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Diamond Bullet Member
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Very good.This is one that went to Spain for the Spanish Civil war.Most refinished after the war.Some have large Flaming bomb with MP8 in the bomb part.That is typical Spanish proof for foreign stuff.They were also sent WZ-29 rifles.This has nice WW1 Proofed German bolt with I belive Bavarian Lion proof.There are guys out there that will have a better answer to this than I.
 

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Platinum Bullet member
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6,996 Posts
Why do we always have to start at the end, or in the middle. How 'bout lets start at the beginning. What did you pay for it? A whole lot easier than playing 20 questions. You either stole it, got it for a fair price, or got screwed. The outcome is the same either way. Just, my way is faster.
 

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Platinum Bullet Member and Certified Curmudgeon
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15,942 Posts
Just for the record, this is not a K98az or the more correct term Kar 98a. It is a K98. Also not a K98k which is all too often called a K98.

Regards,
Bill
 

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Platinum Bullet member
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Where id the term AZ come from anyway? I guess collectors. It's my understanding, that the Germans never used it. Like you said, it's Kar98a.
 

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Why K98az? "Aufpfanzvorrichtung meaning with bayonet lug, and Zusammenstellen meaning stacking rod", innaccurate or not...

Technically, it is a Karabinek Wzor 1898 or KbK Wz.98, no? ;)
 

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Platinum Bullet Member and Certified Curmudgeon
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Why K98az? "Aufpfanzvorrichtung meaning with bayonet lug, and Zusammenstellen meaning stacking rod", innaccurate or not...

Technically, it is a Karabinek Wzor 1898 or KbK Wz.98, no? ;)
Correct. Or, as it says on the siderail, K98.

You gotta watch out for those Engels. ;) Keep your powder dry.

Regards,
Bill
 

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Administrator
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The Kar98AZ (capitals) was the designation of this carbine during development..there were several versions, with and without both the Bayonet bar and the stacking hook...the final version accepted in 1907 (production began 1908) was the "AZ" version....to the Germans, it became simply the "Kar98" from 1908 to 1920 or so ( the earlier 18 inch brl. "Kar98" had already been withdrawn by 1908)...after WW II, they developed a "Kar" version of the Gew98 ( ie, turned down bolt, bolt stock cutout, Flat tangent rear sight, slot in buttstock for side sling, Middle Band with Two sling attachments. For General use by Truck mounted troops and Mounted Artillery etc, in addition to the early (1908) Kar98....so to distinguish them in Paperwork (only) the post-nominals "a" and "b" were added ( Kar98a== Short Rifle, Kar98b== Modified Gew98 for side carry)....Since in the German Ordnance Mindset, and "side carried" Firearm was a "Karabiner", the naming ( despite the long barrel) was Logical....Those Germans!!!

Doc AV
 

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8,107 Posts
Possibly, but the armories, even in Spain, had trained personnel using the equipment and they did their work to a high standard that had to pass inspection. Bubba on the other hand can rarely duplicate the work of a professional. Your rifle has not been touched since armory refinishing, you can be pleased with it.
 

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Platinum Bullet Member and Certified Curmudgeon
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That is correct runner, Radfahrergewehr was a pre-WW1 issue and is very rare, similar to the post-war Kar98B but not the same.
A quick ID feature is the rear band on a Radfahrergewehr. It is wide with an off center groove around it and a screw in the bottom (no spring). It is similar to the wide K98b rear band but is different from any other Mauser barrel band.

That added to the Fahrvergnügen of the Radfahrergewehr. ;)

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fahrvergnügen

Regards,
Bill
 
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