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Discussion Starter #1
I picked one up today and am having a bit of difficulty in sorting it out. There doesn't seem to be much on these out there that I have found so far. Can anyone suggest a place where I can go to bone up on the one I have?

It's marked HEMBRUG 1916 and is a full length rifle if that matters. Really nice shape.

Thanks very much for any suggestions.
Doby
 

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There are two major variations, regular home army, and KNIL version(colonial army). Main difference is the length of the grasping grooves.
They are uncommon but not rare.
 

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I recall Sarco always seemed to have a few in the racks, going back into the '70's. but gauged by their dwell time, there wasn't much interest. Ammo was always scarce, and the attendant clips even harder to find, hence some of the lack of enthusiasm. If it wasn't for the internet, there would be zero. Keep plugging.
 

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I don't have one, so they're rare as hen's teeth. Once I buy one they'll be common as dust bunnies...
 

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from what I have seen at shows and on the internet, the long M95 rifle seems to be a bit scarce, but not rare. In good condition, they are certainly rare.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks gentlemen. This one may have been redone by the Dutch but it looks unissued frankly. I will keep looking for information on them. not much out there so probably not much interest either. I like it though so if I am stuck with it, things could be much worse.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I took some photos of the rifle this afternoon.Found a couple for sale and will see how they do to get an idea of value. It looks like it may have gone back to an arsenal for refurbishment. I don't think this one has been fired since then. The bore is mint and there are almost no handling marks in the metal. The cartouche on the side is faint. The action is interesting and the rear sight function is actually quite cool. I haven't notice sights quite like this before. There is a nice bit of fiddleback in the walnut. Overall it looks like a well made rifle.




right.jpg left action markings.jpg bolt release.jpg bolt number.jpg forearm.jpg left 3 quarter view.jpg front sight.jpg rear sight.jpg
 

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Easy round to load and shoot

You can use 6.5mm MS dies, .303 shell holder, and .303 brass to make cartridges. I use a .308 die to step the neck down in an intermediate step. Then neck anneal after you final size and trim. Load data can be the 6.5mm MS or from other sources. A great light recoil cartridge, suitable for any game in the lower 48. Your rifle will likely be very accurate as well.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thank you, MG08. the trigger is great, it looks very well made, and the bore is wonderful. should shoot well by all rights. How do you like that rear sight set up? The ratchets are unique aren't they?
 

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Discussion Starter #11
MG08, does the bolt release on your rifle have a number and if so, does that number match the rest of the rifle? Mine has one, but does not. I was wondering if that is supposed to have part of the serial number on it, or if it is just an assembly number. I am interested for obvious reasons, lol.
 

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Stock has been modified for a side sling arrangement, probably by the Germans. It appears that your bands are non-matching? This seems to be common on the German modified rifles for whatever reason. The original matching rear band may or may not have been reshaped to allow side carry as well. Rifle has been reworked (receiver is blued), probably by the Dutch.

The bolt releases were matched to the SN. Yours is 83 instead of 43, so probably a mixup by someone, German or Dutch.

If you have a K98k sling handy, see if the keeper fits in the cutout.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thank you RyanE. I saw a similar one on GB last night and sent the seller a message. His bolt release matches the receiver, but about nothing else does.

I do have a sling on a 98K and will stick it in there. rear band doesn't allow for side carry. It appears that a lot of these went back to the Dutch arsenal between the wars. The few others I have seen that are mixmasters also don't have the blued receiver and bolt. Besides the bands and the bolt release, The rest of the parts seem to match. Of course the stock may also have come from a different rifle when it was modified. I have not had it apart yet. are the stock numbered inside as well?
 

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Hello Gents,

I've had great luck shooting my Dutch M1895 Mannlichers. I bought an inexpensive set of used 6.5x55mm Swedish Mauser dies and cut the length of the full-length sizing die down, after which I used it to neck size brass for the 6.5x53mmR cartridge. Properly anneal the necks of .303 brass and run it carefully and you can get a 98% to 99% yield when downsizing the necks to 6.5mm. I used both Hornady as well as Sierra 160 grain .264" round-nose bullets in all of my WWI vintage 6.5mm loads. Both of my Dutch rifles shoot very well with my hand-loads.

M1895 Dutch Mannlicher Rifle 1R.jpg

Dutch M1895 Mannlicher Rifle 2-R.jpg

Dutch M1895 Mannlicher Rifle 3-R.jpg

M1895 Dutch Mannlicher Rifle 2-R.jpg

They are well made rifles!

Warmest regards,

JPS
 

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Discussion Starter #17
I had thought, maybe at the same time the stock was redone and cut for the sling. The workmanship doesn't look civilian to me on the metal or wood at all. The internals of the rear sight, barrel, and the other parts look like the same bluing solution and that they were done at the same time. sort of like an arsenal refurb. Though the Dutch weren't all that active as a fighting force in in WWI and WWII, they did have the Dutch East Indies, so I guess their rifles were important, lol. By the way, the only numbers that don't match are the rear band and that bolt release.


Nice rifle, sannev2!

Doby
 

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Hi samnev2,
Actually, the great majority of Dutch M95 long rifle receivers, Army, Navy and KNIL, are blued. Only during WW I, when the Dutch, fearing being drawn into the war, began the high-speed manufacturing of their 95's at Hembrug. were Army rifles made with white receivers. In a few cases, the magazine assemblies were also issued unblued and many more were blued still showing crude circular grind marks. Carbines were a different story with most receivers left in the white, even those made before WW I.
Regards,
John
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Hi samnev2,
Actually, the great majority of Dutch M95 long rifle receivers, Army, Navy and KNIL, are blued. Only during WW I, when the Dutch, fearing being drawn into the war, began the high-speed manufacturing of their 95's at Hembrug. were Army rifles made with white receivers. In a few cases, the magazine assemblies were also issued unblued and many more were blued still showing crude circular grind marks. Carbines were a different story with most receivers left in the white, even those made before WW I.
Regards,
John
So then John, from the photos you see of mine, has it been reblued? There is zero rounding of any edges and the lettering is all very sharp. I haven't taken out my jewelers loupe to look inside the numbers or letters yet. Also, do you concur on the cut out for the 98K type sling in the butt?

Thank you, Doby
 

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Amazing, It still has a cleaning rod! Does the number on the cleaning rod match, if it does then that in itself is wonderful. I've seen a couple of others with the side cut sling hole in the stock that showed similar craftsmanship to yours. They too had blued receivers. Very nice rifle.
Dan in Texas
 
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