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Sometime back I bought a M39 dated 1942 with a Sako barrel and the bore is mirror bright. But the blond stock definitely shows signs of having been used in a less than friendly environment. The dents, scratches and etc. were not sanded out but lie below some sort of finish which is not shellac.

My question is if said finish was applied by the Finns what would it likely be? It appears to be BLO or even poly done by previous owner or the importer,which was Inter Ordnance (I/O).







 

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That doesn't look natural to me. Looks to me like someone purdy'd it up at some point after import.
 

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Its our business to know this stuff....lol
 

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I'm a little confused by this,birch is a light wood and would require staining,but I was under the impression that pine tar was used as a finish at times//....Larry
No. There are no sources that would agree with that misconseption. Pine tar is just pure internet legend and misconseption that has spread. Nothing more.

Rifle stock oil was and is almost black linseed based oil. That is the stuff that was used.

There is an exeption as on Civil Guard rifles (not with SKy m/39s as those were oiled too) they used stain and laqcuer.
 

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No. There are no sources that would agree with that misconseption. Pine tar is just pure internet legend and misconseption that has spread. Nothing more.

Rifle stock oil was and is almost black linseed based oil. That is the stuff that was used.

There is an exeption as on Civil Guard rifles (not with SKy m/39s as those were oiled too) they used stain and laqcuer.
Is the use of potassium permanganate dye incorrect as well?
 

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No. There are no sources that would agree with that misconseption. Pine tar is just pure internet legend and misconseption that has spread. Nothing more.

Rifle stock oil was and is almost black linseed based oil. That is the stuff that was used.

There is an exeption as on Civil Guard rifles (not with SKy m/39s as those were oiled too) they used stain and laqcuer.
I find this hard to agree with. Since pine tar is a wood product except BLO & both a wood preservative. Both are easily mixed together even with turpentine & a dryer.
It would be hard to disprove. After long storage in a closed area the odors still are there.
Since the army had their own mix but no one offered to id the ingredients. Now you say on your own there is no such thing.
Until you come up with a proven ingredient mix for the official stock oil, just what are we to believe?
Or have we discovered the next best thing?
I am setting here with a Sako 1942 refurbished model 39 that is almost black with a finish of the army oil.
To get the depth of the finish you have to use turpentine to penetrate the wood.
 

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Well, the authentic SA-stock oil I have might be made along a different recipe than the war time one, but I would not be convinced about that. I will argue there was no pine tar involved until someone proves me wrong. Sadly I cannot prove othervise either as I have not got the recipe of the original oil. But the oil I have gives finish exactly 1:1 that can be observed on war time stocks except the 70 years patina.

Hopefully this will not be one of the discussion that never will find conclusion. Maybe we'll find the original recipe some day.
 

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Well, the authentic SA-stock oil I have might be made along a different recipe than the war time one, but I would not be convinced about that. I will argue there was no pine tar involved until someone proves me wrong. Sadly I cannot prove othervise either as I have not got the recipe of the original oil. But the oil I have gives finish exactly 1:1 that can be observed on war time stocks except the 70 years patina.

Hopefully this will not be one of the discussion that never will find conclusion. Maybe we'll find the original recipe some day.
I keep thinking of Wartime expediency, cheap plentiful and useful. I doubt if they could improve on pine tar very much. They were already using it on wood skis, with a long history on homes, ships and exterior uses. It would be a no brainer.
Did the Civil Guard members teach the old guard something?
 

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Well, it's not that Finland was short of flax either. So there was supply of linseed oil too.

But like said the SA-oil I have does produce excact match with war time stocks.
I have used dark stains in oil based stains & water based. But nothing will soak in birch wood like PT & leave it a thing of beauty. And you are right I cannot say it for sure it is PT but neither can you say it is not.
After years of finishing stocks, I can say linseed oil alone will not darken birch wood. It will walnut & Mahogany.
The ingredients would have to include PT in the Raw or boiled linseed oil.

Just maybe the Civil Guard members in their hell on Earth wanted a some beauty in their most prized possession. And I have seen some unusual beautiful stocks come out of Finland.
They sell at a high premium and usually the first to sell.
 

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After years of finishing stocks, I can say linseed oil alone will not darken birch wood. It will walnut & Mahogany.
The ingredients would have to include PT in the Raw or boiled linseed oil.
The oil is pretty much black so it has very strong stain in it. But it smells nothing like pine tar.



Just maybe the Civil Guard members in their hell on Earth wanted a some beauty in their most prized possession.

Original Civil Guard stocks were stained with ordinary dark wood stain and then lacquered. Original Civil Guard rifles have not got a drop of pine tar on them.
 

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Regarding the potassium permanganate dye, it is referenced in Terence W. Lapin's book, The Mosin-Nagant Rifle, 4th edition, page 20 under the heading of "Finnish Stocks": "Like the Russian varieties, Finnish-made stocks are of solid Arctic birch; they are oil-finished and sometimes lacquered or varnished. Some stocks made in or after the late 1930s - especially those for the M/39 - are somewhat darker because they were stained with potassium permanganate dye."
 

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Regarding the potassium permanganate dye, it is referenced in Terence W. Lapin's book, The Mosin-Nagant Rifle, 4th edition, page 20 under the heading of "Finnish Stocks": "Like the Russian varieties, Finnish-made stocks are of solid Arctic birch; they are oil-finished and sometimes lacquered or varnished. Some stocks made in or after the late 1930s - especially those for the M/39 - are somewhat darker because they were stained with potassium permanganate dye."
And there are mistakes in Lapins book, the book is for beginners.
You can get more facts here on the board among the collectors.
I have tried the potassium permanganate dye on wood and it is terrible substitute. Have you tried it?
The SA stock oil that was shown here on the board a few years back was coal black, and it was a old can of it according to the poster.
Being mixed with linseed oil I doubt if it had any odor left.
All wood products pretty well mix together, until you can point out & name the ingredients this is a waste of time.
 
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