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I have had this a while,and I this is my first post on the new reconstructed Gunboards.The orginal SN is g12132.They kept all the orginal parts together,The only thing that dosent match is the bolt and rear sight leaf.Stock,bands,TG,FP and main action screws all still match the orginal Portugese 98k SN.The crest looks like it was double struck or that the die skipped a litttle when it was rolled on.It is import marked on end of barrel,Century arms.-The rear sight leaf doesnt match.I figure it did end up in Wehrmacht service,in Norway and must have been surrendered at end of WW2 to be converted to 30.06 later.
 

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Now that is a seriously cool K98-F1 - What a story that must have. It is my understanding that the German troops in Norway were hard core front line soldiers because of the Nazi fear of British invasion of Norway. I wonder if there was a unit that was armed with Portugese K98k? Or was this a rifle that was issued to a Waffen SS unit? My German unit history is minimal, so one of the experts would have to answer those questions.
 

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I'm no expert, but at least I'm Norwegian...

Nice rifle! The markings before the Norwegian serial number HÆR, means it was used by the Norwegian army (Navy and airforce had different markings). As the AG3 took over as our army weapon these were used by home guard units.

There are rearsenaled bayonets to be found for it too, you can recognise them on the thick dark blueing and the scabbards have had an attachment soldered on that fits the US M1910 belts.

As for German frontline troops in Norway there were loads of them, Germany attacked the soviet union from the North too pushing towards Murmansk, but were stopped at the river Litsa. The fighting on the Litsa front was very hard in terrible artic weather conditions. So there were very many German frontline soldiers that went through Norway on the way to the north russian front. Also as you stated, kriggevaer, there was fear of the British... the Brits actually laid mines along parts of the Norwegian coast at the time of the German invasion. It was actually stated by the Germans that they came to save Norway from British aggression...

In 1944 the soviet red army managed to push the Germans back from the river Litsa and the Germans withdrew through Norway using the scorched earth tactics to slow the pursuing Russians down...

So, no telling now what your rifle has taken part in, but it may have been in one of the many prison/POW camps, in a garrison somewhere, been used by border guards guarding our long border to neutral sweden, or it may have been all the way up in the arctic and been carried south by a retreating German soldier... One can only imagine.
 

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:DMange Tak for the information Bayonetcollector - I remember seeing a picture of a Nazi poster from Norway in World War II that had the message that the Germans were "liberating" the Norwegian people from the terrible Brits and Russians. Pretty ironic. Being in Norway you must have seen the movie, "The Last Lieutenant", that is the English title. I can't remember what it was in Norwegian. Sad movie - Anyway, K98-F1 rifles are some of my favorites.
Hilsen
 

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I really want one of those Norwegian K98's. They are just plain cool!!
 

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Norwegian

That is a nice rifle, mine is a BCD and is not quite as nice, I think someone redid the stock on mine. They were imported some time ago and I don't believe it was many that were imported. Its interesting to compare the Israeli, The Norwegian, the Yugo and the Original K98 side by side.
 

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mitch: ...and the French-modified K98k's...

Betonfahrer: Thats a VERY nice one! I think the scarcity of the Portuguese-crested rifles adds desireability to it. Congrats on a rather unique find. DDR
 
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