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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a both m38 and m96 Husqvarna rifles,one of which I want to make a long range shooter but haven't decided which one yet. I purchased a BadAce no drill no tap mount and a good scope for long range but now I realize that I will never consistently hit far away targets without better trigger pull. To your knowledge does anyone like Timney or the other makers of adjustable triggers have one that is absolutely "drop in"? Both of these rifles are completely original and will stay that way, so I will not remove any wood to accommodate an after market trigger. If anyone here knows of one that is truelly drop in please help me fulfill my dream by telling me which trigger group it is.
If no such animal exists I have another question for the forum. If I were to buy another replacement trigger for whichever rifle I end up using, can a reliable gunsmith improve the pull on it to an acceptable safe level to where I can possibly hit relatively small targets at extended ranges if the rifle, scope and I all do our parts. Or at least be able to hit the narrow side of a barn.
Thanks for any help you can give me.
 

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Have not done any of this work myself but the book "
The M96 M38 M41 Swedish Mauser Performance Tuning Manual: Gunsmithing tips for modifying your Swedish Mauser rifles" describes the process of modifying the existing trigger as well as listing a number of aftermarket triggers available.
 

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A competent gunsmith with experience certainly can fine tune the Swedish Mauser trigger. Unless there is some unusual wear or damage to the trigger pivot pin, rocker or sear, all that is needed is a little bit of judicious stoning of the sear contact surface on the cocking piece. My first Swedish Mauser, a 42 Husqvarna M38, had been "improved" by bubba, who filed down one of the trigger cam humps to convert it to single stage. I wound up replacing the trigger assembly - trigger, pin and rocker - in order to restore proper 2-stage trigger action. So begin by making sure your trigger has not been monkeyed with.

Do this first: cock the action. Check the trigger pull. If you have a gauge get the pull weight. Then recock the action and apply some downward pressure with your thumb on the cocking piece. Check for any movement and try the trigger pull again. If there is a difference there is a bit too much slop in the cocking piece's fit in the bolt plug. No trigger will make any difference in this case.

BTW my 1918 CG M96 sports the BadAce Gen 2 NDT scope mount too. I recently put one on the aforementioned Husqvarna M38.
 

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Have not done any of this work myself but the book "
The M96 M38 M41 Swedish Mauser Performance Tuning Manual: Gunsmithing tips for modifying your Swedish Mauser rifles" describes the process of modifying the existing trigger as well as listing a number of aftermarket triggers available.
+1 on this recommendation. My dad has this book and used it to mod the trigger in his Kimber imported M96. At the end of the process the trigger was pretty sweet.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Have not done any of this work myself but the book "
The M96 M38 M41 Swedish Mauser Performance Tuning Manual: Gunsmithing tips for modifying your Swedish Mauser rifles" describes the process of modifying the existing trigger as well as listing a number of aftermarket triggers available.
Thank you for your input. I will try to find a copy.
A competent gunsmith with experience certainly can fine tune the Swedish Mauser trigger. Unless there is some unusual wear or damage to the trigger pivot pin, rocker or sear, all that is needed is a little bit of judicious stoning of the sear contact surface on the cocking piece. My first Swedish Mauser, a 42 Husqvarna M38, had been "improved" by bubba, who filed down one of the trigger cam humps to convert it to single stage. I wound up replacing the trigger assembly - trigger, pin and rocker - in order to restore proper 2-stage trigger action. So begin by making sure your trigger has not been monkeyed with.

Do this first: cock the action. Check the trigger pull. If you have a gauge get the pull weight. Then recock the action and apply some downward pressure with your thumb on the cocking piece. Check for any movement and try the trigger pull again. If there is a difference there is a bit too much slop in the cocking piece's fit in the bolt plug. No trigger will make any difference in this case.

BTW my 1918 CG M96 sports the BadAce Gen 2 NDT scope mount too. I recently put one on the aforementioned Husqvarna M38.
Thank you for the suggestions . I will check for play in the cocking piece before I go any further. My thoughts we're to purchase a replacement trigger assy from on of the parts places and have a gunsmith work on that so that I am not changing original parts. But this brings to mind another question. Are what I would purchase from a parts place dependable? Does anyone have experience buying a replacement trigger group and how was the experience and should I purchase housing and all? Thanks again.
 

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If you start by buying a trigger group - and there are non-issued ones available - work on that and see if you can get to where you want to be. You could do the same with the bolt assembly - again there are non-issued and issued parts available. The non-issued ones might need a little ,more work since they never been mounted in a rifle before. The surplus parts available are as good as the parts on your rifle.

These are just examples
 

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I think you will have a good chance of a simple "drop in' replacement if you install a CG trigger group in a CG receiver, and a Husqvarna assembly in an HVA. In the case of my bubba's HVA M38, I had a CG trigger assy and had to enlarge the pin hole just a little bit. The CG pin was a bit too small for the HVA receiver, and the HVA pin was a bit too big for the trigger assy. YMMV.

The picture illustrated in the post above is a CG part. Just remember that CG parts have a vertical crown stamp, and Husqvarna parts have a tilted crown.
 
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