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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I just received this today and am pretty happy with what I see so far in as arrived uncleaned condition. The bore is like a mirror and doesn't look worn at all. It is all matching except the bolt is 35163 and the rest is 35165 and the band on the stock says 42 but everything else with a date shows 43. Chance this is a factory mismatch because the number is only two digits off? Here are some crappy cellphone pics.
 

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Lithgow did not repeat did not send out mismatcted rifles. The bolt was proofed to the action and has a number under the handle and on top of the actiom under the handle which is called the proof number the serial number was applied later in assembly. The action was made in 42 and the assembly to a rifle is 43. Also Lithgow used the Fiscal year i am not sure what SLAZ used could have been the calander year. Sure bet on some body jumping in with the correct info shortly.:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Lithgow did not repeat did not send out mismatcted rifles. The bolt was proofed to the action and has a number under the handle and on top of the actiom under the handle which is called the proof number the serial number was applied later in assembly. The action was made in 42 and the assembly to a rifle is 43. Also Lithgow used the Fiscal year i am not sure what SLAZ used could have been the calander year. Sure bet on some body jumping in with the correct info shortly.:thumbsup:
Number under the bolt handle is B4677 and the one on top the action is 4115 with a X above it.
Weird how close they are even if it happened sometime later though.
 

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Looks good to me but i think your bolt has been ground & renumbered, if you look at the top of the butt socket you will see a number (looks to be X4115 in your photo) this number should also be stamped on the underside of the bolt handle if its the original bolt.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Yep, it does appear to be renumbered based on the four digit code and letter suffix on the action and handle....but it's renumbered to a rifle two numbers away so even that's not correct :laugh:!
Dammit!
Did the armorers get to drink on duty?
 

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I see fiscal year has come into the discussion in rifle dates lately but I don't see how it's relative to action verse wood dates. This rifle was assembled in September 1943 or later so fiscal year or whatever would have no bearing. It's simply the lag in production from action manufacture to final assembly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
The difference in numbering style is absolutely obvious. You can also see the ground section clearly.
I didn't even notice it until you pointed it out. I literally tore the box open and eyeballed it and then took some pictures when I noticed the numbers were two off on the bolt.
These damn rifles are as bad(markings) as K98's! HaHa! :)
Aim did say in their ad when I ordered that the bolt will match(serialized) the receiver though...and it doesn't.
But this greasy little thing was in the bottom of the box under the paper packing
Not sure what it belongs to, Mosin?
 

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Shaun, I would advise if you intend to clean this rifle, the stock is about as good as they come. I only rub linseed oil into coachwood stocks no matter how dirty they appear. I won't even look at a lithgow if someone has used aggressive chemical cleaners and absorbed the color out of the wood.
If you pull if down, remove the forend first. This is critical. Do not loosen the butt screw before you have removed the forend. In fact I would suggest don't remove the butt at all unless its absolutely necessary. Once the forend is off you'll be able to inspect to draws.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Shaun, I would advise if you intend to clean this rifle, the stock is about as good as they come. I only rub linseed oil into coachwood stocks no matter how dirty they appear. I won't even look at a lithgow if someone has used aggressive chemical cleaners and absorbed the color out of the wood.
If you pull if down, remove the forend first. This is critical. Do not loosen the butt screw before you have removed the forend. In fact I would suggest don't remove the butt at all unless its absolutely necessary. Once the forend is off you'll be able to inspect to draws.
I must have read your mind, I started to wipe the stock down a little but what I used was a paper towel with a little raw linseed oil and it cleaned the loose grime off without changing the color on the area I tried it on. I'm thinking that I won't be even doing much of a cleaning on the metal besides the inner parts because I kind of like the old ( and now red )linseed oil that's in all the cracks/ crevices and along the edges where the metal and wood meet.
Also, thank you for the tip about the buttstock, I won't remove it at all but will carefully break the rest down to get the excess cosmoline out of the barrel channel and check for more markings.
 

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Shaun, I would advise if you intend to clean this rifle, the stock is about as good as they come. I only rub linseed oil into coachwood stocks no matter how dirty they appear. I won't even look at a lithgow if someone has used aggressive chemical cleaners and absorbed the color out of the wood.
If you pull if down, remove the forend first. This is critical. Do not loosen the butt screw before you have removed the forend. In fact I would suggest don't remove the butt at all unless its absolutely necessary. Once the forend is off you'll be able to inspect to draws.
+1 one on great advice. NO BLO!!......Raw Linseed Oil only. Regards, Rick.
 
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