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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm looking at doing some reloading for my Winchester 1895 chambered in 30-06 but I'm wondering where a good starting point is. I know these rifles in the 30-06 chambering are known for developing headspace issues so I would like to know what load data is being used by those who shoot them regularly. I'm thinking 30-40 Krag loads may be a good starting point but I could be way off? Any thoughts?
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Congrats on a handsome looking M '95! For some reason seems less of them in nice condition than many other vintage Win models. You found a nice one!
An 1895 Win, in '06 that chambering, my belief particularly important to check-out carefully including headspace... 'Before firing'. Not just your own loads; pushing a century of other owners. How they may have used/abused the rifle. The year of manufacture perhaps to suggest bit more too, though after 1905 or so, the reinforced breech version intro'd. That seeming most significant date concern.
The ultimate "test", determination of "condition today"! All said, I'm no Model '95 expert for sure. I have one, a takedown c.1927 with repaired buttstock wrist and just from such, red flags ascending! No way I'd have fired it without pro inspection & test fire. Such cautions frankly seller-shared & reflected in a considerably low-ball purchase price. Relevant pix below. Closeup, one stock pin visible & other at L edge of pix.
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I also have a Win 88 Carbine in 308 which - beyond any vestiges of 'vintage' - a lot safer lever gun for everyday use. That said, acknowledging, vintage as "entirely other animal". My '95 resigned to safe. You're ahead as hand-loader for sure, which I'm not!
Good luck!
Stay Safe!
John
 

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I bought a Browning/Miroku .30-06 pre tang safety a couple years ago for a nra musket build but haven‘t started on it yet except to pick up some krag stock parts that these rifles used. Hopefully it will look something like this when I’m done.
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Congrats on a handsome looking M '95! For some reason seems less of them in nice condition than many other vintage Win models. You found a nice one!
An 1895 Win, in '06 that chambering, my belief particularly important to check-out carefully including headspace... 'Before firing'. Not just your own loads; pushing a century of other owners. How they may have used/abused the rifle. The year of manufacture perhaps to suggest bit more too, though after 1905 or so, the reinforced breech version intro'd. That seeming most significant date concern.
The ultimate "test", determination of "condition today"! All said, I'm no Model '95 expert for sure. I have one, a takedown c.1927 with repaired buttstock wrist and just from such, red flags ascending! No way I'd have fired it without pro inspection & test fire. Such cautions frankly seller-shared & reflected in a considerably low-ball purchase price. Relevant pix below. Closeup, one stock pin visible & other at L edge of pix. View attachment 3785304 View attachment 3785305
I also have a Win 88 Carbine in 308 which - beyond any vestiges of 'vintage' - a lot safer lever gun for everyday use. That said, acknowledging, vintage as "entirely other animal". My '95 resigned to safe. You're ahead as hand-loader for sure, which I'm not!
Good luck!
Stay Safe!
John
John,

Thanks for the reply! Looks like you have a nice takedown example as well. Mine was manufactured in 1915. I wasn't aware that the breech was reinforced after 1905 (need to sit down and read Kassab and Dunbar's 1895 book one of these days). I did check the headspace on this rifle before I purchased it and it will not close on a field gauge so I'd be comfortable shooting it occasionally if I can come up with a suitable load for it.
 

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Tooting my horn a bit, I don't know if you noticed my profile picture is with my 1895/405 after bagging a water buck in Africa. The picture is in the Kassab/Dunbar book, also. I've collected '95's for years and have the full run of calibers but still learn something about them occasionally. Best regards, Andy M.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Tooting my horn a bit, I don't know if you noticed my profile picture is with my 1895/405 after bagging a water buck in Africa. The picture is in the Kassab/Dunbar book, also. I've collected '95's for years and have the full run of calibers but still learn something about them occasionally. Best regards, Andy M.
Thanks for the replies Andy! That's quite the accomplishment! I'd like to take my 1895 out for PA whitetail deer if possible, although I don't hunt with iron sights much anymore due to antler restrictions here. If 30-40 Krag loads are suitable that should be more than enough for deer. Any particular reason the 220gr bullets worked better for you? I was thinking of starting with 150gr or 180gr.
 

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Thanks for the replies Andy! That's quite the accomplishment! I'd like to take my 1895 out for PA whitetail deer if possible, although I don't hunt with iron sights much anymore due to antler restrictions here. If 30-40 Krag loads are suitable that should be more than enough for deer. Any particular reason the 220gr bullets worked better for you? I was thinking of starting with 150gr or 180gr.
Thanks for the replies Andy! That's quite the accomplishment! I'd like to take my 1895 out for PA whitetail deer if possible, although I don't hunt with iron sights much anymore due to antler restrictions here. If 30-40 Krag loads are suitable that should be more than enough for deer. Any particular reason the 220gr bullets worked better for you? I was thinking of starting with 150gr or 180gr.

