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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I bought a DSM 34 at an estate auction last week. I don't know much about it except for what I've learned reading Internet posts. I bid on it because I thought it was a german trainer. It was part of a bunch of bring-back stuff from a veteran. There were some armbands, pennants, a canteen, a (mostly matching) byf 42 K98, and a couple of bayonets.

I paid $260 total for the trainer (also got the K98, a canteen, a bayonet and a Volksturm armband). I know I did well on the K98, but I'm not sure about the trainer's value.

As you can see from the photos, it's a 1935-dated Waffenstadt Suhl with crown B over crown U proofs. It also has "Roechlingstahl" stamped on the left side of the barrel by the receiver, as well as the 5.4mm caliber marking. (What does "Roechlingstahl" mean?)

It is not import marked. It doesn't have a rod, and the bolt/safety do not match. (They are numbered 409). However, the proofs on the bolt match. The stock also apparently does not match. It and the handguard are stamped 42 in the channels. The stock channel also had three letters stamped into it -- maybe CCG or something similar. The barrel has ASS stamped on the bottom by the receiver (no pun intended).

The letter K is carved in the left sling-slot channel of the stock; otherwise the stock has no external stampings.

The receiver and rear exposed area of the bolt have a sort of deep plum finish; the rest is blued. It doesn't appear to have been reblued, but I'm not sure. The stock does not appear to have been refinished. The bore is near excellent, and the overall blue is very good. The stock is solid and in overall fine shape.

So, here are my questions: Did I do ok on this buy? What is the rifle's approximate value? Is the plum receiver finish probably original? What might the carved K in the sling slot mean?

Thanks in advance for your replies....
 

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Others will no doubt have their opinions, but here's what I think. The price was good (was this with the buyer's premium?).
To me the receiver looks refinished. I've never seen any German guns of this era with the plum color, and the crest on the reciever looks a little washed out. The K is anyone's guess, but I'd say it's someone's initial on this side of the Atlantic.
I don't have Speed's book nearby, but this maker (actually a consortium of makers) may have been one of the lower volume makers of the DSM 34. Roechlingstahl is the type/brand of steel used in the barrel.
I just paid $450 for a very nice matching Walther DSM 34 and thought I did pretty well, and would have probably happily paid $260 for the one you got.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Others will no doubt have their opinions, but here's what I think. The price was good (was this with the buyer's premium?).
To me the receiver looks refinished. I've never seen any German guns of this era with the plum color, and the crest on the reciever looks a little washed out. The K is anyone's guess, but I'd say it's someone's initial on this side of the Atlantic.
I don't have Speed's book nearby, but this maker (actually a consortium of makers) may have been one of the lower volume makers of the DSM 34. Roechlingstahl is the type/brand of steel used in the barrel.
I just paid $450 for a very nice matching Walther DSM 34 and thought I did pretty well, and would have probably happily paid $260 for the one you got.
Thanks for the input. It was $260 out the door for the trainer. I know what you mean about the plum color and receiver, which makes one think it was refinished. However, the thing that makes me question this a bit is the condition of the rifle when I bought it. It was very dusty -- quite grimy, actually, and it had the remnants of what appeared to be an original sling hanging from the butt slot. The K98 that I bought with this trainer was in a similar condition. Each looked like it had been sitting in a closet or attic for decades. Of course, it could have been an old refinish job and then ended up in a closet for decades....
 

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Waffenstadt suhl, is the maker or 'assembler" made by a co-op of waffen house's in Suhl.
Of course you did fine on the price. M.M. bolt and stock hurt the value and the extra stock
grafitti hurt as well...It's still a nice piece.. Added, Barrel maker. Herman Roechling. Suhl
area stahl producer.. Served '7' years at age 72 after being tried at Nuernburg..He was pursicuted by the french!
 

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The plum color receiver is typical to most, but not all receivers on the Waffenstadt Suhl DSM.

The receivers were made by J.P. Sauer and likely the guns were assembled by them.

If you remover the trigger assembly you will find the Sauer "double S" logo on the bottom.

One variation of Geco DSM was also made by the same Suhl production line. Stocks will be marked in the barrel channel with C.G.H. as furnished by Haneal.

A nice piece at a fabulous price!

Good Collecting!!!!
 

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I agree with the opinions above, you did very well and got a nice gun,the action looks refinished I have the same gun and the stamp has very defined caracters=
 

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Waffenstadt suhl, is the maker or 'assembler" made by a co-op of waffen house's in Suhl.
Of course you did fine on the price. M.M. bolt and stock hurt the value and the extra stock
grafitti hurt as well...It's still a nice piece.. Added, Barrel maker. Herman Roechling. Suhl
area stahl producer.. Served '7' years at age 72 after being tried at Nuernburg..He was pursicuted by the french!
Roechling had been through it with the French after WWI as well; he saw the end coming and did some fast corporate name /management shuffling so his company survived the end of the war intact - went over to repairing locomotives.
 
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