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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
This auction just started, and I recognize the seller name. Any of the sword collectors on here can just google MASATSUGU SIGNED, HIGH RANK GENDAITO, RARE NCO


I dont believe for a minute that this set up is legit. The sword parts are real, but cobbled together.

For the Type 95 latch assembly, he uses a "new" small piece of coil spring, which was not used on that design. They used flat tension springs for the latch assembly.

Not to mention the large newly drilled hole in the lower tang.

The tsuka (aluminum handle) has had its bolt hole filled with some sort of substance to help cover it up.


Hard to believe that people actually buy this sh....!
 

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Sadly people like myself who aren’t knowledgable about the swords would probably think they are getting a deal not realizing the lengths the seller went through to disguise it. Probably say that it was “arsenal refinished” during the war to cover his tracks.
 

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I agree all the parts, and blade, are WWII legit. Good catch on the filled hole. The white paint in the diamonds all looks new. And the coil spring is not right, like you say. His description is filled with bogus stuff like "paratrooper gunto", and "The mountings are a very rare and high end Type 95 Shin Gunto" - they are quite common, standard Type 95 fittings!

I too, think the end hole in the nakago is new looking.

If the date were late 1930's, I'd be tempted to accept this as something made for an officer during the sword shortages, but 1945?

I hate seeing stuff like this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I agree all the parts, and blade, are WWII legit. Good catch on the filled hole. The white paint in the diamonds all looks new. And the coil spring is not right, like you say. His description is filled with bogus stuff like "paratrooper gunto", and "The mountings are a very rare and high end Type 95 Shin Gunto" - they are quite common, standard Type 95 fittings!

I too, think the end hole in the nakago is new looking.

If the date were late 1930's, I'd be tempted to accept this as something made for an officer during the sword shortages, but 1945?

I hate seeing stuff like this.


Here is the info copied from his Terms/Conditions.


Terms and additional items: This item is original and not a knockoff or fake. The analysis regarding swordsmith listed above is my own and while I think I am accurate, I can not guarantee that aspect as I am not an expert from NBTHK. No reserve so please bid with confidence and let me know if you have questions. I can send additional detailed photos upon request. Payment is to be made within 7 days of auctions end. If payment is not received in 7 days we will re-list the item and file a non-paying claim with ebay. Bidders must be 18 years of age or older. We reserve the right to cancel unwelcome bids. This item is not for sale where prohibited. Please review the pictures closely and ask any questions before end of auction. More pictures are available and discounts after the auction closes are not supported or allowed. Bidder pays the shipping and insurance fees for USPS Priority within the U.S. and Express Mail International outside the U.S. Virginia residents are subject to 5.3% sales tax.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Sadly people like myself who aren’t knowledgable about the swords would probably think they are getting a deal not realizing the lengths the seller went through to disguise it. Probably say that it was “arsenal refinished” during the war to cover his tracks.


If you look closely, the tip of the blade is busted off.



Sword bid is up to 1500.00 as of now.
 

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An update - the seller is a member at NMB and has openly discussed this with us on this thread:


He shows a similar one from the Plimton collection that supports his as possibly WWII era-made. It was Plimpton who used the "paratrooper" label. I'm researching that topic over on Warrelics here:

I am aware of the Navy Landing Forces from Austin Adachi's excellent book "Rikusentai" but don't recall reading/hearing anything about Army paratroops. Like the famed "Tanker/Pilot Sword", I think the label is something generated by collector speculation about swords that aren't standard. But this one in question is something of a mystery that likely will never be solved for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited by Moderator)
An update - the seller is a member at NMB and has openly discussed this with us on this thread:


He shows a similar one from the Plimton collection that supports his as possibly WWII era-made. It was Plimpton who used the "paratrooper" label. I'm researching that topic over on Warrelics here:

I am aware of the Navy Landing Forces from Austin Adachi's excellent book "Rikusentai" but don't recall reading/hearing anything about Army paratroops. Like the famed "Tanker/Pilot Sword", I think the label is something generated by collector speculation about swords that aren't standard. But this one in question is something of a mystery that likely will never be solved for sure.

