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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I don't reload and don't know much about it so be nice with responses to my questions:

Does using the "wrong" powder type cause an unsafe condition in bolt action rifles? For example, if you don't have 5010 for .50 BMG but use something normally used for 7.62x51 (in a bolt action only) then does it really matter?

I'd guess that a powder that burns too quickly could cause overpressure, but would that matter in a bolt gun?

Where does one get the burn rate for powders and the range of burn rates that are OK for a particular weapon design?
 

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Powder burn rates are just general terms (fast, slow, medium). The burn rate does not tell you what pressure you will generate with a given load. Stick to the recipies in the reloading manuals. To do otherwise is just plain foolish and extremely dangerous.
 

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you really don't want to experiment with your face near explosions..... especially with a high capacity case. good advice is to buy a couple of manuals. do it right or you won't do it for long.
 

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If you don't know why it does not matter if a firearm is bolt action or not when it comes to powder speed as factor in the weight and inertia of the projectile then do not even attempt to reload.

I'll be kind to you, if and only if, you promise to never play with reloading or reloading equipment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
If you don't know why it does not matter if a firearm is bolt action or not when it comes to powder speed as factor in the weight and inertia of the projectile then do not even attempt to reload.

I'll be kind to you, if and only if, you promise to never play with reloading or reloading equipment.
you are an ass. your comments tend to discourage someone from asking a legitimate question. I do know that rate of burn affects pressure build up in certain sections of the barrel which would directionally cause semi autos to not cycle properly. there are obviously additional detrimental consequences but semi autos would be more sensitive than bolt guns based on this comment.

I lurk on the preparedness board and now know why you have your reputation. why be an ass when I begin with my disclaimer and ask a legitimate question. hopefully others can learn by your mistake.
 

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C&R.. whatever you think of me is fine... but you still seem to miss the point.. bolt or semi doesn't matter.. small differences in powder load may affect a semi's reliable function or cycling or wear and tear on the system... but using an ultra slow super magnum powder like 5010 in place of the powders normally used in a medium capacity medium velocity round like the 7.62x51 is asking for an explosion in any action if you use just a smidgen to much and really bad performance low velocity if you use too little with almost no safety margin in between. Different makes and models of rifles have different pressure limits as designed by the designers regardless of being bolt or semi.. although rifles firing the same cartridge tend to be designed to the same pressure and the same pressure curve regardless if they are bolt or semi or break action.. the type of action is not a deciding factor in designing the maximum safe pressure.
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I may be an ass as you say.. but I'm an ass trying to prevent you from harming yourself, or your friend or whoever from harming themselves because you hold the misguided opinion that bolt or semi matters in the ability of the chamber to handle overpressures and asking about a class of powder fully capable of rupturing the chamber of any rifle designed for 7.62 x 51 with just the slightest miscalculation.. there is a reason that reloading manuals do not cover that powder /caliber combination.. I know 5010 draw down bulk is cheap and I know the temptation to try and economize.

Call me anything you want.. just don't try it ...and understand the difference between pressure curve insude the barrel and powder restrictions and bullet weight limits that are designed to insure proper functioning of a semi that do not affect safety margins and are inconsequntial in a bolt action and a complete mismatch of a powder to a cartridge that can rupture a chamber.

This is how it will go.. because you are using an exceptionally slow powder ( thats is half the price of a proper powder and commonly available in 8 LB jugs) you start by working up and you start with a very small load.. hopefully small enough to just give you a very unsatifactory low velocity bullet.. that tempts you to up the load to get a better performing faster bullet somewhere close to a factory load's velocity... but well before you get to even half way acceptable velocities you exceed chamber pressure limits and rupture the rifle and possibly injure or kill yourself.. just don't do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
...I may be an ass as you say.. but I'm an ass trying to prevent you from harming yourself, or your friend or whoever...
It is not your intention but method that sucks. In the world of contructive or destructive criticism, you unwittingly chose the latter. You need to change your wording if you really want to help someone. I'm not a Psychologist but unsolicited belittling of someone speaks volumes about your real intentions (...to make yourself feel important, or whatever).

