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If it's Cast Iron; pretend it's a Dutch Oven.
Lightly scrub off surface Rust with Soap & Hot Water, dry in a warm oven, then get it hot in the oven & coat lightly with Paraffin Wax.
Many a wife in the south would cover you with boiling rice/grits for fouling their oven with that method. Now, if you have a self cleaning oven and your dealing with solid shot, there would be no need for Parafin.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Many a wife in the south would cover you with boiling rice/grits for fouling their oven with that method. Now, if you have a self cleaning oven and your dealing with solid shot, there would be no need for Parafin.
That is only if she finds out what I have done to the oven! Of course the last time i fooled with the kitchen was when I was soaking gun parts in oil, ……. In her cooking pots! As they say “that did not end well”!
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Ok you chaps have developed one hell of a weight loss program. Sent the wife a text saying “Ok, so the guys on gun boards say to cook the solid shot cannonballs in the oven. When is the best time?”

I am now 10 inches shorter because she just ripped my head off and need cushions on the chairs because I have no ass left!

Thanks!,
 

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Lost me at that curve?
I have seen a lot of old tools that were BLO treated. And forged beat traps. Real collector iron that have had much value lost with that old crap coating. it is OK for coating junk that has no value now and never will be worth anything in the future. BLO is not for objects of any merit. There was another treatment with some rust converter that could be painted on. Similar look, more damaging than BLO.

The most difficult thing for many to do it is "LEAVE OLD STUFF ALONE" . Just becasue it is "not a gun" should not open up the floodgates of bubba-restoration options.
 

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I have seen a lot of old tools that were BLO treated. And forged beat traps. Real collector iron that have had much value lost with that old crap coating. it is OK for coating junk that has no value now and never will be worth anything in the future. BLO is not for objects of any merit. There was another treatment with some rust converter that could be painted on. Similar look, more damaging than BLO.

The most difficult thing for many to do it is "LEAVE OLD STUFF ALONE" . Just becasue it is "not a gun" should not open up the floodgates of bubba-restoration options.
Find myself disagreeing. BLO may not be the best possible treatment for metal objects, but it is what Fabrique Nationale d'Armes de Guerre used on the stock of my Superposed - and that is surely an object of merit...

I am unwilling to oven-roast (or otherwise subject to heat) projectiles UNLESS i am certain they aren't explosive-loaded.
 

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Agreed. BLO is wonderful, good and proper for wood. It was the original finish on many rifles and very nice in that it can be reapplied without running a risk of getting called a refinish or a restoration.

My Belgium Browning shotgun came with a very glossy hard finish that really did not appeal to me. Had they used BLO, I expect, I would have been happy. Eventually, l stripped it off and hand rubber on an oil. Probably killed the resale. Anyone lives long enough, he will regret some improvements made to his guns. Then they call us Bubba :) I guess that makes me a reformed bubba.
 

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That is only if she finds out what I have done to the oven! Of course the last time i fooled with the kitchen was when I was soaking gun parts in oil, ……. In her cooking pots! As they say “that did not end well”!
Trust me, if that parafin wax ignites, resulting in sooty smoke and waxy smell SHE WILL KNOW, no matter how hard you try to air out and clean the kitchen.
 

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Agreed. BLO is wonderful, good and proper for wood. It was the original finish on many rifles and very nice in that it can be reapplied without running a risk of getting called a refinish or a restoration.

My Belgium Browning shotgun came with a very glossy hard finish that really did not appeal to me. Had they used BLO, I expect, I would have been happy. Eventually, l stripped it off and hand rubber on an oil. Probably killed the resale. Anyone lives long enough, he will regret some improvements made to his guns. Then they call us Bubba :) I guess that makes me a reformed bubba.
Probably French Polished, which is hard, shiny, and uses BLO and a LOT of rubbing with real thin coats.

Oh - apparently USN, in the days of wooden ships, iron men and cannon balls propelled by sacred black from muzzle-loading guns (and carronades...), used shiny black paint to preserve cannon balls. And the guns themselves. Oil-based paint, not sure of the pigment
 
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