Bruce,

I've read through that thread. And even over there, there are members casting their doubt, and the seller is VERY defensive on his "questionable sword" .



Since he sells so many WWII era Japanese swords on ebay, he should be knowledgeable enough to mention that the tip of the blade is busted off, and that the coil spring is NOT original nor correct. But he does NOT mention that information in his listing. Which leads me to believe he is a dishonest seller.



At the end of the day, somebody is going end up with this LEMON.
 

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The smith is Ki Masatsugu. The date is April 1945. The tsuba shows 東 Tokyo arsenal inspection; 社 a civilian company made it.

Condition. The blade is in fair condition. The smith is a high ranking name.

A blade made in April 1945; bought by an NCO? When the new owner had it, the War would end in three months. The wear and tear on the blade had to be from the cutting test in the post-war era.

It's not an issued sword.
 

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The value. The smith is a big name. The catch is to bring out the full value, you need to give it a new polish. $2,000+ expense there.

If you know how to polish a Japanese sword properly DIY, it may work for you. Buy it; polish it; and put it in a shirasaya.
 

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Yes, the fitment issues. I think with the habaki, the blade won't seat in the scabbard. The NCO blade is thinner/smaller than the regular Type 98's. If come from factory, they would make work. But it's not.
 

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The plot thickens boys!!! Check the latest posts on that NMB thread. Drb1643 has posted another near-identical Masatsugu blade in Type 95 fittings! With a Yoshitsugu already on file (Type 95 tsuka, but wooden saya made for leather cover) that makes 3 like this. The evidence is starting to tilt toward legit, late war gunto fitted with available parts.
 

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That new sword does not have a Habaki, either. What does that tell you? They forgot to put it on? The US bombing caused "supply chain problems". "We will send you a Habaki as soon as it's available". "Domo Arigado".

No. Without a Habaki, the sword is incomplete. You can't sell/send it to your buyer. On the other hand, any buyer who's sophisticate enough to order a custom blade, won't accept a sword without a Habaki.

In conclusion, these are clearly post-war parts swords. Nice parts and worth the sum of parts.
 

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If you use a NCO scabbard, the Type 98 blade with a Habaki won't fit the throat. The Kyo-gunto scabbard or a Type 3 scabbard will work.

On a truly custom ordered sword, everything will fit like a glove. After all, a custom job is a custom job. But, these Type 98 blades were not intended for the NCO scabbard.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
If you use a NCO scabbard, the Type 98 blade with a Habaki won't fit the throat. The Kyo-gunto scabbard or a Type 3 scabbard will work.

On a truly custom ordered sword, everything will fit like a glove. After all, a custom job is a custom job. But, these Type 98 blades were not intended for the NCO scabbard.

I agree 100% on this.

No Japanese sword smith taking pride in his work, would allow his blade to leave without a habaki fitted to it.

Hell, I even dug into my collection of photos of non Japanese made "island swords" and all of those have habaki's on them.


These NCO/Gendaito blade swords, seem to fall into the same category of the so called "Late War" Navy Gunto that are deemed post war assembled. You have some folks on either side of the isle claiming war time/post war production.



On a side note, I've noticed that other members on this forum (who are sword collectors) have remained silent on this thread????
 

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You very well may be right. No way to know, really. Enjoying the discussion though. I think your last post would account for the lack of habaki, though. If 95 fittings were all this shop had, and knowing the officer habaki would not fit into the 95 saya ..... then don't use the habaki, right?! Additionally, by not using the habaki, this would make the nakago extend enough to put the second ana.
I also find it hard to believe, not impossible but hard, that this post-war faker happened upon 2 Masatsugu - made in the same month/year - for his fakery. How many Masatsugu have you come across lately?

Now on your side of the coin, after looking at my files on the Yoshitsugu, it does have a habaki and is mounted in a wooden saya. Not hard to explain - the Yoshitsugu was fitted by another shop, another location.
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