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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm thinking about buying a Hex laminate stock purchase from Classic Arms which has excellent customer service. How well do most Hex laminates shoot? Is their any potential collector value longer term? I am not sure what to expect condition wise given recent reviews i.e. Percentage Counter bore, whether force matched, accuracy and rifle parts fit? Would love to hear your responses.
 

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This will be a rifle refurbished by the Soviets. Virtually all refurbs have force matched non-original parts (ground or lined out and restamped or EPd). On a refurb, a laminate stock is correct. How well it shoots depends on bore condition and less on how much counterbore or being a hex receiver. You can expect 2-4 MOA with Milsurp ammo. Possibly better if you get an excellent bore, find ammo it likes, and you do your part - or if you handload. Right now being a hex laminate raises the value about $20. Collectors are generally focused on other attributes and a hex laminate (unless it has something else going for it) will always remain a common Mosin refurb in a pretty non-original stock! But it sounds like an excellent first Mosin.


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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
This will be a rifle refurbished by the Soviets. Virtually all refurbs have force matched non-original parts (ground or lined out and restamped or EPd). On a refurb, a laminate stock is correct. How well it shoots depends on bore condition and less on how much counterbore or being a hex receiver. You can expect 2-4 MOA with Milsurp ammo. Possibly better if you get an excellent bore, find ammo it likes, and you do your part - or if you handload. Right now being a hex laminate raises the value about $20. Collectors are generally focused on other attributes and a hex laminate (unless it has something else going for it) will always remain a common Mosin refurb in a pretty non-original stock! But it sounds like an excellent first Mosin.


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What is the value of a re-furb Hex laminate? Is $200 too high a price for one of unknown condition ie counterbore, forced match etc?
 

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What is the value of a re-furb Hex laminate? Is $200 too high a price for one of unknown condition ie counterbore, forced match etc?
A refurb hex laminate is guaranteed to be force matched. So that is not an issue. Rifles were assembled from piles of parts. Note that force matching does include grinding off old SN and restamping (with or without prefixes).

Myself I don't like counterboring but I have never heard of it affecting the price of a rifle.

Your concerns in a generic year/maker refurb should be cosmetic condition, bore condition, presence of any rust, and that the SNs are (force of course) matching.

$200 seems high for an unknown. However, I did pay that much for a laminate wartime 91/30 from Alllans Armory that was carefully graded and mint condition and shown with photos.

Here it is:





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Laminate stock does nothing to influence rifle's accuracy. As far as collector value, it adds none and actually reduces it. Hex receiver Mosin should have a pre war stock with screwed in escutcheons.
I would agree with the first part,but not the second.These are refurbs. I didn't own a laminated stock Mosin untill Spaxspore decided to do a "Laminate Photo Shoot" I looked at those photos one too many times and then HAD to purchase one. I believe I even blamed him for having to explain to my wife why...LOL..There are some very handsome laminate stocks out there and even my wife had to agree it was a sharp looking piece of wood...Larry
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Laminate stock does nothing to influence rifle's accuracy.

Really?

I thought a laminate stock was a plus for accuracy as they are more stable under changing moisture levels and changes in temperature if it was properly fitted to the rifle in comparison to a wood stock fitted equally well.

On the other hand the Russians may have been knocking out rifles and stocks with inherent quality flaws of which fitting the stock may have been an issue.

I hear you about collector value as it is not original to the rifle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
A refurb hex laminate is guaranteed to be force matched. So that is not an issue. Rifles were assembled from piles of parts. Note that force matching does include grinding off old SN and restamping (with or without prefixes).

Myself I don't like counterboring but I have never heard of it affecting the price of a rifle.

Your concerns in a generic year/maker refurb should be cosmetic condition, bore condition, presence of any rust, and that the SNs are (force of course) matching.

$200 seems high for an unknown. However, I did pay that much for a laminate wartime 91/30 from Alllans Armory that was carefully graded and mint condition and shown with photos.

Here it is:





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Beautiful Rifle!
 
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