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On my Inland carbine that was converted to select fire, I was told that it is a registered receiver. Where do you find or know this? Is it in the ATF records, or is the paper work different for a RDIAS?
If I wanted parts from the carbine, could I strip it down to the receiver and sell everything else? Could I simply sell the receiver and keep the rest? I don't want to sell, just curious about how all this works. You see M16 stripped lowers that are registered for sale, so you can build it to your own specs.
Thanks,
Tribrothers
 

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What part is serial numbered? The Form 4 isn't going to tell you too much by itself, but you can compare the serial number on the Form 4 with the serial number on the gun's reciever and see if they match. If they don't, start looking at the trigger frame, hammer, or selector to see if they have a serial number that matches the Form 4 (other than the reciever, those three seem to the most common registered parts from I've seen.)
 

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Could be any of the ATF-designated conversion parts (except for the spring, can't serial that) or the receiver. Bill's right, whatever the serial number on the form is will match the registered part. I'll be finding out firsthand what it's like since I just bought a reg'd rec. M2 myself.

In theory, you can replace any part except the registered one, and have spares. However, if you were to strip it and sell the registered receiver, you'd have to split up the fire control group, since ATF considers the conversion parts (without a receiver) to be a machine gun.
 

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The only way to really find out....

The only way you can really find out exactly how your MG is registered is to do a Freedom of Information Act request. What you want to ask for is any and all information on the registration and transfers of your weapon. What you will end up with likely is all transfers and the original form 2 (or form 1) that was used to register the MG. There are many M1 carbines that are registered receivers. The guys who registered them used the serial number of the receiver and usually stated on the form that this is the case. Any other type of registration would have to state how it was registered or it is assumed that the receiver is "the piece". If it is a trigger group it will say so or it will say sear, trip, selector, conversion unit etc. I've seen many of the conversions and there can be serial numbers on any or all of the parts. I'm speaking of ATF's sacred 7 which are the 7 parts they consider to be a machinegun if they are all in your possession. You will find that if the gun has been transferred from the original maker it is not always possible to find the info without the FOIA check. Transfers frequently list "US Military" or who ever is listed on the back of the receiver as the maker rather than " Joe Blows Guns" or whoever it was. There was not any sort of effort to force makers into marking the registered part either so that is not a reliable way to tell. Do an FOIA if you really want to know.....

hope that helps
Frank
 

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I'm surprised you can FOIA a Form 1 or 2, since they're supposed to be confidential tax documents. Maybe I'm misunderstanding how the process works though, would hardly be the first time...
 

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I'm surprised you can FOIA a Form 1 or 2, since they're supposed to be confidential tax documents. Maybe I'm misunderstanding how the process works though, would hardly be the first time...
You can FOIA any of that, but any kind of sensitive/personal information is redacted.
 

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You can FOIA any weapon that you personally own and is registered to you but nothing that is not registered to you. It is considered a tax form but if its your tax forms they have to give them to you. Bill is correct on the redacting of info on the forms. Since there is info on the forms that is not your own they black out all names that are not pertinent and frequently those that are as well. Form 1's were used prior to 1968 to register contraband weapons so you will find many that were registered that way. I found through the FOIA that my MG 08/15 was registered in 1951 on form 1. There were also 4467 form registrations which were amnesty forms. Basic info you get is manufacturer, date of manufacture and any transfers since then and on the original registration form it frequently states how the weapon was modified to NFA status ie- "reciever modified to accept swing down military lower receiver (G3 type) " or "auto trip sear added to lower receiver" for an M16-AR15 etc....

Hope that helps
Frank
 

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On my Inland carbine that was converted to select fire, I was told that it is a registered receiver. Where do you find or know this? Is it in the ATF records, or is the paper work different for a RDIAS?
If I wanted parts from the carbine, could I strip it down to the receiver and sell everything else? Could I simply sell the receiver and keep the rest? I don't want to sell, just curious about how all this works. You see M16 stripped lowers that are registered for sale, so you can build it to your own specs.
Thanks,
Tribrothers
The FOIA check is the best option, however, as a first pass I would look over your paper work for any comments and then check that the s/n on the paper work is the same as the receiver. If this is the case, is still not for sure as in the old days a conversion part might have been given the same s/n as the receiver etc. Next step is check the trigger housing and selector level for markings (possible just with a scribe or etcher) that match the s/n on the paper work and the manufacture (which can be Jane Doe Centerville IN) .

Gives you something to do the next time you are cleaning (and waiting on your FOIA*), however, I think nearly all the go fast parts have been used as the resisted part .... except possible the 9 spring ;-).
 

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What is the procedure to do a FOIA history check on an NFA you own?
Write a letter to the agency from whom you're requesting information. Be sure to state that you're requesting information under the terms of the FOIA. Be advised that the agency doesn't have to provide you with information for free. Searching for files, redacting sensitive information, photocopying, etc... all costs money, so be sure to include in your letter an amount that you're willing to pay. ("I will pay all fees up to $XXX.XX. Beyond that amount, please contact me ....") Finally, remember that the FOIA only applies to federal agencies (although many state and local governments have their own version of open-access laws, too.)

See here for more details:
http://www.usdoj.gov/oip/04_1.html
 
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