I think the general consensus is in those days was the standard 1903 Springfield rifle twist was originally intended for a 220 gr bullet and remained that way for quite awhile, perhaps up to WW2. Don't know for sure but that's been my experience. Like I say, your mileage may vary. Maybe others have some input or experience. Maybe increased velocity will shoot 150-180 grain bullets accurately. I've always leaned towards the slow moving heavy bullet and refer to John Taylor's formula often. I've never tried factory .30-06 loads in my 1895/30-06 so can't compare.
 

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Tater,
Funny you should bring this subject up, I recently bought a '95 SRC in 30 Gov't 06 at an auction. I too was worried about the headspace issue, having read about it. So I took it to my gunsmith to check, it is Okay and he recommended Garand safe loads in it to keep the pressure down. That should be adequate for whitetail at open sight range, but I'm sure there are loads for 220 gr that can equal those pressures. I do like the 220 gr in a Krag carbine.
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Tater,
Funny you should bring this subject up, I recently bought a '95 SRC in 30 Gov't 06 at an auction. I too was worried about the headspace issue, having read about it. So I took it to my gunsmith to check, it is Okay and he recommended Garand safe loads in it to keep the pressure down. That should be adequate whitetail at open sight range, but I'm sure there are loads for 220 gr that can equal those pressures. I do like the 220 gr in a Krag carbine. View attachment 3785634
Krag in government service used 220-grin, so it was set up for that weight RN, FMJ bullet (twist rate, chamber throat, etc.) so that is the most appropriate weight for any .30 US (30-40 Krag) service Krag. Carbines, being light and with short barrels tend to recoil harder and have enhanced muzzle-blast, of course. I suspect, had we not replaced the Krag starting in 1903, we would have gone to a 175 or maybe 150 grain Spitzer service load for the Krag.

The early 30-06 was developed with a 220 and then we went to the 150 IIRC (change early in service history). Your 1895 should work well with loads that give 30-40 performance with a 220-grain RN, and such would be sudden death on whitetails.
 

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I shoot mostly 'starting' load data in mine (1916mfg). Though I have shot GI FMJ ammo in it with no harm.
It's much more accurate with the reloaded ammo!

The '95's headspace issue in 30-06 version is well known. It doesn't happen with all of them but is a concern. The issue is the breech face of the bolt is kind of thin for the higher pressured '06 cartridge comparred to the other rounds it chambered. The '06 then can sometimes push inward or better imprint it's case head into the breech face causeing the excess headspce issue.
The fix for this rifle and caliber was to bore the face of the bolt slightly oversize for the damage and insert a disc of steel. Solder in place and face off to reclaim the head space spec. Redrill for firing pin.
Locking bolt is at the rear of the bolt so no issue there. The bolt locking lugs and that area of the bolt itself are not the issue.

The rifle does much better with any jacketed reloads than with my usually accurate cast bullet ammo too, which was kind of a surprise. That cast bullet load is 12gr of Red Dot and either a 174gr or a 165gr cast GC bullet. Very accurate in my other 30-06's (Sedgley 03, N/M Sporter from the 30's and a Rem 30s Express.)

My 1895 was restocked by John Oberlies /Dayton Ohio. Marked with a deeply stamped one piece marking under the butt plate.
Oberlies was a fairly well known gunsmith in the 30's and early 40's.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
I shoot mostly 'starting' load data in mine (1916mfg). Though I have shot GI FMJ ammo in it with no harm.
It's much more accurate with the reloaded ammo!

The '95's headspace issue in 30-06 version is well known. It doesn't happen with all of them but is a concern. The issue is the breech face of the bolt is kind of thin for the higher pressured '06 cartridge comparred to the other rounds it chambered. The '06 then can sometimes push inward or better imprint it's case head into the breech face causeing the excess headspce issue.
The fix for this rifle and caliber was to bore the face of the bolt slightly oversize for the damage and insert a disc of steel. Solder in place and face off to reclaim the head space spec. Redrill for firing pin.
Locking bolt is at the rear of the bolt so no issue there. The bolt locking lugs and that area of the bolt itself are not the issue.

The rifle does much better with any jacketed reloads than with my usually accurate cast bullet ammo too, which was kind of a surprise. That cast bullet load is 12gr of Red Dot and either a 174gr or a 165gr cast GC bullet. Very accurate in my other 30-06's (Sedgley 03, N/M Sporter from the 30's and a Rem 30s Express.)

My 1895 was restocked by John Oberlies /Dayton Ohio. Marked with a deeply stamped one piece marking under the butt plate.
Oberlies was a fairly well known gunsmith in the 30's and early 40's.
Excellent explanation!
 
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