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Silver Bullet member
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My advice after building some custom mausers is;

DO NOT START!!!!

If you were doing almost everything yourself it'd be a nice hobby to spend $500 bucks plus on.

Paying someone else to do most of it - No. You'll be happier with a a good quality sporting rifle from one of the big manufacturers. Any teething problems and they'll fix it. Build it yourself and you may take years to get it right and be heartily sick of it long before then.

If you are competent to make a stock you can get a sporter with a cheap or beat up stock, or a barrelled action, and make your own, perfectly fitted to you. I would suggest an inletted stock. Thats done by a stock duplicator and is pretty inexpensive. If you get a nice blank you can have it done pretty cheap, or just buy one of their inletted, unfinished stocks made on their blanks.

I've done a couple of Richard's Microfit 96% inletted stocks that worked out very well. They also do a 99% inlet on some actions. http://rifle-stocks.com/ I had good luck there but there are lots of other companies, just do a search.

Some of the older gunsmithing books cover making a gunstock from scratch but I haven't seen any modern books on it. BTW, if you want the stock checkered, and its good or better quality wood - send it to an expert. You will be guaranteed to screw it up.
 

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Silver Bullet member
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36,239 Posts
Considering that a gunsmith is going to have to do all the barrel and chambering work and tap it and/or install sights, and forge or weld the bolt handle to clear the scope, and blue it that doesn't leave much for you to do beyond the stock!
So far I've been happiest with my Interarms MkX Mauser in .375 H&H Magnum. It was already tapped for a scope, almost new but mounted on a really crummy stock. I installed the sight bases, had to file an edge off one to fit, and the 2x7 scope. Made a stock in a Richards Microfit "Modern Classic" style with rosewood cap, 2 crossbolts (capped off with contrasting wood dowels) for the dual recoil lugs, Decelerator pad, used Brownell's steelbed for the action and free floated the barrel. The stock went throught he usual oil finish procedure, sanding down to 600 grit, sealer, lots and lots of coats of tung oil, and a wipe-down every year with more oil. Didn't bother with checkering because it a. costs b. isn't needed for a good grip with a properly sized stock and c. I like the way the wood grain looks.
Recoil, thanks to the stock in length, grip and forearm size, fitting me perfectly, is pretty light, and the rifle does 1.5 inch 100 yard groups with loads right out of the reloading charts.
No problems or drama whatsoever.
I'll post a pic next time I get the camera out.
 
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