If you can't tell, then "yes", your superior attitude did piss me off. Too bad you don't realize that we all started with a blank slate and had to learn to get to where we all are. It makes no sense to belittle someone for something that they haven't learned yet. Ignorance and stupidity are not the same thing.

JJJ--thanks for the comment. I didn't realize that there was a reloading forum.
 

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Solid points from everyone involved in this thread! First and foremost safety is key!! Never attempt anything w/o having some time and/or experience with reloading something new. Manuals are a must but nowadays most all can be referenced online or places like this one. There are always questions to be asked. Thats called learning!!! Lets face it folks now more than ever our knowledge of firearms and related garb is dwindling, and we must pass on what knowledge new folks have and need. I get tired of seeing and hearing of our misguided youth joining the military with out ANY knowledge of Firearms whatsoever! A gun is a tool ( my opinion) not a weapon! To use a tool properly one must know ALL the ins and outs of how and WHY it works. Common rule, military auto action throats are always sloppy due to variaces in conditions. Bolts and on up through customs will get tighter and tighter thus creating a whole new beast, which matters greatly when talking pressure. I've noticed most folks on here are pretty cocky, and Im not downing anyone. Creative, constuctive info is why we all are drawn to something in common. Keep this in mind.
 

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No flames, just a recommendation

Discovery Learning with explosives is a painful experience. Gun powder is an explosive and thats why a good reloading book will answer your questions and keep you safely reloading and shooting your weapons.

The best investment you can make after getting the book is a high quality scale and learn to use it. Speed is not the issue of reloading: precision and accuracy is. You obtain those results by careful attention to detail.

It costs as much to reload a good round as a sloppy inaccurate round.

Nothing should waive safety. Some of the emotion you see in the answers reflects shock and awe from experienced reloaders. The do not mean to be hateful or disrespectful.

We all got to remember we all started reloading with no experience and be open to helping other shooters into this rewarding hobby.

If you live in Va. I would be glad to help you by showing you the basic ropes of reloading.

I will close by saying: Usually it's not cost effective to buy surplus powders as they are not consistent with factory civilian versions. Trying to experiment with them is not a good idea. THe math is this: You will pay 3 cents for a primer, brass is maybe say 15 cents a case or more, a bullet is nearly 22 cents and why waste all of that on a mystery powder that might save you 5 cents a shot? Or it might cost you your eyesight? I bought 10 pounds of European 4895 at 85 dollars a can and I wasted a lot of bullets trying to get the load development where I wanted it. In time and bullets and primers: I could have used IMR 4895 and just saved me the nonsense.
 

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yep, i started with a blank slate also, but first thing i did was go buy a speer and a hodgons reload manual. they start AT THE BEGINNING, give ample warnings, and go from there. buy the book...... best advice i can give.
 

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C&R,
Add me to the list of people who highly encourage you to reference reloading manuals.

I use only handloading manuals and data online at the powder manufacturer websites.

When someone online posts a favorite load that they have in a firearm, I double-check my manual to make sure it falls within their data.

Check with local gunshops and gun ranges to see if any classes on handloading are being offered.

I was fortunate that I got into handloading about 26 years ago when I was only 20 years old, and learned on a very basic RCBS "O" frame press.

I've since graduated to a couple of progressive loaders.
 

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There's been several people on here mention the same advice.
If you are sincere about learning you should take the advice.
Acquire manuals, read manuals, re-visit info in manuals as reloading.

And besides that, all the best reloading secrets are in the manual also.

OF
 

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+1 on the advise......one note I'd like to make (pretty anal I guess) gunpowder is NOT an explosive, it is a combustable solid...."dry gasoline" if you will. Gunpowder doesn't explode.....it ignites. Trinitrotoluene explodes.
 

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I got into reloading by asking an experienced handloader buddy to demonstrate how it is done. We spent a couple of hours going thu thru the processes from initial case prep (the most time consuming series of steps) thru final bullet seating and crimping, and the experience really put me at ease and built up my confidence in working up safe and accurate loads.

At the risk of being redundant, read the manuals. I have several, but the Lyman's manual is my favorite.

Hope this helps. :D

Tennboy
 
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