will.

So let me caveat my post. The articles are intended for novice reloaders or experienced reloaders with little to no experience reloading Japanese.

Ike, correct me if I am wrong, but I don't see a sticky on the Japanese board specifically set aside to answer or discuss reloading Japanese calibers, load development, brass forming etc...

Respectfully, Shannon
 

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Shannon,

Most folks will end up in the reloaders board. Your article will be perfect for those looking into German, Japanese calibers.

BTW, I really liked the article. I always learn something!
 

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Thanks, Shannon , thats nice ,well written and detailed loading information you have there..I didnt learn anything new (except for the converting 220 swift which I may try one of these day) but it was a nice concise refresher.winter is my time to load ammo, and your data is putting me in the mood to get started again.
Don't bother with it.

I read about and tried the Swift conversion to 6.5 x 50 years and years ago. Whole lot of trouble as Swift brass (pre Midway period) was just as scarse around here. And, you end up with really, really thick case necks which have to be reamed.:(
 

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I tried the .220 Swift conversion. I found the cases bulged quite a bit and only lasted two loads. I got a sizing die from Riceone (thank you) and converted .243 Winchester cases. These work great and have no bulge after firing. I have a Hornady neck sizing die and will just neck size now. I also have some new Prvi Partizan 6.5 cases that I have used in my Type 44. That has a tighter chamber than the Type 38 rifle and carbine I have so they don't bulge much. I might convert some .243 cases for that also though.
Regards
Peter.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Gentlemen,

Thank you. This is the kind of discussion I like.

Agree the .220 is a pain, but once formed it works great. I had not noticeable issues the neck thickness.

I tried using Riceone's sizing die for .308 WIN, but had problems. I had not considered using the .243 WIN instead - great idea.

Ike, I hear your point. My argument is we can use this forum as the end all, be all for all things Japanese.

Take care, Shannon
 

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You want to anneal the cases BEFORE you form them. The whole point of annealing is to soften up the shoulder area of a 30/06 case that will be pushed down into the neck for the 7.7mm . This will make them form easier and keep them from getting a stressed area that will crack later .. mag
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Mag,

Thanks. Hmmm, never considered it from that perspective. I've always viewed annealing as the last step (before priming) in order to remove the stress from all of the previous steps that my have work hardened the brass. Your thoughts?

Shannon
 

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I anneal most cases after forming to relieve the stresses of forming. The exceptions are when I reform from one caliber to another, then I anneal first.
 

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Mag,

Thanks. Hmmm, never considered it from that perspective. I've always viewed annealing as the last step (before priming) in order to remove the stress from all of the previous steps that my have work hardened the brass. Your thoughts?

Shannon
Annealing does two different things depending what you are doing. If you are forming one case into another it should be done first . All you have to do is try it both ways. The case the has been annealed first will form much easier, less pressure is used in forming. That means the case was not worked as much, it has less chance to have a problem formed into the new case. I have formed 1000's of cases into many different ones, some very extreme. The really big changes will not even form without annealing first, the cases wrinkle, fold, or split if you do not anneal first. Those same problems will still be there , to a smaller degree, on a mild reform. That means annealing makes the case take the new form easier, and that will help even mild reforms. Annealing will also extend case neck life if you anneal cases with alot of firings on them as the necks will get harder with use. Even then the case should be annealed first, a hard necked case will not size back down correct. Annealing first will soften it first so it will size down better and more evenly. . Annealing after will not help that. mag
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Mag,

Thanks for the comments. I just spent the last hour relooking annealing, and I will now anneal before I resize or reform my brass for your above argument. However, I will submit it is not wrong or improper to make it the last step, it is just better to do it first. I will update my article as such.

Best Regards, Shannon
 

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Reforming Jap brass

Great info. Just bought a 38 (6.5) and 99 (7.7) and was rather shocked when I saw brass prices.
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Mr. Garand,

I am glad you found the info useful. I am in the process of updating my 6.5mm and 7.7mm article. However, I've completed, and attached, my revision of the .220 Swift to 6.5mm Japanese article. As you'll notice the post(s) above - not everyone agrees with using .220 Swift. I intend to get some .243 WIN and converting that to 6.5mm to broaden my reloading horizons/options.

Best Regards, Shannon
 

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Shannon, Thanks for your guide to reloading for the 6.5 and 7.7 cartridges.Have been
reloading for 15+ years and have always enjoyed it,especially when wife and I can eat up
80 rounds (4boxes) in three hours at the range with my shooter series 6 type 99.Could
never afford to do that if it weren`t for reloading.45gns 4895 /150 gn bullet for7.7 is fine
for range work,and you will get at least 7-9 firings before case life shortens,using Norma
cases.

Charlie
 

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I'm currently trying out some new loads for 8MM Nambu. Info available on the web is a bit scarce and there's few alternative powders posted. I'll be trying out my second batch using 4.8Gr of Accurate No. 2 with 84Gr copper plated bullets and CCI primers. 4.2 grains seem a bit under powered and don't cycle the gun fully. In the past I've had lots of luck with 4 grains of Bullseye. But I want to hang onto my Bullseye for .45 ACP.
 

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Dave/Ike,

I was about ready to go ballistic, but as the saying goes if you don't have anything nice say then keep thy mouth shut so I will.
:confused: I still aint figured out why yer pissed at me,I didnt say anything critical of yer durned old article,I even said it was good...I think yer even crankyer since yer back than you was befer you left (glad yer home safe and sound tho,even if yuh are cranky ;)) ..I like yer loading data and said so,so caint see why yer pissy,might be a fiber issue....Id fergot your response annoyed me till it came back to the top:mad:.
 

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All this talk of reloading got me in the mood to do just that! I have a bunch of the new graf 7.7 brass and am having trouble seating primers. Seems the pocket is not very deep and the primer barely seats flush with the head of the case? any body else having this issue? using some old CCI primers, may try some others to see if they seat better. Im going to use 44grs of IMR 3031, Does this sound like a reasonble load? Needs to be strong enuff to function my 99LMG with 150gr. com-block bullets? Using IMR 3031 because I came into a bunch of it cheap! ($10.00 a can)
 
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