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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't know if these posts help anyone, but am just passing information along. Observations on the new acquisition:

1. This rifle is a lot looser than the Mark IV. Some of it due to its age and some due to screws not being tight. This example was a lot cleaner than the IV though I wish IMA was not so aggressive with the wire wheels; I hope they're using brass wheels.
2.Stock in better condition as noted before; more pitting on the barrel; and the trigger group was kind of loose in the receiver.

I spent the weekend taking the thing down to bits, starting with cleaning the bore by filling with simple green and letting it soak overnight then cleaning like a regular rifle.

All the small bits went into the ultrasonic clearer and the furniture was scrubbed with simple green and Murphy's oil soap, then rubbed with gunny paste, and buffed. They could use a little more work.

I decided to make a brass shim to tighten up the side of the trigger group. I think it is about .005" thick and is held in place by the cocking level bolt and forward screw.

I also tightened up the middle barrel band with more shim stock so it does not have to be screwed in fully to stay tight. I also added some very thin shim stock around the rear and forward fore stock pins so they stay in place.

Other than the above, I used some light grease on the moving parts and put it back together. Finally, I fired the striker a few times after reassembly to make sure it was still hitting the spent primer cap.

As Douglas pointed out, I found a serial number on the bottom of the barrel, N4821; shouldn't the prefix be an E for Enfield? There was another number "863" which was also stamped in two places in the same area. This rifle has more proof marks than the IV. There are also some strange hash marks in the same area. Anyone seen these before?

The lever locking cup on the Mark IV started functioning after cleaning, but it was brass. The Mark II cup and lock is made from steel. Has anyone had any luck freeing these up?

Finally, has anyone tried tracing the lineage of these rifles back to a particular unit? Would be interesting to try.

Curtmr4
 

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The shims. Not needed. May cause problems down the road.

The trigger group shim. If I understand what you have is placed a shim between the wall of the action and the trigger guard. This will move the trigger group to one side and may cause either drag or binding of the sear goose neck in the striker slot and a harder trigger pull. The trigger group doesn't to be tight. Leave that shim out. When cocked the action will be tight, fired the action will be loose. THe lever my even droop, that is normal if the lever is loose after firing.

The lever cup may not seem to be functioning. Adjust the lever tension so the end of the lever catches on the lever cup hook. This adjustment is made by lightly tapping the end of the lever rearward with a plastic mallet. Light taps keep checking until you get the correct tension and the lever end is held in the cup. If you use a metal hammer or strike the lever end to hard you break the end of the lever right off.

The shim stock on the middle band. First the band screw. The band screw has a tapered head. This taper is the to keep the screw tight, so as to not back out. Be sure to clean the screw head recess in the band well with solvent and a toothpick and get all the debris out. While the British Soldier was not allowed to do it, it is not uncommon for find a piece of card stock laying in the bottom of the barrel channel in the stock under the barrel at the band location. This pushed the barrel up into the top of the band. Tightening the stock screw pulled everything down tight. But in order for that taper head screw to work, the screw must be tight.

I suggest you order the INSTRUCTIONS FOR ARMOURERS - MARTINI-HENRY: Instructions for Care and Repair of Martini Enfield from Amazon. I seldom recommend buy from Amazon, but in this case it is the best source.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
The shims. Not needed. May cause problems down the road.

The trigger group shim. If I understand what you have is placed a shim between the wall of the action and the trigger guard. This will move the trigger group to one side and may cause either drag or binding of the sear goose neck in the striker slot and a harder trigger pull. The trigger group doesn't to be tight. Leave that shim out. When cocked the action will be tight, fired the action will be loose. THe lever my even droop, that is normal if the lever is loose after firing.

The lever cup may not seem to be functioning. Adjust the lever tension so the end of the lever catches on the lever cup hook. This adjustment is made by lightly tapping the end of the lever rearward with a plastic mallet. Light taps keep checking until you get the correct tension and the lever end is held in the cup. If you use a metal hammer or strike the lever end to hard you break the end of the lever right off.

The shim stock on the middle band. First the band screw. The band screw has a tapered head. This taper is the to keep the screw tight, so as to not back out. Be sure to clean the screw head recess in the band well with solvent and a toothpick and get all the debris out. While the British Soldier was not allowed to do it, it is not uncommon for find a piece of card stock laying in the bottom of the barrel channel in the stock under the barrel at the band location. This pushed the barrel up into the top of the band. Tightening the stock screw pulled everything down tight. But in order for that taper head screw to work, the screw must be tight.

I suggest you order the INSTRUCTIONS FOR ARMOURERS - MARTINI-HENRY: Instructions for Care and Repair of Martini Enfield from Amazon. I seldom recommend buy from Amazon, but in this case it is the best source.
Douglas: I will look for that book and rethink the shim stock in the trigger group. I guess it bothered me that it was so loose. I could always put thinner material on both sides to keep it centered as I was concerned about it shifting slightly to one side as well (we are talking very minute adjustments). It was actually loose in two dimensions - side to side and up and down, as though the cocking indicator and forward bolt were slightly undersized or the holes were enlarged.

