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Discussion Starter #1
My brother recently acquired this 1903 for $500 bucks. Actually I found the deal at our local gun shop and put money down for him. It is an original 1903 serial number is in the 19000 range. Barrel date 1909. The only drawback is someone sanded the stock otherwise she is a nice original rifle. What are the chances of finding a nice stock for her?

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Nice stocks can be found, but be prepared to pay. A two bolt stock can be found, as can a proper one bolt stock... you may wind up putting more into it than it is worth as a complete rifle.
 

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Tell us a little more about it. Isn't this one the rifle mentioned on another forum - a Rock Island with a 1919 barrel? There are ways to make the stock look a little better. If it does have a 1919 barrel, a two-bolt stock would be correct. A one-bolt stock would be a waste of time and money.

Now if anyone knows the location of a decent one bolt stock, I have this correct/original pile of RIA parts and no stock!!:mad:
 

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Discussion Starter #4 (Edited)
Nope this is a first time listing. It is a Springfield with a barrell date of 8-09. Serial number is in the 19000 range. Not sure if he actually wants to replace the stock Its just the idea of it. It really doesn't look too bad. Maybe just rub it down with some linseed oil.
 

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Northridge International recently had some 1903 stocks. You might check them out on the web to see what they still have. Nice rifle by the way.
 

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It was originally a rod-bayonet rifle, so the barrel is a replacement. Also, with that receiver number, you dont want to fire it with modern high-pressure ammo as it is poorly heat treated and could blow-up in your face. Read more on this elsewhere. Still, a nice starter and well worth taking care of.
 

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Sorry about the mistake about the listing - comes from looking at TOO many military rifle forums!

If a Springfield 1903 and not a Rock Island, The rifle probably started out as a Rod Bayonet M1903. M1903/05 in 30-03. The rifle may have been converted to a M1903/05 - The M1903/05 outwardly looked like a regular M1903 except for the caliber - or been converted to a .30-06 in the 1907-1910 era. When the .30-06 was adopted, the original barrels had to be modified and many received new barrels. There is a possibility that the 1909 barrel may be original back to when the rifle was modified to 30-06.

Two books you might want to read - both excellent:

1) C.S. Ferris' "Rock Island Rifle Model 1903." Scott A. Duff Publications: Export [PA], 2001

2) Ferris, C.S. and Beard, John. "Springfield Model 1903: Service Rifle Production and Alteration, 1905-1910"

The first book is available through Scott Duff Publications online and other sources. The second book is out of print but is still available through online used book sources.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Thanks for the info Rick. It didn't even dawn on me that it could have originally been in 30-03. I will probably pick up one of those books you listed there. And do a little research. As far as the early 1903s having weak receivers I just read an article on that. It was pretty interesting. You can check it out here. http://m1903.com/03rcvrfail/ :)
 

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I'm familiar with Dr. Lyon's work. Unfortunately, I consider it flawed. In his statistics, he uses only the rifles mentioned in General Hatcher's survey. A friend of mine found records for a number of other LN M1903s that failed, as well.
 
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