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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Realised when I was asked for the "proper military" loading procedure for the G41(W) - that I lack the experience. Yes I own an expensive example, have disassembled it several times, and played with it quite a bit. However; I lack the hands on shooting experience, and dont own a military manual for one.

From my playing - I guessing:

Either after the last round is fired, or the Bolt Carrier Handle (with bolt and carrier) is pulled back on an empty mag -

The bolt will lock back on an empty chamber.

Guessing the first step is to push the lever on the Bolt Carrier "outwards" with the right thumb. This I believe will prevent the bolt from possibly closeing after the first charger of 5-rounds is loaded.

Load and strip the first charger.

Load and strip the second charger.

Pull back on the Bolt Carrier Handle (approx 1/2-1") to release the Bolt/Bolt Carrier to feed first round into chamber.

Dont believe its necessary to touch the latch on the Bolt Carrier again.

Well - you guys that shoot them - did I get it right. Please correct me.

Times like this I wish I had some dummy 8MM Mauser rounds, and that my rifle was'nt buried in the safe.
 

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Not sure if I operate my G41 in the proper, military way, but I do shoot mine, so perhaps I can help. When you say G41(W), I am assuming you are referring to the type, not the specific manufacturer, as mine is a duv. Most of your desciption seems accurate, I'll only point out the discrepencies, as I see them. The first issue I see is that you do in fact, need to unlatch the bolt holdback on the bolt carrier if it had been latched previously. The is no automatic mechanism in place to do this for you. Secondly, latching the bolt carrier holdback is not necessary to load and operate the weapon, as the holdback feature activated by the magazine follower permits loading. Latching the bolt-carrier hold-open is merely an additional caution, which I myself usuallly follow, though I don't know what the official training would say on the matter. My guess is that the hold-open latch is really just intended for locking the bolt parts together to facilitate removal during field strip. Though you may feel sqeamish about putting fingers between parts made of hardened steel, with spring tension trying to slam them like a trap, especially considering parts may be old, sticky, worn, etc, the design is such that the magazine follower may be depressed, and the bolt will stay back....until it is pulled rearward and released. The holdback feature of the bolt-carrier latch was deemed a luxury, and was eliminated from late Walther produced weapons, after the design had evolved into the G (and ultimately K)43. If you are familiar with the SKS rifle, these work in essentially the same way, with the SKS having no hold-open feature other than what is provided by the magazine follower.
 

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I have not shot my G41 yet, but I have loaded it with 10 dummy rounds a few times on chargers. I agree with Drazil's method, although I too do not have the army manuals for it.

The bolt hold open stays in place during loading and pulling it slightly to the rear and releasing causes it to go forward.

Since I am in non-combat conditions I personally thinking locking the bolt open is a good idea, although "G41 thumb" is not a common affliction. If that is a function of the design or lack of people shooting them I dont know.
 

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When shooting these rifles you always take the chance of breaking them. One of the common areas is the front gas cone. The cone is made of two parts and the outside piece may blow/shoot off during firing. Good luck
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks guys. Broke mine out of the safe, and loaded it. Easy and just as you stated.

Too bad I wont be shooting it.
 

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Frankly, G41s are not very pleasant to shoot. It recoils much harder than you'd think, for such a heavy gun, and it's really rather ungainly...it's no wonder the troops didn't like them. As a positive, even though it's an ugly gun, the workmanship is top rate, and it's quite accurate. Mine has a weak magazine follower spring, and occasionally misfeeds...maybe someday I'll find another spring, but I can't see paying an arm and a leg for one, as the gun just doesn't do much for me, other than put the G43....a true masterpiece....in the proper context.
 

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I must second Drazil's comments. I finally shot my early production duv G41 this weekend. (I replaced the recoil springs with a set of Wolf springs earlier this year.) I can't imagine lugging that thing around in battle.

Never having shot an 8mm before, I wasn't sure what to expect but was astounded by both its report and recoil. I shot some Remington 170 gr round nose off of a sandbag rest. I had to load the shells one at a time as the magazine feed did not like the soft round nose. The recoil was as stout as my 7.62 Mosin M38. The report is staggering even with ear muffs on. The guy in the booth next to me asked me what the h*** I was shooting. I wonder if the report is a function of the gas trap system????? My Garand is several steps below what my G41 exhibits in both report and recoil. But it is amazingly accurate and smooth functioning. And an amazing piece of German engineering.
 

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I shot mine once when I got it. I replaced the recoil springs with an Apfeltor G43 kit (same springs) and fired 10 rounds of Remington commercial ammo without a hitch. Cleaned it and put it away.
I did the exact same thing with my G41(M). I shot 10 rounds of carefully loaded hand loads and put it away in the safe. Wasn't unpleasent to shoot but still on the heavy side.
 
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