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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Although I own a Model 1896 (and shoot it), I know very little about Swedish Mausers in general.

So, I have a dear friend that purchased a Husqvarna Model 1938 rifle, made in 1941. The serial number is "Belgianised/the trick with the dove", so can't be given as a reference to the collector/connoisseur to pinpoint something.

It is my conviction that a lot of 1896's (Carl Gustav Factory) were transformed into 1938's, but Husqvarna built their own 1938's from new on. Let me explain please: When I see "Husqvarna 1941" stamped on the receiver, this means for me that this rifle never was a Model 1896 and would have been reworked.

I hope this personal view is clear for all ... and hoping that I'm right. May I ask to correct me when I'm seeing this all wrong?
Thank you! Greetings from Flanders fields.
 

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Not sure I understand your statement . HVA built new from scratch M38 rifles dated 1941/1944 , starting with serial number 600,000 . Before that , about 55,xxx CG & Mauser M96's were converted to M38's ( random serial numbers ) . HVA also built about 17,xxx M96 rifles from scratch for the FSR .

Another fact , we see spare HVA receivers used for M96 replacement receivers , numbered to match the original serial number . So , these would be under the 600,xxx serial range .
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you Swede for your concern. The problem is that this Husqvarna has had it's serial number changed. I will explain. The Model 1896 was (at one moment, in fact for several years) free to own in my country and considered as a "Historical, folkloristic or decorative weapon", this was arranged by law. If you wanted to shoot it, you needed a permit (otherwise no ammo could be bought in a store and it was illegal to shoot it ).
What happened? Some (a lot?) owners that had a permit for a model 1896 were able to purchase a model 1938 via, via and gave them the same serial number as on their 1896. So they could shoot, without any worry, with their 1938 because the number on their 1896 permit was the same as on the 1938 model. That's what I meant with "the trick with the dove". They knew, just as your servant, that the average controller had no clue about any difference between "a short or a long Swedish Mauser". They simply had/have no idea.
My question is, IMHO, rather simple ... did the Husqvarna factory change the stamps/inscriptions on certain "Carl Gustav, Factory made 1896 rifles"?
I do not know but assumed they never did. If I see "Husqvarna 1941" on a receiver of a 1938 model ... could this rifle ever been made out of parts of a model 1896? I've seen the rifle in question at an extremely close distance and realy think the receiver never was stamped at "Carl Gustav" and changed later on.
I may see this the wrong way, I don't know. Just seeking what this instrument was born as. The original serial number on the rifle is lost for always ... I've seen the original number some 30 years ago but that wasn't important at that moment ... it was important that the owner could shoot it under "an official number". I don't have to make a drawing, do I? Don't take anything here wrong please ... it's just a question about what Husqvarna made/changed or whatever. Hu, the rifle shoots like a gem:)
 

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HVA made 17,xxx M96's with 1943 or 1944 dated receivers . They are legit .

HVA did not alter Carl Gustaf logos or numbers .

HVA receivers were used to rebuild some CG & Mauser M96's ( replacement receivers , all other useable CG or Mauser parts were retained ) . In that case , you will have a HVA receiver with a CG or Mauser serial number below 600,000 .
 
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