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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Gents,

I just got my first Japanese pistol. I believe it is a series 2, Nagoya arsenal? The pistol seems to be in pretty decent shape (Compared to others I have seen), all the numbers match, including the magazine. The bore is pristine!

Any information that yo can provide me will be appreciated. Value? (I do not intend to sell, I actually want to buy more Japanese pistols now!!) I believe this are the most common Japanese pistols? Thanks again for any information.

Victor
 

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Sure is a beauty. :thumbsup: Do you think the gun has even seen any rounds through it? I don't have any 1944 Nambu's, but, just one look at yours I feel my wallet getting lighter as I type.
 

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Well it looks like your first one is a nice clean one made at the Nagoya Army Arsenal-Toriimatsu Factory and is in the 2nd series. Your next stop should be to pick up the book "Japanese Military Cartridge Handguns 1893-1945" by Harry Derby and James Brown. That will help educate you on the pistols and allow you to decide what direction you want to go with in collecting Nambus. I must tell you that Nambu collecting is highly addictive with no know treatment except a empty wallet. Also, your pistol is an example of the first full month (Feb, 1944) with the course knurling on the cocking knob. So now you can find a 19.1 with the fine knurling on the cocking knob to show that change. Then of course you would need an 18.12 date to show the change from the older style grooved type cocking knob to the solid type, as a manufacturing expedient. After that you have the grip screw change in 19.5 and grip groove to slab grip in 19.11. See where this leads? As noted yours is one of the most common found and ranks number 35 out of 35 on the rarity charts that Rampage 19 maintains. To answer you last question, not sure of your location but just based on rarity IMHO your pistols value is somewhere in the $400 to $450 value without a holster and other accessories. Again, your next stop needs to be picking up the reference material on that nice find of yours.
 

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My last Type 14 sale was a 12.? or 1937 with small trigger guard. Condition was about 92% and all numbers matched but the correct mag. It brought $600 at a large show. If you're tempted to shoot it, I'd recommend replacing the springs first due to stress and feeding problems. Avoid dry-firing due to fragile firing pins and unless you already know how, have someone walk you through disassembly for oiling. The springs are available inexpensively on the internet but modern non-corrosive ammo usually runs about $1 per round, or at least that's what I get and it sells quickly. These have a relatively light recoil but I wouldn't expect a lot of power. Congrats on a find! Nambus that early have always been scarce.
 

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"Value" tends to be relative to where you are geographically.
Where I live, I'd love to buy that gun, matched, in it's condition, at $400-450 all day long.
Nice Nambus seem to go $500-550 now, IMHO.
 

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That's why it's usually best to buy at smaller shows and sell at the larger ones. Also, once we become acquainted with discriminating, knowledgeable collectors with C&R licenses, sales slightly above market value are guaranteed. In terms of a Nambu of this early vintage and condition, demand is easily far greater than supply. I started trading these as a young Marine when the pawn shops were full of them during the early 1960's and the asking price was seldom above $15 - $20. These were sleepers for a long time and a full box of original Jap ammo frequently sold for as much as the gun. How times have changed! Good hunting.
 

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Very nice pistol and a good one to start off in collecting Japanese pistols. Your pistol is relatively common but condition, which is always important, is great. My first nambu was also a Toriimatsu factory 19 date. which I still have. As far as value, you should check the on-line auction sites and the traders forum here to see what these pistols are currently bringing. Keep in mind auctions tend to be on the higher end of the valuation scale.

The suggestion to buy a reference book like Derby & Brown is a good piece of advice. You may want to consider obtaining an early production small trigger guard T14 as your next acquisition. A lot of collectors stop after having these two basic variations and complete the rigs with holsters, extra mags, etc.. But Japanese collecting can be addictive, so study up first and always buy the best condition and matching examples that you can afford when you find them.

- tge
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Sure is a beauty. :thumbsup: Do you think the gun has even seen any rounds through it? I don't have any 1944 Nambu's, but, just one look at yours I feel my wallet getting lighter as I type.
The bore literally looks new. I doubt that it was fired much. Funny thing is I was so excited about the external condition, I did not even look at the bore until I got home!
Now, I need to findan earlier one with the small trigger guard. My wife is going to kill me.

Vic
 
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