On the middle barrel band, I simply coiled some thin brass stock inside of the band so it does not have to be cranked down so hard to stay tight. The front one is OK and I will probably loosen that one a little to make the cleaning rod go in and out easier.

The lever cup hook appears to be rusted into place and I have been unable to move it. I don't want to bang on it too much of course. Shame it was not made out of brass like the Mark IV.

Thanks for the advice; it is much appreciated.
 

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Douglas: I will look for that book and rethink the shim stock in the trigger group. I guess it bothered me that it was so loose. I could always put thinner material on both sides to keep it centered as I was concerned about it shifting slightly to one side as well (we are talking very minute adjustments). It was actually loose in two dimensions - side to side and up and down, as though the cocking indicator and forward bolt were slightly undersized or the holes were enlarged.

On the middle barrel band, I simply coiled some thin brass stock inside of the band so it does not have to be cranked down so hard to stay tight. The front one is OK and I will probably loosen that one a little to make the cleaning rod go in and out easier.

The lever cup hook appears to be rusted into place and I have been unable to move it. I don't want to bang on it too much of course. Shame it was not made out of brass like the Mark IV.

Thanks for the advice; it is much appreciated.
Brass shim stock has its place, but for many applications , I prefer to de-grease the mating surfaces and, using a narrow artist's sable brush, apply a coat of spar varnish. Often that is enough to remove the wiggle, and it will last through several disassemblies without appreciable loss.

Do each side and let the varnish dry thoroughly, then try it for fit. You can always add more. The beauty is that it's easily adjustable, doesn't show or fall out, like shims often do, is not permanent and is readily removed with acetone.

This technique came to mind after seeing many military surplus auto pistols that were literally frozen solid by nothing more than dried oil.

As for the non-functional lever hook cup, an old trick learned from disassembling hydraulic value lifters from an auto engine: use compressed air. Stick the nozzle of an air gun with 90 psi into the socket of the cup and hold a rag tightly over it to concentrate the air blast into the tiny crevices under the cup; often this will pop the cup upward slightly out of the inletting, a position from which it can eventually be jiggled and worked loose. Be careful not to splinter out the surrounding wood.

M
 

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Big fault with Martinis ,wear in the pivot holes cant be fixed......(it was fixed by a new reciever body,but Im assuming you dont have one at hand)...........I find the easiest way to fix loose guard assys is selectively fitting from my collection of bits .........The only MH s I have with tight fit are Mk IVs ,presumably because they havent been fired........You can also carefully squeeze in the sides of the body to grip the guard (carefully)
 

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The lever hook cup is secured in place with a through pin,so dont go trying to remove it ,youll bust the wood..........simple way to adjust the lever hold......place the lever on a flat hardwood block,and give the loop a light blow with a lead hammer .....this will lengthen it ......to shorten ,tap the back of the loop......Fit is important ,the lever should not be tight in the socket,or pressure is put on the pivot axle ,and wear is the result.......the lever should click shut,be retained ,but not tight.
 

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Sorry, I did neglect to state the obvious, that there is a cross-pin in the stock that must first drifted out before the lever socket can be removed.

The reason why the socket often needs to be removed is because the tiny claw inside it that serves as a latch for the rear tip of the lever is frozen, clogged with old grease, rust, and debris; there's no other way to properly clean it out.

M
 

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I have only ever seen one of these lever cups that ever need removed. That one had the hook broken off. All others were corrected by adjusting the lever as described in the Instructions for Armourers, by tapping the end of the lever with a mallet.

The rule of thumb in antiques rifles is to never remove nails except to repair or replace broken parts.. Nails are pins that are driven in to wood with force and and held in place by the interference fit of the wood. They should not be removed for cleaning or maintenance .The lever cup pin is a nail. The pin in stock wood in front of sling swivels are nails. The cross pin hold the Martini is a that a in and can be driven out.

These nail because of there interference fit from corrosion over time will tear the wood when driven out.

To loosen the hook on a lever cup linseed oil the stock and work the lever in and out to loosen tension. But do not take it out
 

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I can't quarrel with the rule of thumb to avoid disassembly if possible. It's a good rule. On the other hand, of the three M-H rifles from Nepal that I have worked on, all three had socket hooks that were hopelessly jammed and had to be removed to clear them. Adjusting the lever by tapping on with a mallet can have no effect on engagement with a hook that doesn't work.

Just my experience; YMMD.

M
 

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Well Socket hook? Assuming you mean lever catch assembly.

I have a lot more experience (a lot more) than just 3 rifles and only seen the one broken catch. And I have never seen one yet that couldn't be fixed by adjusting- tapping the lever end. Takes practice and a touch of persistence. The hook is a protrusion on the edge of a round snap spring and movement is barely perceptible-.It should be very difficult to move by pushing in it. the spring act by the protrusion pushing and twist the fl spring, very hard. Wipe some linseed oil on the hook and work the lever few time to break up any debris that might be binding thing

This lack of latching the lever end is a very common, the high tension and friction cause a lot of wear..

The broken one is the only one I have ever seen that needed removal for repair.

Do look in the Martin Henry Armorers it has instructions how do adjust the lever. Skennerton and Apinshaw both have reprinted the Manual in their books.
 
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